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Brigadier General Paul A. Wolf presents Distinguished Service Cross to Helmuth B. Dewitz

Photograph of Brigadier General Paul A. Wolf (left) and Helmuth B. Dewitz after Wolf presented Dewitz with the Distinguished Service Cross, visible on Dewitz’s lapel. Dewitz received the medal in recognition of valor in France in 1918, during World War I; Wolf was his commander. The photograph was taken on March 29, 1932, at the National Guard armory in Portland. Image note: “Helmuth B. De Witz + Wolfe” (sic) is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image.

General Stanley H. Ford

Head and shoulders portrait of Brigadier General Stanley H. Ford facing slightly left. He is wearing a hat, overcoat, collared shirt, and tie. The photograph was taken after his arrival in Portland on February 20, 1933, to take command of the 5th Brigade at the United States Army post in Vancouver, Washington. The text “Gen Ford” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. See related image No. 371N0864.

General Fuqua outside Multnomah Hotel, Portland

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing slightly left. He is wearing a United States military uniform. The text “Gen. Fuque [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. The man is probably U. S. Army Major General Stephen O. Fuqua, who visited Portland and the Army post in Vancouver, Washington, on July 18, 1930. See related image Nos. 371N0889 and 371N0891.

Memorial service at Multnomah Stadium, Portland, honoring people killed in World War I

Photograph showing a memorial service honoring Canadians and Americans killed in World War I. The service was held at Multnomah Stadium in Portland on Wednesday, June 13, 1934. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 18 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, June 13, 1934, under the headline “Dedicators of Cenotaph Pay Honor to Comrades in Death.” The photographs had the following caption: “At Multnomah stadium Wednesday veterans and high civic officials of Canada and the United States joined to unveil a cenotaph memorial for war dead of both nations as symbolic of lasting friendship between the two countries. The dedication climaxed the Canadian Legion convention held here this week.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Just before flags of the United States, Great Britain, and Canada were raised on the towering flag pole.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Veterans Pay High Tribute to War Dead.” According to the story, the cenotaph unveiled at the service bore the following inscription: “In grateful tribute to the men and women of Canada and the United States who gave their lives in the World war. May their heroic sacrifice insure lasting peace among the nations. Dedicated at the Canadian Legion convention, June 13, 1934.” Also see image No. 371N3002, which may also have been taken at the memorial service.

Cyril G. Manning breaking ground for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing veteran Cyril G. Manning digging a shovelful of earth during a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. A band is playing in the background. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Break Ground for Veterans’ Hospital.” This photograph had the following caption: “Cyril G. Manning, disabled World war veteran, digs first shovelful of earth.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3014, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

Groundbreaking ceremony for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing the crowd at a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. At center right is veteran Cyril G. Manning, who performed the groundbreaking. At center left is an unidentified man holding a shovel. A story about the ceremony was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

USS Constitution under way on Willamette River, leaving Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and an accompanying tugboat on the Willamette River off Waud Bluff as the ship departs Portland on Tuesday, August 22, 1933. The frigate and crew visited Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3716 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal the day the ship departed. The photographs were published under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “The Constitution as she appeared below Columbia university on the way down river shortly after 6 a.m. Tuesday after a 21-day stay here.” Columbia University is now the University of Portland.

USS Constitution and tugboat sailing under St. Johns Bridge

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and a Shaver Transportation Company tugboat sailing under the St. Johns Bridge in Portland in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 22, 1933, when the frigate departed for Kalama after a visit to Portland as part of a national tour. At far right is the USS Grebe, which accompanied and towed the Constitution on the tour. A story, headlined “Old Frigate Leaves After 21-Day Stay” and two related images, Nos. 371N3705 and 371N3716, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 22, 1933. See related image No. 371N5539.

USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland, in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. A crowd is partially visible in the foreground. This photograph may have been taken on Friday, August 18, 1933, when a large crowd of spectators watched sailors set the sails on the frigate’s mizzenmast. See image No. 371N3712.

Crowd watching crew members set sails on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing a crowd of spectators watching crew members set sails on the mizzenmast of the USS Constitution on Friday, August 18, 1933. The ship was moored on Swan Island, Portland, during a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, August 19, 1933, under the headline “Constitution Preens Wings.” This photograph had the following caption: “While thousands of Portlanders looked on from the airport and the hill sides, sailors on ‘Old Ironsides’ set sails on the mizzenmast of the old warrior late Friday. Top picture shows the sails unfurled.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley shaking hands as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken on August 11, 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return, headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Ironsides” was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. See related image Nos. 371N3713 and 371N3719. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Presentation of Oregon state flag to crew of USS Constitution?

Photograph showing two unidentified women and four U. S. Navy officers standing in a row on a ship, holding a flag depicting a beaver. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, at a reception aboard the frigate USS Constitution after the ship arrived in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. In a front-page story on August 3, 1933, the Oregon Journal reported the following about the ceremony: “The outstanding feature of the reception was presentation of the official flag of Oregon to Commander [Henry] Hartley and the ship by the Daughters of 1812. Mrs. George H. Root, president, made the speech of presentation telling how glad the people of Portland were to have the privilege of visiting the great naval shrine and welcoming the officers and men. Miss Esther Allen Jobes, granddaughter of the founding president of the organization, presented the flag to the commander.” Also see image No. 371N0473.

Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, Mayor George L. Baker, and three unidentified men at Multnomah Stadium

Photograph of five men standing in a row on the field at Multnomah Civic Stadium during an event. In front of them is an unidentified Portland police officer. The man at left is Portland Police Chief Leon V. Jenkins, and the second man from left is Portland Mayor George L. Baker. The other three men are unidentified.

Dedication of giant air-mail box at 6th and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing a small crowd at the dedication of a huge air-mail collection box on the corner of what is now Southwest Sixth Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street. Standing in front of the box and holding a large prop key are Dr. L. T. Jones (left), president of the Portland Exchange Club, and John M. Jones, Portland postmaster. The box was set up by the exchange club to collect mail that would be carried east by the Varney air-mail service. The box was equipped with a loudspeaker to broadcast messages about air mail. The dedication took place on September 3, 1929.

Wedding of Joseph K. Carson and Myrtle Cradick

Photograph showing Myrtle Cradick and Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson at the altar on their wedding day, Saturday, June 19, 1937. Behind them is the Rev. William G. Everson, who officiated. The ceremony was held at the First Baptist Church (also known as the White Temple) in Portland. A front-page story and related photographs from the wedding were published in the Oregon Journal on Sunday, June 20, 1937. See related image Nos. 372A0107, 372A0109, 372A0110, 372A0111, 372A0112, and 372A0113.

Wedding of Joseph K. Carson and Myrtle Cradick

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson and Myrtle Cradick in a car on their wedding day, Saturday, June 19, 1937. The ceremony was held at the First Baptist Church (also known as the White Temple) in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 372A0107 were published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, June 20, 1937, under the headline “—And May They Live Happily Ever After.” This photograph had the following caption: “Mr. and Mrs. Carson in their automobile following the ceremony.” In addition to the photographs on Page 3, the Journal published two pictures and a story on the June 20 front page. See additional related image Nos. 372A0108, 372A0109, 372A0111, 372A0112, and 372A0113.

Joseph K. Carson wearing bib at bachelor party

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson during a bachelor party on June 15, 1937, at Waverley Country Club in Portland. Carson is sitting in a tall chair, wearing a bib, and holding a forkful of food from a small glass in front of him. The dinner party included speeches and pranks. The Oregon Journal published a story about the party on Page 6, of the June 16, 1937 edition. The story was headlined “Gifts and Wisecracks Give Hizzoner Merry Old Time.” Carson married Myrtle Cradick on June 19, 1937. See related image No. 372A0114.

Portland? firefighters manning hoses

Photograph showing unidentified firefighters, probably from the Portland Fire Department, standing in a street and holding several hoses that are spraying water toward the left, at a target outside the frame. The firefighter in the center is wearing a helmet with a large number 1 on the front. Above the 1 are the words “FIRE BOAT,” and below it are the letters “PFD.”

Scene of fire at Pacific Telephone & Telegraph building, West Park and Alder streets, Portland

Photograph showing firefighters and others standing among fire hoses in the outside the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph building at Alder and West Park streets (now Southwest Alder Street and Southwest Park Avenue) in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal city edition on Friday, May 8, 1925, under the headline “Here Is Fire Which Paralyzed City.” The photographs had the following caption: “Photographs of this afternoon’s blaze in the Telephone building at West Park and Alder streets, which brought home to thousands how dependent they are on telephones.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Lines of hoses littering the streets in the vicinity.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Telephone Service Paralyzed by Blaze; Damage is $150,000.” The story reported: “Telephone service in the downtown district south of Washington street was completely paralyzed today, shortly after noon, when fire broke out in the basement of the Main-Atwater exchange of the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company, West Park and Alder streets. The fire, which is believed to have been caused by a short circuit in the multiple switch box, was confined to the basement of the building and lay like a pall over the surrounding blocks of the business district. The estimated damage to the apparatus and building, which is valued at $600,000, is in excess of $150,000.”

Firefighters climbing to roof of building at Second and Pine, Portland

Photograph showing fire trucks parked outside a building on Pine Street at Second in Portland (now Southwest Pine Street and Southwest Second Avenue) in 1913. A ladder extends from one of the trucks to the roof of the building, and several firefighters are carrying a hose up the ladder. Two more men are standing on the roof of the building. A related photograph, image No. 373G458, was published on Page 7 of a special year-end section in the Oregon Journal on Saturday, December 27, 1913. That photograph was one of seven published under the headline “Portland Affords Adequate Protection Against Fire.” The photographs accompanied a story about the expansion and cost of the fire department and the number of fire alarms in 1913. Also see additional related image No. 373G0457. Image note: The number 120 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image. The number 131 was also written on the negative, then crossed out.

Bill Genn, Oregon State Police

Head and shoulders portrait of a man facing front and wearing an Oregon State Police uniform and badge. He is standing outside the Journal Building (now the Jackson Tower) in Portland. The name Bill Genn is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt awarding title of honorary deputy to Oregon Journal editor B. F. Irvine

Photograph showing Multnomah County Sheriff Martin Pratt (left) pinning a badge (not visible) to the lapel of Oregon Journal editor Benjamin Franklin Irvine. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on January 22, 1932, under the headline “Sheriff of 36 Counties.” The photograph had the following caption: “B. F. Irvine, editor of The Journal, being presented with a gold star by Sheriff Martin Pratt, making him an honorary deputy sheriff in all of Oregon’s counties, in appreciation of his work in supporting peace officers.” Image note: The name “B. F. Irvine” is written on the negative and is faintly visible at the bottom of the image.

Joseph John Osbourne testifying during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish

Photograph showing Joseph John Osbourne sitting on the witness stand in Multnomah County Circuit Court as he testifies during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish, age 70, who was found dead in a pond at his Northeast Portland home on December 12, 1934. The photograph was taken on March 25, 1935. That day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about Osbourne’s testimony and a related photograph, image No. 372A0796, also showing Osbourne on the stand. On March 28, 1935, the Journal reported that the jury had convicted Osbourne of second-degree murder, which carried a mandatory life sentence. Image note: The text “Osborne [sic] Trial” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

John Cyril Liard on witness stand during his murder trial

Photograph showing John Cyril Liard (center) sitting on the witness stand during his trial on a second-degree murder charge. At left are a group of men looking toward Liard. The photograph was probably taken on Saturday, January 11, 1919, when Liard took the stand in his own defense. Liard was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison. See related image Nos. 376G0023 and 376G0331. Image note: The text “Laird [sic] trial” is written on the negative sleeve.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish?

Photograph showing a telephone table in the corner of a room. The table and nearby wall molding are covered with what appears to be blood. A framed photograph is hanging on the wall next to the telephone. The photograph may have been taken at the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered there and found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. The wallpaper in this photograph appears to be the same as in image No. 371N3516, showing Mish’s dining room, where he was killed. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish’s killing.

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