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Early history of Tillamook

  • Mss 213
  • Colección
  • circa 1890-1904

This collection consists of the original manuscript of "Early History of Tillamook," by Warren N. Vaughn, as well as typescript copies and a microfilm copy of the history, and biographical information about Vaughn. The original manuscript, undated but probably created in the 1890s, is handwritten in four ledgers or notebooks, and consists of Vaughn's detailed recollections about the earliest emigrants to and events in the Tillamook Bay area, 1851-circa 1863. It begins as a history of Tillamook County but ends abruptly at the end of the fourth volume. Microfilm in the collection is a copy of Vaughn's original manuscript. The collection also includes two undated typescript transcripts of "Early History of Tillamook": one in which each volume is bound separately with paper and twine, and one that was copied, edited, and consolidated into a single book by Louise W. Goodrich of Tillamook, Oregon, for the Columbia Gorge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Colonists in Portland, Oregon. Other materials in the collection include an Oregon Historical Society questionnaire filled out by Vaughn and dated 1902, providing biographical and genealogical details, information on his journey to Oregon, and remarks on Native people, particularly Chief Kilchis; and a photocopy of a biography of Vaughn in "Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon" (Chicago, Chapman Publishing Company, 1904).

Sin título

Oral history interview with Jane M. Armentrout

  • SR 9565
  • Colección
  • 1978-06-05

This oral history interview with Jane M. Armentrout was conducted by Roberta Watts on June 5, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Armentrout discusses her family background, and talks about the life and career of her father, Dr. Harold Bunce Myers. She talks about his early life, about his education, and about her parents' marriage. She describes how her parents came to Oregon in 1914, and speaks at length about Harold Bunce Myers' career as a professor at the University of Oregon Medical School, now Oregon Health & Science University. She also talks about some of her father's students. She describes her interest in studying science, shares her experience of being discouraged from applying to medical school because of her gender, and talks about jobs she held before starting a family. She closes the interview by talking about her father's personality and by sharing memories of her early life with her parents.

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Stella Maris House collection, 1940-1973; bulk : 1960-1972

  • Mss 1585
  • Colección
  • 1940 - 1973

Ranging in date from 1940 to 1973, the Stella Maris House Collection consists of printed material, correspondence, and administrative, financial, and legal records created and collected by the Portland, Oregon-based social justice group during the course of their work. The collection demonstrates the local evolution of social issues key to the history of the United States during the 1960s. Over a third of the archive's content is dedicated to Oregon's migrant labor rights movement, and it also features records documenting the area's civil rights movement, urban renewal projects, interstate highway infrastructure, and social welfare programs initiated by the Economic Opportunity Act.

The bulk of the collection consists of printed material created by a number of local and national organizations between 1960 and 1972, then collected by the Stella Maris House. This portion of the archive includes programs, reports, studies, surveys, correspondence, brochures, and flyers generated by civil rights, migrant rights, and peace movement groups. Items of note include the Albina Neighborhood Improvement Project's plans for urban redevelopment (Series B), an African-American employment survey conducted by the Metropolitan Interfaith Commission on Race (Series E), and records documenting the Housing Authority of Portland (Series I). The collection also features printed material created by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (Series E), the Valley Migrant League (Series J), and the United Farm Workers (Series J). Newspaper clippings that document events important to social justice movements constitute a substantial part of the collection.

A small but significant portion of the collection was created by the staff members of the Stella Maris House; it includes notes by the staff documenting the meetings of local groups. These meeting notes often provide remarkably candid insights into the workings of area groups. Additionally, Stella Maris House staff members also contributed group and program histories to the collection.

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Monteith family photograph collection, 1847-1854

  • Org. Lot 1388
  • Colección
  • 1847 - 1854

This collection is comprised of two (2) daguerreotypes showing portraits of brothers Thomas and Walter Monteith, who founded the town of Albany, Oregon, circa 1849. They traveled to Oregon from New York in 1847 and settled adjacent land claims, sharing a house which straddled the two claims.

Oral history interview with Ellen L. MacVeagh

  • SR 9472
  • Colección
  • 1976-02-20

This oral history interview with Ellen L. MacVeagh was conducted by Charles Digregorio at MacVeagh's home in Portland, Oregon, on February 20, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. MacVeagh's pet birds are audible throughout the interview.

In this interview, MacVeagh speaks at length about her family background, including the careers of her father, Abbot Low Mills (1858-1927), and her uncle Cicero Hunt Lewis (1826-1897), also known as Cicero Horatius Lewis. She discusses her early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about her recreational activities and social life in the Portland area in the early 20th century, including dances at the Vancouver Barracks in Vancouver, Washington, and horseback riding. She speaks about Chinese American residents of Portland, particularly men who worked for her family. She shares stories about Captain John Heard Couch and other early Portland residents. She closes the interview by speaking about living in France and Italy during the 1920s.

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Oral history interview with Barbara Elliott Davies

  • SR 9372
  • Colección
  • 1976-07-18

This oral history interview with Barbara Elliott Davies was conducted by Charles Digregorio at Davies' home in Portland, Oregon, on July 18, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library.

In this interview, Davies discusses the life of her father, Thompson Coit Elliott (1862-1943), a former executive director of the Oregon Historical Society. She also talks about her grandfather, John Euclid Elliott (1829-1888), and his role in the development of Walla Walla, Washington. She discusses her work for Oregon Historical Quarterly, the journal of the Oregon Historical Society; and talks about working with her father to acquire collections for the historical society, particularly the Protestant Ladder.

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Oral history interview with Charles E. Heaney

  • SR 9327
  • Colección
  • 1978-05-15 - 1978-05-22

This oral history interview with Charles E. Heaney was conducted by Charles Digregorio at Heaney's home in Portland, Oregon, on May 15 and May 22, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on May 15, 1978, Heaney discusses his interest in calligraphy. He talks about his early life in Portland, Oregon, about working for the Brandenburg Engraving Company, and about studying at the Museum Art School, now known as the Pacific Northwest College of Art. He describes traveling in Eastern and Southern Oregon and in rural Nevada, and talks about how those areas influenced his paintings. He discusses his artistic process, talks about his friendship with Oregon artist C. S. Price, and reflects on what it means to be an artist. He speaks about his feelings regarding his early artwork.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 22, 1978, Heaney speaks further about his friendship with C. S. Price, and talks about Price's life, his personality, and his career as an artist.

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June D. Drake photographs

  • Org. Lot 678
  • Colección
  • 1860-1955

Collection consists of approximately 2,918 original photographic prints and 3,800 original glass and acetate negatives taken by photographer June D. Drake of Silverton, Oregon, as well as 3,042 copy prints made by the Oregon Historical Society from the original negatives. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs that Drake took of various towns in Oregon, including Silverton, Mount Angel (including Mount Angel Abbey), and Salem, Oregon, from approximately 1900-1953. These photographs depict street scenes, businesses, schools, churches, and other town buildings, as well as significant events and celebrations. There are also a number of photographs that Drake took of the area that became Silver Falls State Park, as well as a large number of portrait photographs taken by Drake from about 1900-1952, including both studio and informal portraits.

Other subjects represented in the collection include transportation and agriculture in Oregon; the lumber industry around Silverton, including the Silver Falls Timber Company and the Silverton Lumber Company; Homer Davenport and his family in Silverton; the Chemawa Indian School near Silverton, and other portraits of Native Americans from the area; the military in Oregon, including the Oregon State Militia during World War I and World War II; and photographs of animals. The collection also includes five photograph albums; of note is an album titled "A History of Silverton, Oregon, and its environs," which contains detailed descriptions from 1863 to the 1930s, and includes places of business, worship, and study, among other scenes. There are also a number of photographs of various artifacts and other objects collected by Drake to document the history of Silverton.

Photographs in this collection that date prior to 1900 were originally taken by other photographers, including Silverton photographer William L. Jones, and reprinted by June D. Drake, who owned many of Jones's negatives.

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Oral history interview with Charles Digregorio

  • SR 2527
  • Colección
  • 2001-04-04

This oral history interview with Charles Digregorio was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Portland, Oregon, on April 4, 2001, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. A transcript is available.

In this interview, Digregorio describes how he became the first oral historian at the Oregon Historical Society and talks about his experience studying oral history at Columbia University in New York, New York. He talks about oral history interviews he conducted for the historical society, particularly a series of interviews regarding Willamette Industries; shares his interviewing process; and discusses how the oral history program was funded. He shares his reasons for leaving the Oregon Historical Society. He closes the interview by talking about the people he worked with at the society's research library.

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Oral history interview with Richard G. Montgomery

  • SR 9569
  • Colección
  • 1976-05-16

This oral history interview with Richard G. Montgomery was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on May 16, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Montgomery discusses his Montgomery and Gill family background and talks about the history of J. K. Gill Company. He talks about studying medicine at the University of California at Berkeley and at the University of Oregon Medical School, describes his involvement in the J. K. Gill Company, and discusses his career in advertising. He closes the interview by talking about the books he wrote.

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Oral history interview with Carol M. Beggs

  • SR 9567
  • Colección
  • 1976-11-04

This oral history interview with Carol M. Beggs was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on November 4, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Beggs discusses her family background and early life in the Willamette Heights neighborhood of Portland, including her upbringing and her recreational activities. She speaks about the life and career of her father, Richard Ward Montague, including his involvement with the Mazamas, a mountaineering organization. She shares her memories of the 1905 Lewis & Clark exposition, and talks about her social life as a teenager in early Portland.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Abbot L. Mills, Jr.

  • SR 9566
  • Colección
  • 1977-07-15

This oral history interview with Abbot L. Mills, Jr., was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on July 15, 1977, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Mills discusses his family background and speaks at length about the life and banking career of his father, Abbot Low Mills, who later became the president of the First National Bank of Portland. He discusses his early life in the Couch Addition area of Portland, which is now part of the Nob Hill neighborhood, and talks about families who lived in the neighborhood. He also talks about the Ainsworth family background of his wife, Katherine Mills. He describes how he came to work at the First National Bank of Portland in 1922, and talks about his career in banking there and at the United States National Bank of Portland.

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Oral history interview with Henry S. Mears and Margaret S. Clark

  • SR 9564
  • Colección
  • 1976-08-03

This oral history interview with siblings Henry S. Mears and Margaret S. Clark was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on August 3, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Mears and Clark discuss their family background, and talk about the life and career of their father, Portland businessman and Oregon legislator Samuel Maxwell Mears. Digregorio reads biographies of Samuel M. Mears prepared by the siblings. They talk about their early lives in Portland, including their social lives and recreational activities. They close the interview by talking about their brother, Arthur Maxwell Mears, and his involvement in Portland's shipbuilding industry.

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Oral history interview with Samuel H. Martin

  • SR 9563
  • Colección
  • 1976-08-09

This oral history interview with Samuel H. Martin was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on August 9, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Martin discusses his family background, and speaks about the life of his father, Charles H. Martin, who served as an officer in the U.S. Army, an Oregon congressman, and Oregon governor. He discusses his father's military career in China during the Boxer Rebellion and later as commander of the Oregon National Guard, talks about his father's real estate investments, and describes his father's personality. He speaks about his father's political career as an Oregon congressman and as Oregon governor. He then talks about his career as a lawyer in Portland, and about working for the federal government. He closes the interview by discussing his father's early life.

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Oral history interview with Henrietta C. Failing

  • SR 9550
  • Colección
  • 1976-07-14

This oral history interview with Henrietta C. Failing was conducted by Charles Digregorio on July 14, 1976, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Failing speaks about the history of the Failing family. She focuses particularly on the life and career of her father, James Frederick Failing, who came to Portland, Oregon, as a child in 1851; and on her uncle Henry Failing and his work as Portland mayor from 1864 to 1866 and from 1873 to 1875. She briefly discusses the role of Chinese Americans in 19th-century Portland. She also speaks about the life and career of her maternal grandfather, John Conner, who came to Albany, Oregon, in 1853. She talks about her family's involvement with the First Baptist Church in Portland. She closes the interview by talking about her early life in Portland, including her memories of the Lewis and Clark Exposition in 1905.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Ellen B. Berry

  • SR 9544
  • Colección
  • 1977-03-28

This oral history interview with Ellen B. Berry was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on March 28, 1977, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library. Berry's daughter, Ellen Bowman Martin, and son-in-law, Samuel H. Martin, were also present.

In this interview, Berry discusses the life of her first husband, John Linden Bowman, including their marriage, their family, and his death in 1928. She talks about Bowman's clothing business, which she later ran. She closes the interview by sharing memories of the area around the Arrah Wanna Hotel in Wemme, Oregon, which Bowman owned in the early 20th century.

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Oral history interview with Lew Cook

  • SR 9338
  • Colección
  • 1979-06-20 - 1979-06-26

This oral history interview with Lew Cook was conducted by Martha Gies in two sessions on June 20 and June 26, 1979. A transcript is available.

In the first interview session, conducted on June 20, 1979, Cook discusses the difficulty of safely storing nitrate film, which can spontaneously combust, and talks about his plans to hold a nitrate-burning bonfire event. He discusses his early life in Portland, Oregon, including how he became interested in film. He talks about spending time at Portland's Film Row in the early 1920s; about how he got his first camera at age 10; and about people he worked with in Portland's early film industry, including Jesse Sill and Claude Palmer. He describes running his own business, in which he traveled with projectors to show films in towns around Oregon, and discusses his involvement with the Oregon Camera Club.

In the second interview session, conducted on June 26, 1979, Cook speaks further about his early life in Portland and discusses his family background. He talks more about Portland's Film Row, including the reasons why the business moved to Gresham around 1928. He further discusses traveling with projectors to play films in towns around Oregon, and talks about films he made, particularly a film about a cute baby contest.

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Civilian Conservation Corps, Eugene District (Or.) photograph album

  • Album 380
  • Colección
  • 1933-1934

Photograph album documenting the history and activities of the Eugene (Oregon) District of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from May 1933 to May 1934. The album was assembled by Leo R. T. Burton of the Skinner Butte Camp for the Headquarters Detachment and contains photographs of district camps and surrounding scenery, construction activities, and CCC officers and personnel. Also includes maps of each camp, monthly service reports, and work progress reports. Includes camps at Belknap, Bradford, Brice Creek, Cape Creek, Coquille, Crane Prairie, Devils Flat, Drew, Fall Creek, Gunter, Loon Lake, Mapleton, Maury, McKinley, Melrose, Oakridge, Powers, Reedsport, Remote, Rigdon, Seven-Mile Hill, Sisters, Sitkum, Steamboat, Tyee, Walker, and Wolf Creek.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Helen L. Thompson and Mary C. Baker

  • SR 9562
  • Colección
  • 1976-10-27

This oral history interview with sisters Helen L. Thompson and Mary C. Baker was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on October 27, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Thompson and Baker discuss their family background, including the Huntington, Holman, and Malarkey families, who arrived in Portland in the mid-19th century. They talk about family businesses, including the Holman Transfer Company; and share stories about their grandparents' life in early Portland. They discuss their early lives in the Portland Heights neighborhood. They talk about people who lived in the neighborhood, about their education at Ainsworth School and at Lincoln High School, and about their childhood activities. They close the interview by discussing how the role of women in society has changed over the 20th century.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Margaret B. Krausse

  • SR 9561
  • Colección
  • 1977-01-26

This oral history interview with Margaret B. Krausse was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on January 26, 1977, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library. Hildreth H. Lupton was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Lupton reads from Krausse's memoir. Krausse then discusses her family background and early life in the King's Hill area in the Goose Hollow neighborhood of Portland. She also talks about spending summers in Long Beach, Washington.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Stuart R. Kerr

  • SR 9560
  • Colección
  • 1977-02-14

This oral history interview with Stuart R. Kerr was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on February 14, 1977, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Kerr discusses his family background and early life in Portland. He speaks at length about the history of his family's fruit conservation business, Kerr Fruit Concentrates, Inc. He talks about his father's role in the business, about running the business after 1941, and about competition in the wholesale grocery industry. He also discusses his involvement with the Mazamas, a mountaineering organization; childhood vacations with his family; and traveling after college.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Louise H. Martin

  • SR 9558
  • Colección
  • 1976-07-21

This oral history interview with Louise H. Martin was conducted by Ruth M. Powers in Vancouver, Washington, on July 21, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Charles Digregorio was also present.

In this interview, Martin discusses her family background and early life in Alaska; Oregon City, Oregon; and Spokane, Washington. She describes visits to her relatives' house in Oregon City, which is now known as the William L. Holmes House, or the Rose Farm.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Helen H. Gamble and Harriet H. Cass

  • SR 9555
  • Colección
  • 1976-04-22

This oral history interview with sisters Helen H. Gamble and Harriet H. Cass was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on April 22, 1976, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library. Henry C.C. Stevens was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Gamble and Cass speak at length about their family background and describe how their parents came to Portland. They talk about their early life in the Portland Heights neighborhood, including participating in social events at Pittock Mansion, their childhood recreational activities, and people who lived in the neighborhood. They also discuss the prevalence of water springs in the Portland Heights area.

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Oral history interview with Frank Ivancie

  • SR 2980
  • Colección
  • 2001-04-17 - 2001-04-18

This oral history interview with Frank Ivancie was conducted by Clark Hansen at the home of Ivancie's daughter in Portland, Oregon, as part of the Ira and Lauretta Keller Oral History Series, which documented the history of the Portland Development Commission. The interview was conducted in two sessions, on April 17 and April 18, 2001, and was recorded simultaneously on four audiocassettes and two videocassettes. The second half of the first videocassette has no audio, but the audiocassette recording is complete; the audio missing from the video recording is on Audiocassette 2. Along with the interview recordings, this collection includes two color photographs of Ivancie.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 17, 2001, Ivancie discusses his family background and early life in Marble, Minnesota, and talks about the history of Marble. He speaks about his service in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. He discusses his involvement in politics while studying at the University of Minnesota and describes how he became a teacher and later principal in Burns, Oregon. He talks about life in Burns in the 1940s and 1950s, about teaching at a school on a U.S. Air Force base in England from 1953 to 1954, and about his reasons for moving to Portland in 1954. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon Education Association, and describes how that experience led to his work as an executive assistant to Portland Mayor Terry Schrunk. He talks about Schunk's indictment for perjury, and about how Schrunk worked with the Portland City Council. He speaks at length about the work of the Portland Development Commission during Schrunk's time as mayor. He talks about members of the commission, particularly PDC chair Ira Keller, and describes some of the commission's development projects. He also talks about the role of the mayor in appointing people to various city commissions. He then discusses his campaign for a seat on the Portland City Council in 1966, talks about his work as a council member, and speaks about people he served with on the council.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 18, 2001, Ivancie discusses his work on the Portland Development Commission during his time on the Portland City Council. He talks about major construction projects the PDC worked on, including Memorial Coliseum and Tom McCall Waterfront Park. He discusses how the PDC worked with Portland Mayor Neil Goldschmidt, speaks about people he worked with on the city council, and shares his thoughts about Portland's form of government. He describes the transition to Connie McCready as mayor. He shares his reasons for supporting the construction of the Mount Hood Freeway, discusses the design and construction of the Portland Building and the Portlandia statue, and talks about his accomplishments overseeing the Water Bureau. He speaks about Portland's response to the ashfall resulting from the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. He closes the interview by discussing how Portland has changed since he left office in 1985, sharing his opinion about city government at the time of the interview, and talking about the 2000 presidential election.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Rick Harmon

  • SR 2531
  • Colección
  • 2001-10-17 - 2001-11-14

This oral history interview with Rick Harmon was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Harmon's home in Portland, Oregon, in two sessions, on October 17 and November 14, 2001, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Tape 6 of the interview is missing, but its contents are included in a transcript.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 17, 2001, Harmon discusses how he became interested in history while a student at the University of California, San Diego. He also talks about his marriage to Candice Gaucher. He then discusses his graduate school experience at Columbia University in New York, and shares his reasons for returning to UCSD, as well as his reasons for leaving graduate school to work in publishing. He then speaks about his work for the oral history program at the University of California, Los Angeles, in the early 1980s, including editing transcripts and conducting interviews. He also discusses the people he worked with. He describes his experience interviewing Lynn Townsend White, Jr. He then shares his reasons for accepting the job of oral historian at the Oregon Historical Society in 1984. Harmon then speaks at length about his work as OHS oral historian from 1984 to 1986. He talks about reviving the oral history program after a year-long hiatus, about changes he made to the program, and about people he worked with. He also discusses interviews he conducted, particularly with Monroe Sweetland and Gus Solomon; talks about using oral history interviews in articles he later wrote for Oregon Historical Quarterly as the journal's editor; and shares his interviewing methods. He then shares his experiences during and after his divorce in 1985, including being hospitalized for depression and experiencing suicidal thoughts.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 14, 2001, Harmon further discusses interviews he conducted, particularly with Kathryn Bogle and William East. He talks about the partnership between the OHS oral history program and the U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society. He then talks about the one-year period when he worked both as editor of Oregon Historical Quarterly and as the OHS oral historian, and shares his reasons for leaving the oral historian position in 1986. He describes the transition of the oral historian job to Jim Strassmaier. He closes the interview by talking about his relationships with Thomas Vaughan and Chet Orloff.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Linda S. Dodds

  • SR 2528
  • Colección
  • 2001-03-16

This oral history interview with Linda S. Dodds was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on March 16, 2001, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Dodds discusses her family background and early life in Springfield and Eugene, Oregon. She talks about studying journalism at the University of Oregon, about her marriage to John S. Brody, and about completing her bachelor's degree at Portland State University. She shares her experiences co-authoring a book on the history of Cedar Mill, Oregon, and talks about how those experiences led to her interest in oral history. She describes how she became the oral historian at the Oregon Historical Society in 1979. She talks about people she worked with in the research library, about changes she made to the oral history program, and about how the program was funded. She shares her reasons for resigning in 1982, and talks about her activities after leaving the historical society, including earning a master's degree from Oregon State University and serving as director of a now-closed museum about the history of cowboys in Eastern Oregon, which was located in Northeast Portland in the 1990s.

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Oral history interview with Francis J. Heitkemper

  • SR 9556
  • Colección
  • 1977-03-22

This oral history interview with Francis J. Heitkemper was conducted by Charles Digregorio in Portland, Oregon, on March 22, 1977, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Heitkemper speaks at length about his family background and describes how his grandparents came to Portland in the 19th century. He talks about the history of the family business, the Heitkemper Jewelry Store, discusses operating the store during the mid-20th century, and speaks about the types of merchandise the store sold.

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Oral history interview with Virginia G. Davis

  • SR 9554
  • Colección
  • 1977-05-26

This oral history interview with Virginia G. Davis was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon on May 26, 1977, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library.

In this interview, Davis discusses her family background, particularly the life and career of her mother, Page Morris Gilbert, and talks about her early life in the Dunthorpe neighborhood of Portland. She also discusses the family background of her husband, Nelson Bennett Davis. She speaks about how their families were acquainted with prominent Portland families and about their involvement in the timber industry. She talks about the music career of her brother, Giles Gilbert, aka Gilles Guilbert, and closes the interview by discussing her work with Margery Hoffman Smith on interior design for Timberline Lodge on Mount Hood.

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