Print preview Close

Showing 423 results

Collections
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

3 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Oral history interview with Gus J. Solomon

This oral history interview with Gus J. Solomon was conducted by Rick Harmon at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from July 23 to October 18, 1984. In this interview, Solomon discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his memories of World War I, his Jewish upbringing, his father's store, and his education. He then discusses attending Reed College, his interest in history, and his subsequent transfer to the University of Chicago. He discusses studying law at Columbia University, including his social life in New York, then transferring to Stanford University, including his developing political beliefs. He also discusses his family's financial difficulties during this time period. He talks about the difficulty in finding a job in a law office during the Depression, and about some of the cases he worked on, particularly cases involving civil rights. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, the Oregon Commonwealth Foundation, and the American Civil Liberties Union. He describes his work toward establishing a legal aid program in Oregon, his work on public power, and his efforts getting jobs for young lawyers, particularly those from underrepresented groups. He describes being rejected for military service in World War II and cases he worked on related to internment of Japanese-Americans, particularly after the war.

Solomon discusses serving as a judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his election to the bench and the opposition he faced; the adjustment from lawyer to judge; and his relationship with his fellow judges. He describes in detail his techniques for speeding up the judicial process, with some case examples. He then discusses his activities as a senior judge, beginning in 1971, which he describes as being largely the same as when he was an active judge. He talks about hearing cases in other districts, particularly in Southern California; the McCarthy era; and cases with political implications, particularly cases regarding the draft. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1959 to 1971, and the changes he made to rules and procedures of the court. He describes some of the law clerks he's had over his career, including Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. He speaks briefly about his early opposition to clubs with discriminatory policies. Solomon provides advice to lawyers on how to win cases, and discusses lawyers he has worked with. He talks about sentencing, judicial activism, and interpreting law.

Solomon closes the interview by talking about his personal life and activities. He discusses the many organizations he has belonged to, including the Reed College Alumni Association and Amnesty International. He also talks about organizations he regularly donates to, including the Jewish Federation. He describes his family life and the activities of his children and grandchildren.

Solomon, Gus J. (Gus Jerome), 1906-1987

Oral history interview with Hall Stoner Lusk

  • SR 9467
  • Collection
  • 1981-12-18 - 1982-01-20

This oral history interview with Hall Stoner Lusk was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Maryville Nursing Home in Beaverton, Oregon, from December 18, 1981, to January 20, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody. Sister Peter Kump was also present for the entire interview, and Catherine Emmons Lusk was present for the interview session on January 20, 1982.

In this interview, Lusk discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, from the East Coast in 1909 and his impressions of Oregon. He talks about practicing law in Portland and his marriage to Catherine Emmons. He discusses handling the case of the 1922 Oregon Compulsory School Bill and arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court. He briefly speaks about serving as a judge on the Oregon Circuit Court and as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court, as well as serving in the U.S. Senate for a few months in 1960, including working with Senator Wayne Morse.

Lusk, Hall Stoner, 1883-1993

Oral history interview with Hamada Haaji

This oral history interview with Hamada Haaji was conducted by Sankar Raman in 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Haaji discusses his early life in Somalia and the move to a refugee camp in Egypt when he was 6, and then to an apartment in Cairo two years later. He then talks about his life in Cairo, including education, his social life, and learning Arabic. He talks about his experience during the Arab Spring protests of 2011. He then discusses the process of being resettled in the United States and adjusting to life in Clackamas, Oregon. He discusses his education in Clackamas, including learning English. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for college and the future.

Haaji, Hamada (Mohamed), 1998-

Oral history interview with Hanin Najjar

This oral history interview with Hanin Najjar was conducted by Ibrahim Ibrahim on December 19, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Najjar discusses the reasons her parents came to the United States from Saudi Arabia shortly after she was born. She talks about gender roles in Saudi Arabian culture, her ethnic and cultural identity, and wearing the hijab as an expression of her feminism. She also talks about discrimination she has experienced as a Muslim. Najjar discusses her plans for the future, including studying journalism at Pacific University and pursuing a career as a journalist.

Najjar, Hanin, 1999-

Oral history interview with Harold Pubols, by Louise Pubols

  • SR 823
  • Collection
  • 1988-01-10 - 1988-01-22

Pubols discusses his family background, parents, siblings, Russian heritage, immigration to United States, early life working on a farm in Eastern Oregon, educational history etc.

Pubols, Harold

Oral history interview with Harry D. Boivin

This oral history interview with Harry Boivin was conducted by Clark Hansen in Boivin's office in Medford, Oregon, from July 25, 1991, to June 6, 1992. In this interview, Boivin discusses his family history and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon, as well as his education at Santa Clara University in California. He then discusses getting started in his law career, including working for the district attorney in Dorris, California, and then working with Claude McColloch in Klamath Falls.

Boivin then talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1935 to 1942, including serving as speaker of the House in 1937. He discusses partisan politics and coalition building; the old Capitol building and conditions after it burned down in 1937; his support of the New Deal; and his time as speaker. He discusses some of the legislators he worked with in the House, including Grace Peck. He also talks briefly about his activities after leaving the House, including trying to enlist during World War II, as well as serving on the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the Board of Education.

Boivin goes on to discuss serving in the Oregon Senate from 1955 to 1972, including as Senate president from 1961 to 1966. Some of the issues he discusses include reapportionment, logging and forestry, taxation, and agriculture. He also talks about campaigning, committee assignments, and the duties of the Senate president. Boivin talks often about the Oregon Institute of Technology and his role in its formation. He also discusses his working relationship with the many governors that served during his political career. He discusses his fellow senators, including Monte Montgomery, Al Ullman, Wayne Morse, and Debbs Potts.

He closes the interview by discussing the changes in the Democratic and Republican parties, and politics in general, over the second half of the 20th century.

Boivin, Harry D. (Harry Dolan), 1904-1999

Oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen

This oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen was conducted by Susan C. Glen from April 22 to June 10, 1995. In this interview, Bratzel Kremen discusses her family background and early life in Mulino, Gresham, Silverton and Salem, Oregon, including facing anti-German sentiment during World War I, working on the family orchard, and her education. She discusses the limited career opportunities open to women, her decision to pursue work as a secretary in law offices, and working as a court reporter. She then talks about attending Northwestern College of Law (which later became a part of Lewis & Clark College) at age 37, including her professors, her women classmates, and working full time as a court reporter while studying. She also describes serving as a court reporter for Judge James T. Brown at the Nuremberg Trials in 1947, as well as her travels around post-war Europe. She talks about her first race for the office of Marion County district attorney in 1951. She discusses practicing law in Salem, including representing mothers in custody cases. She then discusses her service as Marion County district attorney from 1956 to 1964, including cases she prosecuted and the long hours she kept. She briefly talks about her marriage to Leonard Kremen, as well as his family background and early life. She then discusses her return to private practice in 1964 and focusing largely on probate law. She closes the interview by talking about her travels.

Kremen, Hattie Bratzel, 1908-1996

Oral history interview with Hector Macpherson, Jr.

This oral history interview with Hector Macpherson, Jr. was conducted by Clark Hansen at Macpherson's farm in Oakville, Oregon, from February 14-25, 1992. MacPherson's wife, Katharine "Kitty" Macpherson, was also present. In this interview, Macpherson discusses his family background and early life on a dairy farm in central Oregon. He speaks at length about his father, Hector Macpherson, Sr., and his activism regarding farm cooperatives and higher education. He then discusses his high school education, particularly his involvement in debate; the history of the land his family's dairy farm is on; and life for farmers during the Depression. He talks about studying science at Oregon State College, training for his military service during World War II, and meeting Kitty. He then discusses running a dairy farm, including water rights and milk pricing. He describes his interest in land-use planning in rural areas. Macpherson also talks about his time in the Oregon Senate from 1971 to 1974, particularly his work on Senate Bill 100, which concerned land-use planning. He also talks about his involvement with the Republican Party, his political campaign against Glenn Huston, and the election of John Burns as Senate president. He speaks about the nature of his constituency, and his thoughts on why rural areas tend to oppose environmental regulation. He then discusses other legislation he worked on, including on field burning, bicycle paths, the Bottle Bill, and additional land use planning. He talks about legislators he worked with, particularly Vic Atiyeh, Jason Boe, Ted Hallock, and Betty Roberts. He closes the interview with a discussion about serving on the Land Conservation and Development Commission, land-use laws in other states, and his impressions of the 1992 Oregon delegation to Congress.

Macpherson, Hector, Jr., 1918-2015

Oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus

This oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus was conducted by Mary Ellen Page Farr in Ashland, Oregon, from March 13, 1999, to February 19, 2000. In this interview, Althaus discusses her family background, particularly her family's history of civil rights activism, and her early life on a farm in Troutdale, Oregon, including her education, her interest in science, and her social life. She discusses her experiences as law clerk for Judge James Alger Fee, from 1947 to 1949. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, with the law firm King Miller, now known as Miller Nash, from 1953 to 1970, including some of the cases she argued and other women lawyers she worked with. She closes the interview by briefly discussing her work as deputy city attorney for Portland from 1949 to 1953.

Althaus, Helen F.

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye

  • SR 1249
  • Collection
  • 1981-03-19 - 1981-03-19

This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Linda Dodds in Frye's chambers in Portland, Oregon, on March 19, 1981. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life on a farm in Klamath County, Oregon. She talks about the difficult experience of a huge change in her family situation as a child, when she was reunited with her mother and brother after having been raised entirely by her grandparents. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including influential professors, and meeting and marrying William Frye. She talks about raising a family and how postpartum depression drove her to start her teaching career. She also discusses her involvement in politics, including William Frye's political campaigns. She then talks about attending the University of Oregon law school in 1963, including other women in her class, balancing family life, and starting to practice law.

She describes becoming a judge for the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall and her later campaign. She talks about how her gender affected the way defendants perceived her. She also discusses how this new position affected her marriage and her divorce in 1975. She talks briefly about serving as a judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She closes the interview by discussing her current family life in 1981 and her plans for the future.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye

This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from January 9 to May 20, 2002. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon. She talks about her mother and brother contracting tuberculosis; how she was raised by her grandparents; and her early education. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including her professors; her involvement in student government and politics in general; and meeting Bill Frye and their subsequent marriage. She talks about teaching high school in Eugene, raising a family, and returning to the University of Oregon to study law.

Frye briefly discusses practicing law in Eugene and specializing in adoption. She talks about serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall. She also discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court, including her appointment by President Jimmy Carter. She talks about the cases she heard; judges she served with; and court procedure. She discusses sentencing; the role of dissent in lower courts; and the role of juries. She closes the interview by discussing her legal philosophy and how her opinions have evolved over the years.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab

This oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab was conducted by John C. Beatty on January 17, 1994. In this interview, Schwab discusses his early life in Portland, Oregon. He discusses his early jobs and attending Northwestern College of Law. He also talks about his service in the U.S. Army Reserves in India during World War II under General George E. Stratemeyer. He then talks about practicing law in Portland from 1947 to 1959. He briefly discusses his other activities during that time, including serving on the Portland School Board. He talks about serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He briefly describes his fellow judges. He goes on to talk about his activities since his retirement in 1980, including serving on the Northwest Power Planning Council and as mayor of Cannon Beach. He closes the interview by talking about Governor Bob Straub, Monroe Sweetland, Dorothy McCullough Lee and Dick Neuberger.

Schwab, Herbert M., 1915-2005

Oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott

This oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott was conducted by Clark Hansen at Hendershott's home in Eugene, Oregon, from November 16, 1993, to January 13, 1994. In this interview, Hendershott discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including his social life, his memories of Armistice Day in 1918, and his interest in skiing. He also talks about his memories of the 1929 stock market crash and the Depression that followed. He talks about attending the University of Oregon from 1931 to 1936, including a description of the campus and his professors. He then discusses serving as district attorney for Hood River County from 1936 to 1938, and talks about practicing law in Eugene, including judges he argued before and some of the cases he handled. He also talks about other lawyers that he admired. He describes his experience serving in Europe in the U.S. Army during World War II. He speaks briefly about his two marriages and his family life.

Hendershott discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1947 to 1949. He talks about his campaign; the 1947 plane crash that killed the governor, the secretary of state, and the president of the Senate; and juggling his service in the Legislature with his family life and his law practice. He talks about his committee assignments, legislation he worked on, and some of his fellow legislators. He discusses some of the issues that were important during his time in the Legislature, including taxes and public utilities.

Hedershott discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks about serving as city attorney for Eugene from 1959 to 1971; Martin Luther King Day celebrations and the black community; and hosting foreign exchange students. He speaks about his law practice, including arguing cases and the changes in the court system. He discusses traveling in Europe, in the Middle East, and in Asia. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of his family background and legal career.

Hendershott, Herman P. (Herman Phipps), 1913-2007

Oral history interview with Holly Hart, by Winter Drews and James Loos

Holly Hart is the owner of Old Wives Tales restaurant on East Burnside in Portland. She was born in Chicago in 1947 and grew up there before moving to Portland to attend Reed College in 1964, where she was highly active in protests against the Vietnamese War. Her identity as a lesbian became apparent around this time, and following graduation at Reed, she entered a period of intensive gay rights activism. Suffering burnout, she regressed from these activities before returning to them upon attending the law school at the University of California Berkeley from 1972 to 1975. Some time around 1978, Hart was on a panel commissioned by Oregon Governor Bob Straub to compile a report for the "Task Force on Sexual Preference". Upon the failure of the Mt. Moving Café, which Hart frequented during its brief run, she started Old Wives Tales, with an emphasis on multi-ethnic vegetarian cuisine.

Hart, Holly

Oral history interview with Howard Hobson, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9354
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-28

Hobson discusses his early interest in athletics, playing sports at University of Oregon, and his career as a college football, baseball and basketball coach, particularly at University of Oregon.

Hobson, Howard, 1903-

Oral history interview with Hugh Biggs

This oral history interview with Hugh Biggs was conducted by Clarence Wicks in the offices of Stoel, Rives, Boley, Jones & Grey in Portland, Oregon, from June 29 to July 2, 1988. In this interview, Biggs discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon, including the law career of his father, Dalton Biggs, as well as his father's service as a Circuit Court judge from 1910 to 1928. He discusses his own education, and life on a farm. He then talks about attending the University of Oregon, including studying law, social life, and serving as dean of men. He also talks about his wife, Elra Ware, and their children. He then briefly discusses practicing law in Ontario, serving as district attorney for Malheur County, and working as an assistant U.S. attorney in Portland, Oregon. He talks about going into private practice in Portland, particularly at Stoel, Rives, Boley, Jones & Grey, including the cases he worked on, clients he represented, and the history of the firm. He briefly describes the judges of the U.S. District Court of Oregon and his experiences arguing before them. He also talks about the various professional organizations he was involved in.

Biggs, Hugh L. (Hugh Lawry), 1904-1996

Oral history interview with Irina Francis

This oral history interview with Irina Francis was conducted by Katy Weaver on November 15, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Francis discusses her education in linguistics and international communication in Russia, and her marriage to Scott Francis. She describes her early life in Perm, Russia, during the Soviet era, including the diverse neighborhood she grew up in, hiding her Christianity, and her family life. She talks about her education in Russia, including bullying she experienced and her love of languages. She discusses the process of getting a fiancé visa, immigrating to the United States, and adjusting to life in Portland, Oregon. She also talks about traveling back to Russia to visit family. She describes job-hunting as an immigrant, dealing with stereotypes and discrimination, and her home life. She closes the interview by talking about her cultural and ethnic identity and her plans for the future.

Francis, Irina, 1982-

Oral history interview with Irvin Luiten

This oral history interview with Irvin "Irv" Herman Luiten was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from March 16, 1988, to January 19, 1990, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Luiten discusses his family background and early life on wheat farms in Ritzville and Edwall, Washington, including his early education and the struggles his family faced during the Great Depression. He then describes studying journalism at Washington State University in the late 1930s, including the evolution of his political views and his interest in radio broadcasting. He discusses his early career as a journalist for the Colville Examiner from 1940 to 1941 and for the Northwest Farm News in 1941. Luiten also talks extensively about his service during World War II, including acting as defense counsel for his battalion and about soldier morale. He talks about his work with the Military Intelligence Service to teach escape and evasion tactics to airmen and setting up lines of escape in France.

Next, he describes his post-war life, including taking the editorship of the Northwest Farm News; marrying Ellen Boyde and raising a family; taking a job at Washington State University; and beginning his career with the Weyerhaeuser Company, doing public relations work as a writer for Weyerhaeuser News. He talks about aspects of Weyerhaeuser that made him loyal to the company, including the company's forest management practices and the management style of Phil Weyerhaeuser. Luiten also describes his experiences as a lobbyist for Weyerhaeuser from 1953 to 1978. He talks about the primary issues Weyerhauser was concerned with, including taxes, particularly timber taxes; pollution; land use; environmental law; and labor laws. Luiten also discusses his involvement with the Izaak Walton League of America and his conservation work; the Clemons Tree Farm; the workplace culture at Weyerhaeuser; and the company's relationship with the public. He goes on to talk about working with lobbyists for other Oregon timber interests, the different timber harvesting philosophies between Weyerhaeuser and Georgia-Pacific, and how those philosophies affected the economy of the state. He speaks at length on the importance of public relations work. He also discusses working with legislators such as Mark Hatfield, Dick Neuberger, Clarence Barton, Dick Eymann, and Vic Atiyeh. He closes the interview by talking about his life in retirement.

Luiten, Irvin H. (Irvin Herman), 1915-1997

Oral history interview with Ivan Hernandez

This oral history interview with Ivan Hernandez was conducted by Sankar Raman on October 17, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Hernandez discusses his family's migration to the United States from Mexico when he was 11. He talks about the reasons that his family chose to immigrate and describes in detail his experience of being smuggled across the border in 2003. He talks about living in migrant labor camps in Oregon, learning English as a second language, and his education in both Mexico and Oregon.

Hernandez describes his middle school and high school education in Hillsboro, Oregon. He talks about making friends, helping his family work, and the ways teachers influenced him. He discusses his senior year of high school and his graduation. He talks about how his undocumented status affected his ability to get financial aid for college; about attending Mount Hood Community College and dropping out for financial reasons; and about working various jobs. He then discusses his decision to apply for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program; continuing his education at Portland Community College; and working jobs on campus. He talks about getting involved in student government. He closes the interview by discussing his plans for the future, particularly his plan to run for president of Mexico in 2036.

Hernandez, Ivan (Ivan Eduardo), 1991-

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy

This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy's office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield's feelings about President Richard Nixon's impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield's legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield's staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield's relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with Jack G. Collins

This oral history interview with Jack G. Collins was conducted by Sarah Ryan in 1998. In this interview, Collins discusses his family background and early life in Waukegan, Illinois, including working at the town's sewage treatment plant. He also discusses the family background of his wife, Janine Decker. He then discusses attending Princeton University, particularly his experiences in the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps. He also talks about serving in the Navy during the Korean War after graduation, from 1952 to 1954. He describes his and Janine Decker's courtship and later marriage. He speaks briefly about attending Harvard Law School. He then talks about relocating to Oregon, passing the Oregon bar, and working as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice Walter Perry. He describes his fellow law clerks, as well as working on a draft of the Oregon Post-Conviction Hearing Act. He describes the careers of many of the lawyers he's known while in private law practice in Oregon. He also speaks at length about the kinds of cases he tried, including Revolutionary War land scrip cases.

Collins discusses his admiration for John F. Kennedy and becoming an assistant U.S. attorney in 1963. He talks about working under U.S. Attorney Sidney Lezak. He also discusses his family, salary, and living situation during this time period. He briefly shares his memories of the 1962 Columbus Day storm and the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. He talks about some of the cases he prosecuted, including cases on maritime matters and mail fraud. He describes becoming first assistant U.S. attorney and how his duties changed. He talks about cases he worked on as first assistant, including regarding foreclosures and urban renewal, pornography, and the environment. He speaks at length about protests against the Vietnam War and during the civil rights movement, and how the U.S. attorney's office handled related cases. He also talks about the planning of the Vortex music festival in 1970; the FBI investigation of Dan Cooper (also known as D.B. Cooper) and the hijacking of Flight 305 in 1971; and the bombing of the Bonneville towers by a man calling himself "Jayhawker" in 1974. He describes his secretaries. He talks about white-collar crime, civil rights enforcement, and the use of blue boxes for wire fraud. He also discusses Rajneeshpuram and several of the cases related to the activities of the Rajneeshees. He talks about the War on Drugs, which was ramped up under the George H.W. Bush administration, and some of the related cases he worked on. He describes fighting and investigating wildfires; his dealings with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council; and civil forfeiture. He also discusses Native American fishing rights.

Collins discusses his retirement in 1995, including his retirement party. He talks further about Janine, her career as a librarian, and her later diagnosis with Cushing's Disease. He then talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He talks about teaching administrative law at Lewis and Clark College and Portland State University, his involvement with the Korean United Presbyterian Church, and his stance on the legalization of marijuana. He closes the interview by reflecting on the changes in the way the U.S. attorney's office operates, his most difficult cases, and his admiration for some of the people he's worked with.

Collins, Jack G. (Jack Gore), 1930-2010

Oral history interview with Jack G. Collins

This oral history interview with Jack G. Collins was conducted by Bruce James on August 15, 1996. Additional interview sessions were planned, but were never conducted. In this interview, Collins discusses coming to Oregon in 1958 to become a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice Water Perry; studying for the Oregon bar exam; and working with Bob Packwood. He then speaks at length about his family background and early life in Waukegan, Illinois, including his education. He discusses his involvement with the Presbyterian Church; some of the cases he worked on as a lawyer in Salem, Oregon; and attending Princeton University while serving in the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps. He closes the interview by talking briefly about his naval service during the Korean War.

Collins, Jack G. (Jack Gore), 1930-2010

Oral history interview with Jack Robertson

This oral history interview with Jack Robertson was conducted by Clark Hansen in Robertson's office at the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, Oregon, from November 7 to December 30, 1988. In this interview, Robertson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including the evolution of his political beliefs. He then talks about attending Stanford University, including studying abroad in Austria. He focuses particularly on student protests against the Vietnam War.

Robertson talks about joining U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's staff in 1973, after he worked as a volunteer for Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign. He describes Hatfield's campaign against Wayne Morse. He then talks about his duties as a legislative aide, and later press secretary, from 1973 to 1982, including speechwriting, research, and correspondence. He discusses Hatfield's relationship with other Oregon Republican politicians, including Tom McCall and Bob Packwood. He speaks at length about other members of Hatfield's staff and how Hatfield interacted with them. He also discusses speeches that he wrote for Hatfield, including some on topics such as the Middle East and refugees. He also talks about Hatfield's early use of computers in his office; some of Hatfield's legislative victories in the Senate Appropriations Committee; and Hatfield's personality. Robertson talks about working on legislation to freeze the creation of nuclear weapons. He speaks at length about the procedures of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He discusses Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party; other senators and political figures; the presidential administrations of Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Ronald Reagan; and the press. He also talks about a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield in 1984. He speaks at length about how Hatfield's personal morality influenced his votes on legislation, particularly regarding weapons and war. He describes the Northwest Power Planning Act, as well as Hatfield's views on nuclear power; the debate about funding for a neutron bomb; and Hatfield's foreign policy stances, particularly regarding Israel, Iran, and Panama. He also describes Hatfield's and his staff's reactions to Watergate; Hatfield's visit with Mother Theresa; Hatfield's efforts to locate soldiers missing in action in Vietnam; and chemical weapons in Oregon. He discusses Hatfield's stance on free trade, local government, and environmental issues. Robertson talks about how the Senate and Hatfield changed over the years. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's legacy, his own reasons for leaving Hatfield's staff, and his activities since then.

Robertson, Jack (John Strait), 1949-

Oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer

This oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer was conducted by Peter C. Richter from October 5, 2005, to April 4, 2006. In this interview, Tanzer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He briefly talks about his college experiences at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and Reed College. He then talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including his part-time jobs. He discusses practicing law in Portland and deciding to pursue a career as a public prosecutor instead. He talks about working for the U.S. Department of Justice in the organized crime division during the John F. Kennedy administration, particularly his work on the case of civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964. Tanzer discusses his reasons for leaving the U.S. Department of Justice that same year to return to Portland as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about his fellow prosecutors, defense lawyers he argued against, and some of the judges he argued before. He discusses his appointment as Oregon's first solicitor general in 1969 and describes some of the cases he prosecuted. He also talks about serving as director of the Oregon Department of Human Services from its inception in 1971 until 1973. He describes the types of social welfare programs he administered, discusses fighting budget cuts, and talks about working with Governor Tom McCall. He also speaks at length about volunteering with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Mississippi for one month in 1967 and describes many of the cases he worked on. Tanzer discusses serving on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1980, and on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1980 to 1982. He talks about some of the judges he served with, particularly Hans Linde, and some of the opinions he wrote. He closes the interview by discussing the relationship between the legislative and judicial branches of state government; changes in the judiciary; and his advice for aspiring lawyers.

Tanzer, Jacob B., 1935-2018

Oral history interview with Jacque Jurkins

This oral history interview with Jacque Jurkins was conducted by Mary Ellen Smith at the Multnomah Law Library in Portland, Oregon, from February 23, 2006, to April 13, 2007. In this interview, Jurkins discusses her early life and high school experience in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. She then talks about attending the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh and the discouragement she received from professors when she expressed her desire to become a lawyer. She speaks about studying law at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, including her experience as one of only a few women in the law school, her social life, and some of her professors. She also describes the events that led her to working in the university's law library. She talks about her decision to go to library school and pursue a career as a law librarian. She discusses studying law librarianship at the University of Washington, including her primary professor, Marian Gallagher; her fellow students; and working in the university's library. She then talks about working at the University of Washington law library, helping to establish the Pacific Rim Library, and her experience reorganizing the Colorado Supreme Court Library.

Jurkins discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, in 1964 to head the Multnomah Law Library. She talks about the disarray in which she found the library and her work reorganizing it. She describes providing organizational help for many other law libraries in Oregon. She discusses the expansion of the law library, the different buildings it has occupied, and her staff. She talks about the changes in information technology and how that has affected her library work, as well as the use of the library. She talks about the increased security at the library and courthouses as a result of shootings. She discusses some of the lawyers, judges, and politicians who patronized the library; setting up a library at the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College; and her role in the foundation of the Oregon Council of Law Libraries. She discusses teaching classes on legal research at Portland Community College, as well as her involvement with the Multnomah County Bar Association and the American Association of Law Libraries. She closes the interview by talking about her hobbies.

Jurkins, Jacque (Jacquelyn), 1928-

Oral history interview with Jaime Miranda

This oral history interview with Jaime Miranda was conducted by Keven Salazar on August 1, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. The interview was conducted in both English and Spanish. In the interview, Miranda discusses his business, M & M Marketplace, in Hillsboro, Oregon. He talks about his early life in Mexico City, Mexico, including making a living by helping his mother work as a street vendor. Miranda and Salazar then converse in Spanish for several minutes about Salazar's studies, as well as the diverse populations in Gresham and Beaverton, Oregon. Miranda then returns to the topic of his early life in Mexico City and speaks at length about growing up in poverty. He talks about living with his extended family in Juárez while his parents and siblings immigrated to the United States. Miranda and Salazar again converse informally in Spanish. Miranda then talks about joining his family in the U.S. at the end of 1985, and he discusses his life in California, including his education and working in the fields with his family. He closes the interview by discussing the importance of education.

Miranda, Jaime, 1974-

Results 169 to 196 of 423