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Columbia Steel Casting Company

This series contains photographs of steelworkers and equipment detailing the steel casting process used for making large steel components for Liberty Ships constructed in Portland (Or.) area shipyards during World War II.

Supplemental descriptive information contributed in 2019 by Chris Horn, Facilities Director for Columbia Steel.

Atkeson, Ray

Agriculture and animals

Photographs related to agriculture, horticulture, and animals from approximately 1920 - 1945. The bulk of the photographs depict people, animals, and scenes at fairs and livestock shows, probably the Multnomah County Fair in Gresham, Oregon, and the Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland, Oregon. Other images depict topics such as cats, dogs, wild birds, poultry, and Tusko the elephant; farms and farmland; flowers, flower shows, and gardens.

Oregon Journal (Firm)

Construction of the Umpqua River jetty, Reedsport, Or. photograph album

Album 453 was created between 1933 and 1947 and contains photographs of the construction of the Umpqua River jetties in Reedsport, Oregon. The north jetty was constructed in 1919 and reconstructed in 1947. The south jetty was constructed in 1934 and 1935. Album 453 includes at least one aerial photograph by Brubaker Aerial Surveys and at least two photographs taken by John Stilanos.

Vanport Flood photographs

Photographs of the damage caused by the Vanport Flood in May 1948 taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, Oregon.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Northwest School of Photography

Photographs taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, Oregon. They include photographs of the processing lab and students in classes as well as portraits taken by the students.

Yasutome, Jerry Jiro, 1919-1994

Vanport Photographs

Photographs of the aftermath of the flood that destroyed Vanport, Or. on May 30, 1948. The images depict the damage to buildings, bridges, roadways, and other structures in both Vanport and Portland, Or. Includes postcards and snapshots, as well as photographs taken by the Camera Art Studio of Portland, Or.

Camera Art Studio (Portland, Or.)

Manuscript of Wallowa River and Valley

An unfinished typescript with hand corrections of J. H. Horner’s work, Wallowa River and Valley. The manuscript details the history of the Wallowa Valley region in northeastern Oregon from approximately 1805 through 1950. The document includes extensive details on the origins of many place names in the region. The manuscript also includes a history of the Nez Percé people and their cultural traditions which Horner wrote in collaboration with Otis Halfmoon. Topics covered in the manuscript include Chief Joseph and the events of the Nez Percé war of 1877, settlement of the Wallowa Valley region, and local participation in World War I and World War II. John Harland Horner (1870-1953) was born in Kansas City, Missouri, and moved to Enterprise, Oregon, in 1911. He served as Wallowa County's deputy assessor from 1918 to 1924, before being elected county assessor in 1924. Horner also had a long-standing interest in the history of Wallowa County. For more than thirty years, he collected historical information and interviewed most of the area's early settlers and local Native Americans.

Horner, J. H., 1870-1953

Gertrude Glutsch Jensen speech on preservation of the Columbia River Gorge

This speech was delivered by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen on May 28, 1981, to an unknown audience. She repeats remarks made to the Portland Women's Forum at the Western Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon, on May 5, 1981. A person identified only as Mr. Short delivers introductory remarks. Jensen discusses the history of Columbia River Gorge conservation efforts by the Portland Women’s Forum and the Columbia Gorge Commission. She advocates immediate action by way of a presidential proclamation to designate the Gorge as a national monument; reads a letter she received from former Oregon Governor Oswald West regarding the Gorge; and talks about her friendship with conservationist Horace M. Albright. She presents arguments in favor of proposed legislation to designate the Gorge as a National Recreation Area. Jensen closes the speech by talking about the 1937 Columbia River Gorge Commission report, and Short makes closing remarks.

Jensen, Gertrude Glutsch, 1903-1986

Gertrude Glutsch Jensen speech on preservation of the Columbia River Gorge

This speech by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen was delivered around 1981 to a group of people gathered at her home in Portland, Oregon, under the auspices of Senator Mark Hatfield. The speech was also broadcast on KOIN radio. In the speech, Jensen talks about the history of Columbia River Gorge preservation efforts and discusses her own preservation work. She presents arguments in favor of proposed legislation to designate the Gorge as a national recreation area, and advocates immediate action by way of a presidential proclamation to designate the Gorge as a national monument. She also describes the current state of the Washington side of the Gorge. She closes the speech by talking about Chanticleer Point.

Jensen, Gertrude Glutsch, 1903-1986

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

This oral history interview with Cecil Edwards was conducted by Irvin Luiten from May 18 to 26, 1988. In the interview, Edwards discusses his family history and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his education and early interest in government. He then talks about his experiences working for the Oregon Legislature beginning in 1933. He discusses the old Capitol building, which burned down in 1935; campaigns he worked on, and the role of lobbyists. He also talks about working as secretary for Governor Charles Sprague. Edwards then describes his service in the National Guard during World War II, particularly working with horses and dogs. He talks about returning to work in Oregon government after the war ended, including serving on the Racing Commission; being fired by Governor Mark Hatfield; lobbying for the Oregon Cattlemen's Association; and returning to the Legislature to work as a secretary. He discusses the numerous committees he was secretary for, including the agriculture committee, fish and game committee, and land-use board. Edwards next discusses his tenure as secretary of the Senate from 1965 to 1975, focusing on many of the legislators he worked with, including Clarence Barton, Debbs Potts, and Jason Boe. He also speaks at length about redistricting, as well as the duties of the secretary of the Senate and Senate rules.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman

This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman's offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield's staff; discusses other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and talks about how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator's stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield's personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration's push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield's efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield's real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield's political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer

This oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer was conducted by Clark Hansen at Frohnmayer's office in Medford, Oregon, as part of the United States District Court of Oregon Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in two sessions, on November 28, 1989, and December 1, 1989.

In the first interview session, Frohnmayer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including the reasons his family came to the United States, his education, and family vacations to Seaside. He also talks about anti-German sentiment in Portland, Oregon during World War I and how that affected him in his social and political views. He also talks about the fire that happened at Washington High School during his senior year. He discusses working in hotels and attending the University of Oregon, including his social life, studying law, and his experiences during the Depression. He talks about people and professors he met during law school, including Judge William East, and about his involvement with the Law Review.

In the second interview session, Frohnmayer shares his political and social philosophy, and how it was affected by the Depression and World War II. He discusses his early career as a lawyer in Medford, including cases he worked on, his fellow lawyers, and judges he argued before. He also talks about his involvement in several organizations, including the Rogue Valley Memorial Hospital and the Oregon State Bar; and about his involvement in politics, including leadership positions on campaign committees for Mark Hatfield and Wayne Morse. He describes the effects of World War II and the construction of Interstate 5 on Medford. He speaks at length about his work with probate law revision and how he came to focus on it. He discusses his marriage to MarAbel Fisher Braden, and talks about their children and their children's families and careers. He talks about members of the legal profession whom he worked with, and shares his opinion about the qualities that make for great lawyers and judges. He discusses the politics involved in judicial appointments; describes jury trials and appellate hearings; and talks about ethical problems that lawyers face. He also talks about how changes in the legal system have affected his practice and clientele. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

Frohnmayer, Otto J. (Otto John), 1905-2000

Oral history interview with Lorna Grabe

This oral history interview with Lorna Grabe was conducted by Bob Zybach at Grabe's home in Corvallis, Oregon, on December 28, 1989. The interview was conducted as part of the Soap Creek Valley History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon State University Research Forests to better understand the history, ecology, and culture of the Soap Creek Valley in Benton County, Oregon.

In this interview, Grabe discusses her family background and early life in Iowa City, Iowa. She then talks about her marriage to Don Grabe and about his career, and she describes how they came to live in Corvallis, Oregon, in 1968. She describes life in the Soap Creek Valley area, including other families in the area and recreational activities, particularly bird watching. She speaks at length about her involvement in the Soap Creek Schoolhouse Foundation, including the history of the foundation, the preservation work it has sponsored for the schoolhouse, and other members of the foundation. She also speaks about the use of wildflowers in its landscaping and discusses the story of a ghost haunting a barn in the area. She closes the interview by talking about the Soap Creek Schoolhouse Foundation's accomplishments and plans for the future, and by discussing the changes in the Soap Creek Valley from 1968 to the time of the interview in 1989.

Grabe, Lorna Mae, 1928-1993

Oral history interview with Donald Dickey

This oral history interview with Donald Dickey was conducted by Neil Vanderburg and Bob Zybach at the Green Valley Care Center in Eugene, Oregon, from August 18-19, 1990. The interview was conducted as part of the Soap Creek Valley History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon State University Research Forests to better understand the history, ecology, and culture of the Soap Creek Valley in Benton County, Oregon. Maxine Ann Dickey was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 18, 1990, Dickey discusses his family background and early life in Berry Creek, in the Soap River Valley area of Oregon, including his memories of snowstorms, life on the family farm, and other families that lived in the area. He also briefly discusses his 35-year career in rodent control for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 19, 1990, Dickey describes the wildlife in the Berry Creek area, his recreational activities and social life, and people and places in neighboring towns. He speaks at length about the sawmills in the area. He then revisits the topic of his 35-year career in rodent control for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He closes the interview by discussing his marriage.

Dickey, Donald C. (Donald Charles), 1914-1990

Oral history interview with Frankie Bell

This oral history interview with Frankie Bell was conducted by Vinita Howard from November 12-30, 1992. In this interview, Bell discusses her family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon. She discusses her education and attending the University of Oregon. She talks about the difficulty of starting a family while still attending college and trying to have a career. She discusses the various part-time jobs she held until she began working at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, in 1966 as a tour guide. She talks about working at the information desk at the Oregon Legislature from 1967 to the time of the interview in 1992, including facing sexism on the job. She describes her observations on the Legislature over her two and a half decades there, including on lobbyists, rumors, and inaugural changes. She also talks about the history of the Capitol building, as well as organizing holidays and exhibits at the building; the gift shop; and school tours. She closes the interview by speaking briefly about the personalities of many legislators over the years.

Bell, Frankie (Frances Estelle), 1937-

Oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab

This oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab was conducted by John C. Beatty on January 17, 1994. In this interview, Schwab discusses his early life in Portland, Oregon. He discusses his early jobs and attending Northwestern College of Law. He also talks about his service in the U.S. Army Reserves in India during World War II under General George E. Stratemeyer. He then talks about practicing law in Portland from 1947 to 1959. He briefly discusses his other activities during that time, including serving on the Portland School Board. He talks about serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He briefly describes his fellow judges. He goes on to talk about his activities since his retirement in 1980, including serving on the Northwest Power Planning Council and as mayor of Cannon Beach. He closes the interview by talking about Governor Bob Straub, Monroe Sweetland, Dorothy McCullough Lee and Dick Neuberger.

Schwab, Herbert M., 1915-2005

Oral history interview with Robert F. Smith

This oral history interview with Robert F. Smith was conducted by Clark Hansen at Smith's office in Medford, Oregon, from August 30 to September 1, 1995. In this interview, Smith discusses his family background and early life in Burns, Oregon. He talks about his interest in basketball while attending Willamette University. He also talks about running a ranch and multiple other businesses after graduation; his flying hobby; and his involvement with a number of civic organizations. He goes on to talk about being recruited to run for the Oregon Legislature by members of the Oregon Republican Party, and his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1960 to 1973. He discusses his campaigns, committees, fellow legislators, and legislation that he worked on. He talks about Tony Yturri, Monte Montgomery, Bill Holmstrom, Stan Ouderkirk, Clarence Barton, and Stafford Hansell. He discusses legislation on agriculture, taxes, labor, forestry and land use. He also talks about how his leadership style as speaker of the House from 1969 to 1973, and about his legislative agenda. He closes the interview by discussing the social life of legislators.

Smith, Robert F. (Robert Freeman), 1931-

Oral history interview with Helen G. Rees

This oral history interview with Helen G. Rees was conducted by Anne Cummins at Rees' home in Fairview, Oregon, on December 13, 1995. The interview was conducted as part of the Rural Telephone Operators Oral History Series, which was a series of interviews about telephone operators in rural areas in the early 20th century, conducted by Anne Cummins in the early 1990s.

In this interview, Rees discusses her family background and early life in Sherman County. She also talks about the family background of William A. Rees and his early life in Shaniko. Rees then discusses her life in Shaniko after her marriage to William A. Rees. She speaks at length about the telephone system in Shaniko in the 1930s and early 1940s, describing how the system worked and the equipment used, and she talks about some of the telephone operators. She closes the interview by talking about the different ways the operators served the community beyond the job of answering and directing phone calls.

Rees, Helen Guyton, 1910-

Oral history interview with Bill Fuller

This oral history interview with Bill Fuller was conducted by Jamie Minkus and Kirsten Wall in Portland, Oregon, on January 24, 2002. The interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Wine Archives Oral History Project, which collected interviews with notable figures in the wine-growing industry, including vintners, vineyard growers, community members, and workers active in the development of Oregon's wine industry. A transcript is also available.

In this interview, Fuller discusses his early experience with winemaking at the Italian Swiss Colony in Santa Rosa, California. He shares the reasons why he and fellow winemaker Bill Malkmus chose the area of Forest Grove, Oregon, to establish their winery, Tualatin Vineyards; talks about the types of grapes they grew; and discusses the first wines they made in the 1970s. He speaks about his involvement with the Oregon Winegrowers Association and talks about wine labeling legislation the organization lobbied for. He talks about the growth of the Oregon wine industry and market since the 1970s, and how it changed during the 1980s. He also talks about winning best of show at the International Wine and Spirits Competition with a Pinot Noir and a Chardonnay in the same year. He discusses his partnership with Bill Malkmus; talks about his children and their careers; and closes the interview by sharing his winemaking philosophy.

Fuller, Bill (William Lee), 1937-

Oral history interview with Dick Troon

This oral history interview with Dick Troon was conducted by Jamie Minkus and Kirsten Wall at Troon Vineyards in the Applegate Valley, Oregon, on April 20, 2002. The interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Wine Archives Oral History Project, which collected interviews with notable figures in the wine-growing industry, including vintners, vineyard growers, community members, and workers active in the development of Oregon's wine industry.

In this interview, Troon describes the beginnings of Troon Vineyard. He talks about planting the first grapevines in 1972, about taking a class on viticulture at Oregon State University, and about beginning to make wine in 1993. He discusses the growth of the wine industry in Oregon, talks about the climate and terroir of the Applegate Valley, and speaks about other winemakers in the region. He also talks about the State of Jefferson movement in relation to the Applegate Valley wine industry, discusses how the region differs from the Willamette Valley, and shares his experiences making Cabernet and Zinfandel wines. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He closes the interview by discussing his involvement with the Oregon Winegrowers Association, and Oregon wine label regulations.

Troon, Dick (Richard Donald), 1928-2011

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