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Account of Cargo of Ship Columbia and Sloop Washington agreeably to Invoice presented Captain Kendrick by the Owners

An account of cargo for the Ship Columbia and Sloop Washington covering the dates from October 1, 1787 through January, 1788. The log includes a record of the cargo aboard the ships when they left Boston on the state of the voyage and fragmented records of expenditures and supply use through January, 1788. The document contains 7 pieces of varying sized paper adhered in layers to a ledger page backing.

Barrell, Joseph, 1739-1804

Power of Attorney document and letter from Joseph Barrell to Samuel Webb

A legal document transferring power of attorney from Joseph Barrell to his attorney, Samuel Webb, to collect on debts owed from Richard Sodershorn. The document is dated November 22, 1788. It is signed by John Hoskins, Joseph Barrell, and James [illegible]. The document is notarized by Lemuel Barrett, Justice of the Peace. The document is bound with illegible scraps of other papers to a letter from Joseph Barrell to Samuel Webb dated November 9, 1788.

Barrell, Joseph, 1739-1804

Columbia Rediviva owners accounts log

An owner’s accounts ledger for the ship Columbia Rediviva accounting for roughly the years of 1787 to 1789. The document contains 11 pieces of varying sized paper adhered in layers to a ledger page backing.

Boston accounts and cargo lists

a hand-bound logbook containing cargo lists and a ledger of Joseph Barrell’s Boston accounts. The front cover of the book reads, “all the Ship Columbias Papers / Mary Barrell / Millburn, N.J.” The first 15 pages of the book contain a copy of the 1787 cargo lists of the Columbia Rediviva and the Sloop Washington. Joseph Barrell’s accounts book backfills the last 20 pages of the logbook beginning from the back cover of the book and written upsidedown to the first half of the text. There are 18 blank pages separating the two sections of the book.

Barrell, Mary

Plano de la entrada de Heceta y Rio de la Columbia situado en la latitud N. de 46ø19§ longd. 18ø53§ al O. de Sn. Blas descuvierto Cp. Dn. Bruno de Eceta el año de 1775, y reconocida este por el Captain Gray, y El Comandante Vancouver, 1792

A pen-and-ink map of the Columbia River. Water depths are shown by soundings. Translated title, "Plan of the entrance of Heceta and the Columbia River situated at latitude N. 46ø19§, longitude 18ø53§ west of San Blas, discovered by Dn. Bruno Eceta in the year 1775, and recognized by Captain Gray and Commander Vancouver."

Bodega y Cuadra, Juan de la, 1743-1794

A map of Lewis and Clark's track across the western portion of North America, from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean : by order of the executive of the United States in 1804, 5 & 6 / copied by Samuel Lewis from the original drawing of Wm. Clark ; Neele, sculp., 1814

A map depicting Lewis and Clark's route from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean. The map shows the relationship between the sources of the Missouri River, Columbia River, and the Rocky Mountains and the locations of Native American tribal groups. The map was copied by Samuel Lewis from William Clark's original drawing. Relief is shown by hachures.

Lewis, Samuel, 1753 or 1754-1822

Outlet of Columbia River, 1822

Map depicting the outlet of the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean. The map shows water depths, Astoria, Oregon, Gray's Bay, Cape Disappointment, and the locations of Native American tribal groups. The northern side of the outlet reads, "Country Low, open & marshy, interspersed with Pines. Thick undergrowth." The southern side of the outlet reads, "High Lands covered with Lofty Pines." The bottom includes a note that reads, "The Cape is a circular knob about 150 f. high," and a note that reads "Engraved for J. Melish's Description of the United States." Prime meridians: Washington, D.C. and London.

Vallance, J. (John), 1770-1823

"Flat Head Indian Missionaries."

Typed article written by Samuel Dickinson for Zion's Herald, a Methodist publication. Written in Louisville on March 28, 1834 and published in Zion's Herald on April 30, 1834. Dickinson writes that Reverend Jason Lee arrived in Louisville on March 22, 1834 while on his way to Oregon to become a missionary to the Flathead Indian tribe. The article sums up a missionary meeting in which Lee addressed a small crowd. Lee shared his views of the Flathead Indian tribe, and of the destruction that the white man's introduction of alcohol had caused. The article concludes by stating that Lee left for St. Louis on March 26, 1834. [Lee originally intended to do missionary work among the Flathead Indian tribe, but the area where he eventually settled in the Willamette Valley, near present-day Salem, was home to bands of the Kalapuyan people. Dickinson uses language common to justifying the nineteenth century missionary movement, including using disparaging and inaccurate terms and/or descriptions of Native peoples.]

Dickinson, Samuel

Letter from E.W. Sohon to the Editors of Zion's Herald, 1834

Typed letter by E.W. Sohon to the editors of Zion's Herald, a Methodist publication. Written in St. Louis on April 11, 1834 and published in Zion's Herald on May 21, 1834. Letter is titled, "Flat Head Mission." Sohon writes that Reverend Jason Lee and other missionaries have arrived in St. Louis on their way to Oregon to build the Flathead Indian mission. He writes of Lee addressing a meeting, and of Lee's views concerning the importance of missions and the work they undertake with native tribes. Daniel Lee, nephew of Jason Lee, and other speakers echo these beliefs. [Lee originally intended to do missionary work among the Flathead Indian tribe, but the area where he eventually settled in the Willamette Valley, near present-day Salem, was home to bands of the Kalapuyan people. Sohon uses language common to justifying the nineteenth century missionary movement, including using disparaging and inaccurate terms and/or descriptions of Native peoples.]

Sohon, E. W.

Letter from Anna Maria Pittman to George Washington Pittman, 1834

Handwritten letter by Anna Maria Pittman to her brother George Washington Pittman. Written in New York on April 19, 1834. Anna gives updates on friends and family, and encourages George to find religion. At the bottom of the second page is an acrostic poem written by Anna for her brother. [After arriving in Oregon, Anna Maria Pittman married Reverend Jason Lee.]

Lee, Anna Maria Pittman, 1803-1838

Letters to George Washington Pittman, 1834

This document contains two handwritten letters, both written to George Washington Pittman, brother of Anna Maria Pittman, on April 21, 1834 in New York. On the front is a letter to George Washington Pittman from his father, George W. Pittman, who writes him updates about the family. George Washington Pittman's address is listed as, "Fort Gibson U.S. Dragoons, Arkansas River, Arkansas Territory." Below is a note informing George that the family will be moving soon. On the back is a letter to George Washington Pittman from Mr. C. Hawley concerning the recent death of Hawley's son, Francis, in the military. Hawley asks George to keep Francis' personal items and clothing, and asks him to send Francis' obituary. At the bottom of the letter is a post script addressed to the Commanding Officer, asking that Francis Hawley's clothing be given to George.

Hawley, C.

Letter from Jason Lee to the Christian Advocate and Journal, April 29, 1834

Typed letter written by Reverend Jason Lee to the Christian Advocate and Journal. Written at the Shawnee Mission on April 29, 1834 and published in the Christian Advocate and Journal on June 13, 1834. Letter is titled, "News from Rev. Jason Lee." Lee wrote this letter shortly after his departure from Independence, Missouri as he began his journey on the Oregon Trail to become a missionary in Oregon. He writes of the difficulties he had in finding an adequate crew of men to accompany him on the Oregon Trail. Page 2 of this document was written at a later date, on May 2, 1834. It quotes Mr. Lee's observations of the native tribes in Kansas as he travels on the Oregon Trail. [Lee used language common to justifying the nineteenth century missionary movement, including using disparaging and inaccurate terms and/or descriptions of Native peoples.]

Lee, Jason, 1803-1845

Letter from Jason Lee to the Christian Advocate and Journal, June 25, 1834

Typed letter written by Reverend Jason Lee to the Christian Advocate and Journal. Written in the Rocky Mountains on June 25, 1834 and published in the Christian Advocate and Journal on October 3, 1834. Letter is titled, "Flat Head Mission." Lee wrote this letter as he traveled on the Oregon Trail to become a missionary in Oregon. It summarizes his journey thus far, through the months of May and June, much of it along the Platte River. Subjects include Lee's observations of local native tribes, including the Pawnee and Nez Perce. Other subjects include the landscape, weather, and buffalo. [Lee originally intended to do missionary work among the Flathead Indian tribe, but the area where he eventually settled in the Willamette Valley, near present-day Salem, was home to bands of the Kalapuyan people. Lee used language common to justifying the nineteenth century missionary movement, including using disparaging and inaccurate terms and/or descriptions of Native peoples.]

Lee, Jason, 1803-1845

Letter from Jason Lee to the Corresponding Secretary of the Missionary Society of the Methodist E. Church, June 1, 1834

Typed letter written by Reverend Jason Lee to the Corresponding Secretary of the Missionary Society of the Methodist E. Church. Written in the Rocky Mountains on July 1, 1834 and published in the Christian Advocate and Journal on September 26, 1834. Letter is titled, "Flat Head Mission." Lee wrote this letter as he traveled on the Oregon Trail to become a missionary in Oregon. Subjects include life on the Oregon Trail, the loss and maintenance of horses, Captain Nathaniel Wyeth, and Lee's observations of local native tribes, including the Sioux, Crow, Snake, and Blackfeet. He also states his views on the importance of missionary work and warns of the potential danger of non-missionary, colonial settlements to the local native populations. [Lee originally intended to do missionary work among the Flathead Indian tribe, but the area where he eventually settled in the Willamette Valley, near present-day Salem, was home to bands of the Kalapuyan people. Lee used language common to justifying the nineteenth century missionary movement, including using disparaging and inaccurate terms and/or descriptions of Native peoples.]

Lee, Jason, 1803-1845

Letter from Jason Lee to the Corresponding Secretary of the Missionary Society of the Methodist E. Church, February 6, 1835

Typed letter written by Reverend Jason Lee to the Corresponding Secretary of the Missionary Society of the Methodist E. Church. Written on the banks of the Willamette River in Oregon on February 6, 1835 and published in the Christian Advocate and Journal on October 30, 1835. Letter is titled, "Flat Head Indians." In this letter, Lee sums up the last leg of his journey on the Oregon Trail, from the Rocky Mountains to Oregon. Subjects include Soda Spring, the Lewis River, Captain Nathaniel Wyeth, and Lee's observations of Native tribes including the Nez Perce, Flathead, Snake, Cayuse, and Wallawalla peoples. He then summarizes his arrival in Vancouver, Washington, his interactions with John McLoughlin, and his subsequent move to the Willamette River, where he built a house. He writes of his observations of the local native tribes, including the Kalapuyan peoples. [Lee originally intended to do missionary work among the Flathead Indian tribe, but the area where he eventually settled in the Willamette Valley, near present-day Salem, was home to bands of the Kalapuyan people. Lee used language common to justifying the nineteenth century missionary movement, including using disparaging and inaccurate terms and/or descriptions of Native peoples.]

Lee, Jason, 1803-1845

Letter from Jason Lee to the Corresponding Secretary of the Missionary Society of the Methodist E. Church, March 14, 1836

Typed letter written by Reverend Jason Lee to the Corresponding Secretary of the Missionary Society of the Methodist E. Church. Written at the Mission House on the Willamette River in Oregon on March 14, 1836 and published in the Christian Advocate and Journal on September 2, 1836. Letter is titled, "Oregon Mission." Subjects include illnesses in the region, the mission's "manual labor school", Lee's support for a temperance society, and John McLoughlin's support for the mission. [Lee used language common to justifying the nineteenth century missionary movement, including using disparaging and inaccurate terms and/or descriptions of Native peoples.]

Lee, Jason, 1803-1845

Letter from Anna Maria Pittman to George Washington Pittman, 1836

Handwritten letter by Anna Maria Pittman to her brother George Washington Pittman. Written in New York on June 9, 1836. Anna wrote this letter as she was preparing to leave her home state of New York to travel by ship to Oregon, where she would join the Oregon Mission. She bids farewell to her brother, who she fears she will never see in person again. She writes of her strong Christian faith, her fears that her brother is not religious, and details of the upcoming voyage on the Ship Hamilton. Anna's signature has been cut out of the bottom of the document. [After arriving in Oregon, Anna Maria Pittman married Reverend Jason Lee.]

Lee, Anna Maria Pittman, 1803-1838

Map of Oregon Territory / by Samuel Parker, 1838

A map depicting the Oregon Territory. The map was drawn to accompany Samuel Parker's book, "Journal of an exploring tour beyond the Rocky Mountains," in 1838. The map shows what is today the Northwestern United States from the Great Lakes Region to the Pacific Coast. The map also shows the general locations of Native American tribal groups. Relief is shown by hachures.

Parker, Samuel, 1779-1866

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