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Gerry Frank scrapbooks and memorabilia

  • Coll 855
  • Colección
  • Circa 1880-2018

Scrapbooks, photograph albums, photographs, papers, and ephemera compiled by or relating to Gerald W. "Gerry" Frank (1923-). Frank is a businessman from Oregon who worked at the department store Meier & Frank; opened a dessert shop in Salem, Oregon, named Gerry Frank's Konditerei; and was U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's chief of staff.

Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church collection, 1940-2015

  • Coll 189
  • Colección
  • 1940 - 2015

The collection covers various aspects of the history of the church and of its leader, Rev. O.B. Williams, and his wife Willa Jackson Williams. It includes a variety of photographs, with a large percentage of the images relating to the various church groups, including choirs, youth groups, and ushers. A large collection of members’ memorial cards, the pastoral anniversaries of Rev. Williams, some bibles and hymnals (many annotated by Rev. Williams, including two dated 1867 and 1890), church financial records and meeting minutes, and a collection of materials from Dr. Martin Luther King’s 1961 visit are included. A small collection of the Williams’ personal photographs and ephemera can also be found in collection.

Sin título

Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest Oral Histories

  • Mss 2988-SR
  • Colección
  • 2000 - 2013

The Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN) was established in Portland, Oregon, by Tom Cook in the early 1990s. Since then the organization has collected archival materials and oral histories from organizations and individuals active in lesbian and gay issues in the Portland area and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Many of these oral histories were gathered by Portland State University students, from the late 90s to present.

June D. Drake photographs

  • Org. Lot 678
  • Colección
  • 1860-1955

Collection consists of approximately 2,918 original photographic prints and 3,800 original glass and acetate negatives taken by photographer June D. Drake of Silverton, Oregon, as well as 3,042 copy prints made by the Oregon Historical Society from the original negatives. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs that Drake took of various towns in Oregon, including Silverton, Mount Angel (including Mount Angel Abbey), and Salem, Oregon, from approximately 1900-1953. These photographs depict street scenes, businesses, schools, churches, and other town buildings, as well as significant events and celebrations. There are also a number of photographs that Drake took of the area that became Silver Falls State Park, as well as a large number of portrait photographs taken by Drake from about 1900-1952, including both studio and informal portraits.

Other subjects represented in the collection include transportation and agriculture in Oregon; the lumber industry around Silverton, including the Silver Falls Timber Company and the Silverton Lumber Company; Homer Davenport and his family in Silverton; the Chemawa Indian School near Silverton, and other portraits of Native Americans from the area; the military in Oregon, including the Oregon State Militia during World War I and World War II; and photographs of animals. The collection also includes five photograph albums; of note is an album titled "A History of Silverton, Oregon, and its environs," which contains detailed descriptions from 1863 to the 1930s, and includes places of business, worship, and study, among other scenes. There are also a number of photographs of various artifacts and other objects collected by Drake to document the history of Silverton.

Photographs in this collection that date prior to 1900 were originally taken by other photographers, including Silverton photographer William L. Jones, and reprinted by June D. Drake, who owned many of Jones's negatives.

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Oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie

  • SR 1936
  • Colección
  • 1999-09-27 - 2001-06-01

This oral history interview with Barbara A. Mackenzie was conducted by Katy Barber at Mackenzie's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 27, 1999, to June 1, 2001. Barbara Mackenzie's son, Thomas R. Mackenzie, and Jan Dilg were also present during the sessions recorded in 2001. The interview was conducted in four sessions. The first part of session one was not recorded.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 27, 1999, Mackenzie discusses working as a teacher in Oregon and California, including working with marginalized groups in the San Francisco Bay Area and opposition she faced. She also talks about her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She speaks about her role in relocating members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes during the building of The Dalles Dam at Celilo Falls. She talks about her relationship with Chief Tommy Thompson and Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people and shares stories about the Wyam way of life. She also talks about her work with Navajo people near Palm Springs, California.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 30, 1999, Mackenzie continues discussing her role in the relocation of members of the Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce tribes. She talks about her relationship with Flora Cushinway Thompson of the Wyam people, some of her advocacy on behalf of indigenous people, and where she felt the local authorities were neglecting indigenous people's needs. She also talks about Temmingway Moses, a Yakama woman who tended a cemetery near the Maryhill Museum in Washington; the attitudes of the population at The Dalles towards Native Americans; and her working relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She talks about Abe Sholoway, a Umatilla man who acted as interpreter; her efforts to get Native American marriages legally recognized; and attending the Pendleton Round-Up. She also talks about the processes of the relocation project and how she got involved. She shares her opinion about assimilation and the U.S. government's practice of tribal termination. She talks about her brother, Ralph Tudor, who served as undersecretary of the Interior under President Dwight D. Eisenhower and worked as an engineer on the Bay Bridge and Bay Area Rapid Transit in the San Francisco Bay Area. She also discusses some of her secretaries and revisits the topics of working as a teacher with marginalized groups in California and her work with the Red Cross in Virginia. She then talks about serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, Oregon.

In the third interview session, conducted on January 16, 2001, Mackenzie discusses her family background and her early life and education in Sutherlin, Oregon. She also talks about the career of her brother, Ralph Tudor. She discusses her education at St. Mary's Academy and at Lincoln High School in Portland, her relationship with her mother, and her first teaching job near Bend. She talks about her college experiences at Western College for Women (now known as the Western Campus of Miami University) and at the Oregon Normal School (now known as Western Oregon University).

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 1, 2001, Mackenzie discusses serving as executive for the Red Cross in Lincoln County, including organizing blood drives and working with veterans. She closes the interview by describing the town of Newport.

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Oral history interview with Lewis L. McArthur

  • SR 2526
  • Colección
  • 2001-01-19 - 2001-02-15

This oral history interview with Lewis L. McArthur was conducted by Sieglinde Smith at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from January 19 to February 15, 2001, as part of the oral history program at the society's research library. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 19, 2001, McArthur discusses his family background and early life in the Green Hills neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, including his education, the house he grew up in, and his recreational activities. He describes the neighborhood and talks about people who lived there. He also speaks about his parents' personalities, travels, and social lives.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 2001, McArthur continues to discuss his early life in the Green Hills neighborhood and talks about his relationship with his parents. He speaks about the work of his father, Lewis A. McArthur, on Oregon Geographic Names and about traveling with him by train in the 1920s for research. He discusses his college experience at the University of California, Berkeley, and talks about working for U.S. Steel Company in the late 1930s. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Army while stationed in Alaska during World War II.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 1, 2001, McArthur speaks further about working for the U.S. Steel Company and about his experiences in the U.S. Army during World War II, including studying Mandarin Chinese. He talks about his marriage to Joyce A. Clark. He then speaks at length about his career as an industrial designer for the Ray F. Becker Company, and talks about products the company produced, about the steel fabrication process, and about buildings the company worked on, particularly gas stations. He talks about how Oregon has changed during the 20th century, particularly regarding housing development, transportation, and power generation.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 8, 2001, McArthur shares his memories of the Columbia River before the construction of hydroelectric dams, and talks about how the Columbia River Gorge changed. He briefly discusses serving on the state advisory committee on historic preservation in the 1970s, and then talks about his recreational activities on Mount Hood, including climbing and camping on the mountain, and repairing the Snowshoe Cabin, the Cloud Cap Inn, and other buildings.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 15, 2001, McArthur discusses his role models, including his family members, and talks about construction projects that impressed him, including dams on the Columbia River and the Bay Bridge in California. He also speaks about mapmaking. He shares his childhood memories of attending meetings of the Pioneer Association, riding the streetcar, and traveling with his family. He compares travel by various modes of transportation, particularly air and rail. He revisits the topic of his father's work on Oregon Geographic Names, then speaks at length about his own work on later editions of the book and about his service on the state advisory committee on historic preservation. He describes his favorite places in Oregon, and talks about raising a family.

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Oral history interview with Norma Paulus

  • SR 3972
  • Colección
  • 1999-02-10 - 2000-11-02

This oral history interview with Norma Paulus was conducted by Clark Hansen at Paulus's home in Salem, Oregon, in Lincoln City, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon; and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from February 10, 1999, to November 2, 2000, and from February 10 to 27, 2010. In the interview, Paulus discusses her family background and early life in Burns, Oregon, including life during World War II and contracting polio at the age of 19. She also discusses working as a secretary for the Harney County district attorney, Leland Beckham; moving to Salem to work for a law firm; working for Judge Earl Latourette; and going to law school. Paulus describes meeting Bill Paulus while attending law school; his family background; and their marriage. Paulus discusses her involvement with the Republican Party; working as an appellate lawyer for the Oregon Supreme Court; working on Wally Carson's campaign for the Oregon Legislature in 1965; and getting her first political appointment, to the Marion County Boundary Commission, where she focused on land-use and city planning issues. She focuses on managing a career in law and politics while raising two young children and building a house.

She then discusses her time in the Oregon House of Representatives, from 1970 to 1976, including environmental issues such as the Bottle Bill of 1971 and recycling; education; the criminal code; taxes; attempts to make Cape Kiwanda a state park; and the Rajneeshees. Paulus goes into detail about the women's caucus and the bills they focused on for women's rights, as well as efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. She describes working with Bob Smith, Paul Hanneman, Betty Roberts, Stafford Hansell, Jack Anunsen, Wally Priestly, Dick Eymann, Lynn Newbry, Glenn Jackson, Jason Boe, and Gretchen Kafoury. She also talks about being co-chair for Clay Myers' 1974 race for Oregon governor.

Paulus goes on to speak about her time as Oregon's first woman secretary of state from 1977 to 1985, including her first campaign in 1976 against Blaine Whipple; her efforts to increase voter turnout; and conducting audits, particularly of the Forestry Department. She also discusses the secretary of state's role as state archivist and the conflict between the Oregon State Archives and the Oregon Historical Society over which records belong with which institution. She also discusses working with Governor Vic Atiyeh. Paulus discusses running for governor against Neil Goldschmidt in 1986 and the challenges her campaign faced. She discusses her position on the Northwest Power Planning Council from 1987 to 1990, including working with Ted Hallock and Bob Duncan. She also discusses her position as Oregon superintendent of public instruction from 1990 to 1999, including her efforts to fund K-12 education. Paulus also relates a story about sharing an airplane with Moshe Dayan.

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Oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland

  • SR 11131
  • Colección
  • 2000-03-11

This oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland was conducted by an unidentified woman on March 11, 2000. In this interview, Sweetland discusses moving to Milwaukie, Oregon, around 1949. He discusses his purchase of the Milwaukie Review newspaper, the houses he and his young family lived in, and life in the Island Station neighborhood. He talks about his children, their early education, their families, and their careers. He talks about his neighbors, including Milwaukie Mayor Joy Burges, as well as the changes in the neighborhood. He also speaks at length about growing lilacs and camellias. He talks about the livability of the Island Station neighborhood. Sweetland and the interviewer discuss the upcoming Milwaukie High School reunion. He goes on to talk about his wife, Lil Megrath, her involvement in progressive politics, and her government career. He also briefly discusses his family background. Sweetland then returns to discussing his children. He speaks at length about urban wildlife, particularly nutria, Canadian geese, and foxes, as well as Kellogg Creek in Milwaukie, particularly regarding its fish and clam populations.

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Oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton

  • SR 1076
  • Colección
  • 1991-09-10 - 1991-12-13

This oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton was conducted by Nancy Hawver from September 10 to December 13, 1991, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 10, 1991, Thornton discusses her family background and early life in Tillamook, Oregon, including her parents' involvement with the Tillamook Creamery Association. She talks about her early education, her recreational activities, and her early interest in art. She discusses a trip she took to Europe in 1935. She talks about her experiences in high school and at the University of Oregon. She also revisits the topics of the Tillamook Creamery Association and her early life in Tillamook. She discusses her marriage to Robert Y. Thornton and talks about his legal and political career.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 17, 1991, Thornton discusses her experience during World War II and talks about working in the blimp factory in Tillamook. She also talks about Robert Y. Thornton's service in the U.S. Army during the war. She discusses Robert Y. Thornton's study of Japanese and her own study of art. She then discusses living in Tillamook at the end of the war, talks about her involvement in the Tillamook Library Board, and about raising her son, Thomas Wells Thornton.

In the third interview session, conducted on November 22, 1991, Thornton discusses living in Salem after Robert Y. Thornton was elected to the Oregon State Legislature in 1950 and talks about her experiences as a wife of a politician, her involvement with the Bush House Auxiliary, and her interest in art and photography. She also talks about cases Robert Y. Thornton worked on as state attorney general.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on December 13, 1991, Thornton continues to discuss living in Salem, including her involvement in early childhood education. She also continues to discuss Robert Y. Thornton's career as state attorney general. She talks about her involvement in the Arts in Oregon Council and other arts organizations; describes her cornea transplant surgery; and discusses taking art classes. She talks about a trip she took to Japan in the late 1950s, about attending attorneys general conventions, and about the establishment of the Grove of the States in 1967. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement with the Portland Art Museum and other arts organizations.

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Oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse

  • SR 1713
  • Colección
  • 1991-01-15 - 1991-02-20

This oral history interview with Zennah M. Buse was conducted by Susan L. Smith in West Linn, Oregon, from January 15 to February 20, 1991. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 15, 1991, Buse discusses her family background and childhood in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her elementary school education, and her recreational activities. She describes life in West Linn during the early 20th century and talks about attending Territorial Days picnics.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 23, 1991, Buse discusses her teenage years in West Linn, Oregon, including life on a farm, her high school education, and her recreational activities. She talks about her wedding and marriage to Herman Richard Buse. She discusses raising a family in West Linn, and talks about family and holiday traditions; shares her memories of her activities during World War II; and talks about her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about her health, about her involvement in clubs and organizations, and about growing vegetables. She also revisits the topic of her childhood and describes the foods she ate, the process of doing laundry, and the clothes she wore.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on February 20, 1991, Buse revisits the topic of her marriage to Herman Richard Buse and raising a family in West Linn. She talks about camping with her family, shares the history of places and landmarks in West Linn, and describes how the city has changed over her life. She closes the interview by talking about the Romani people who would come to West Linn in the summers.

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Oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis

  • SR 801
  • Colección
  • 1991-01-29

This oral history interview with Lynette K. McGinnis was conducted by Linda Watkins on January 29, 1991. In this interview, McGinnis discusses her family background and early life in Utah, particularly the life history of her father, William Jasper Kerr. She talks about Kerr's time as president of Brigham Young College, now Brigham Young University; the family's involvement with the Mormon Church; and her memories of her father's uncle, Utah Senator Joseph Lafayette Rawlins. She discusses her social life and her family life, and describes the town of Logan, Utah. She speaks about leaving the Mormon Church.

McGinnis discusses moving to Corvallis, Oregon, in 1907, where her father, William Jasper Kerr, served as president of the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University. She describes their house, her education, and her social life. She also talks about her pet dog. She speaks about William Jasper Kerr's career and Oregon Agricultural College campus life. She discusses studying at the Wilson-Greene School of Music in Washington, D.C. in 1913. She then talks about James Luther McGinnis, their marriage, and his family. She discusses living in Reno, Nevada, during the 1920s, and in Spokane, Washington, during the Depression. She also talks about teaching music. She revisits the topic of William Jasper Kerr's service as president of Oregon Agricultural College. She talks about her son, his career, and his family. She reflects on how the world and technology have changed during her lifetime; talks about her travels; and speaks about her grandchildren. She discusses her career as a musician and music teacher, her Christian faith, and her hopes for the future. She also talks more about her travels. She closes the interview by discussing her memories of her family.

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Yasui Brothers business records

  • Mss 2949
  • Colección
  • 1904 - 1990

The Yasui Brothers records primarily document the business, personal, and community-related activities of the Yasui family in Hood River, Oregon, from the start of the 20th century until World War II, when they were among the more than 120,000 Japanese Americans incarcerated by the U.S. government.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence and records relating to the business activities of Masuo Yasui (1886-1957). These include the general store, Yasui Bros., that he ran with his brother Renichi Fujimoto; and orchards in the Hood River Valley and surrounding areas that the firm operated. Store records include a variety of advertising materials, while farming records include packing lists, crop reports, and records of local farming associations Masuo Yasui was involved with. The collection also reflects Yasui’s involvement in the local community, including his work assisting other Japanese immigrants to the United States. A small quantity of materials relates to the Yasui Bros. store’s forced closure and the management of the family’s property and assets while they were incarcerated during World War II.

The collection also includes personal papers of Masuo Yasui; his wife, Shidzuyo Yasui; his brother Renichi Fujimoto; and his children. These consist of correspondence, ephemera, and a personal history that Masuo Yasui wrote at the request of the Japanese consulate. Other materials in the collection include records from the 1970s and 1980s of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL), in which Masuo Yasui’s son Homer Yasui and his wife, Miyuki Yasui, were active, and magazines and newspapers the family received in both Japanese and English.

A substantial amount of this collection is in a pre-World War II Japanese script that is distinct from modern Japanese. Some of these materials, particularly those in Series 1 (Business correspondence and related materials) and Series 6 (Personal papers) have been reviewed and summarized by translators. Selected documents have been translated into English and modern Japanese.

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The Video Access Project video recordings

  • MIC 8
  • Colección
  • 1971-1990

The Video Access Project (TVAP) recordings consist of over 800 3/4" Umatic Video tapes and 1/2" Open Reel video tapes, most produced in the Portland Community Access facilities from the early 1980s into the 1990s. These programs were mainly produced and recorded in a television studio and covered various Portland related topics, including politics, music, art and social services. The collection also contains earlier video recordings that were not produced by TVAP. These videos, from the 1970s, were shot on location (not in a studio) and are more focused on art, sexuality, performance and neighborhoods in transition.

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Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs photographs, 1953-1988.

  • Org. Lot 587
  • Colección
  • 1953 - 1988

Photographs and other materials that were assembled for the Northwest Black Heritage exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society, documenting the history and activities of the Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs and its constituent groups. The photographs depict the presidents of the Oregon Association of Colored Women's Clubs, including Katherine Gray, the association's first president; state and regional conventions; affiliated clubs; community service activities; winners of the association's Katherine Gray Memorial Scholarship; and federated girls' clubs associated with the organization. Also included is a photograph of the exhibit panel and photocopies of newspaper clippings and other materials used in the exhibit panel.

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Oral history interview with Howard C. Reed

  • SR 172
  • Colección
  • 1988-07-30

This oral history interview with Howard C. Reed was conducted by an unidentified man on July 30, 1988. In this interview, Reed discusses a giant brown trout that was caught at Paulina Lake in 1965, which weighed 35 pounds, 9 ounces. He also talks about the history of Paulina Lake Lodge, which his family had owned since 1929.

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Oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford

  • SR 1500
  • Colección
  • 1987-11-28 - 1987-12-18

This oral history interview with Malcolm M. Crawford was conducted by Pat Bleakney at Crawford's home in The Dalles, Oregon, from November 28 to December 18, 1987, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in two sessions. An unidentified woman was also present during session 2 and contributed to the interview questions.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 28, 1987, Crawford discusses the history of the Dalles, Oregon. He speaks at length about his family background of homesteading in The Dalles, as well as his early life there. He talks about his education in a one-room schoolhouse; discusses the people who lived in The Dalles during the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and talks about his ranch. He also talks about railroad lines, roads, and fences in the area.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 18, 1987, Crawford, Bleakney, and an unidentified woman drive and walk around The Dalles and talk about the history of the land, animals, roads, and buildings as they pass. They also walk along the Dalles Mountain Ranch Loop Hike and talk about the history of the area. Crawford then speaks about his life on a ranch in The Dalles. He also shares his memories of Celilo Falls before it was flooded by The Dalles Dam.

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Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins

  • SR 470
  • Colección
  • 1986-07-07 - 1986-08-01

This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins' office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father's career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice lawsuits, as well as his family life.

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J.H. Horner Papers, 1889-1985

  • Mss 6031
  • Colección
  • 1889 - 1985

The collection consists principally of the typescript (with corrections in hand) of Horner's work, Wallowa River and Valley, dealing with regional history, as well as the Nez Percé Indians. Other papers include correspondence (ca. 1889-1985); legal documents (1898-1931); patents for window construction (1921-1922); and manuscript materials (undated). Horner's main correspondent is Otis Halfmoon, a Catholic Nez Percé who assisted with the author's manuscript. The collection also includes a list of other contributors that assisted Horner in his research

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Oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow

  • SR 1071
  • Colección
  • 1985-08-22 - 1985-09-26

This oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow was conducted by Bill Koen at Furrow's home near Odell, Oregon, from August 22 to September 26, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 22, 1985, Furrow discusses her family background, particularly regarding her grandfather, Peter Mohr, who owned the first commercial orchard in Hood River, Oregon. She describes daily life on the family orchard and dairy farm in Hood River. She talks about working as a fruit packer for Nakamura Orchards.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 26, 1985, Furrow shares her observations of the treatment of the Japanese community in Hood River during World War II, and describes racial discrimination in Hood River. She revisits the topic of daily life on her family's orchard and dairy farm in Hood River, and talks about the gendered division of labor. She describes her work picking and packing fruit for Nakamura Orchards. She talks about the ranch she ran with her husband, William Henry Furrow, and discusses selling their fruit through Diamond Fruit Growers Inc. She discusses the future of small farms in Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her involvement in the Hood River County Historical Society.

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Oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider

  • SR 1075
  • Colección
  • 1985-04-18 - 1985-04-25

This oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider was conducted by Rick Harmon at the Schneiders' home in Portland, Oregon, from April 18-25, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 18, 1985, the Schneider brothers discuss their family history and early life in Portland. They speak at length about their first family home in Southeast Portland and they describe the appliances and utilities the house had in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They then describe the family home that they moved to in 1910. They also talk about the jobs they held, their education, and their recreational activities. They share their memories of Oaks Amusement Park, of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, and of the early Portland Rose Festival parades.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 25, 1985, the Schneider brothers continue to discuss their early life in Portland, including their recreational activities, their involvement with the Catholic Church, and their education. They also talk about their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company. They then discuss their experiences serving in the U.S. Army during World War I. Nicholas Schneider also talks about experiencing anti-German and anti-Catholic discrimination. They close the interview by revisiting the topic of their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company.

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Joel Palmer Papers, 1783-1982

  • Mss 114
  • Colección
  • 1783-1982

The papers consist of four groups of materials acquired by the Oregon Historical Society at various times. The first group, designated Mss 114, consists of correspondence (1848-1869) concerning the conduct of Indian affairs in Oregon, enlistment of a state militia, and efforts to establish a Union League Council. Correspondents include Benjamin Alvord, Jesse Applegate, Benjamin Bonneville, Samuel Culver, Addison C. Gibbs, and Joseph Lane. Also included is a diary (1857) kept by Palmer while on a voyage from Oregon City to Washington, D.C. via Panama; typescript copies of diaries (1854, 1856, 1860-1861) recording his travels throughout the Pacific Northwest; hand written copy of an agreement (1854) between the United States, represented by superintendent of Indian Affairs, Joel Palmer, and the Calipooia Indian tribe; and articles of incorporation (1862) of the Columbia River Railroad Company.

The second group of materials, designated Mss 114-1, consists of letters sent to Sarah Ann Palmer from various relatives, and receipts and other ephemera of Joel Palmer. Among these are hand written copies of poems dated 1783, possibly from one of Palmer's ancestors.

The third group within the collection, designated Mss 114-2, contains mostly biographical information about Palmer, along with letters written by his descendants and letters relating to the dedication of a statue of Palmer in 1971.

A fourth group of papers, designated Mss 114-3, consists of general correspondence, primarily political and military in nature, legal papers, and a survey of an unidentified Indian reservation.

The final group of materials, designated Mss 114-4, includes a manuscript poem, Bristol, England, 1784; letters from Palmer to General Joseph Lane and others; manuscript copy of report to the U.S. Secretary of War or the Commissioner of Indian Affairs from General Joseph Lane, ca. 1849; a letter from W. B. Bonney to Joel Palmer, 1850 Jan. 17; letter to Joel Palmer from Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Bonneville, 1855 Mar. 27; printed copy of the treaty between the United States and the Rogue River Indians, 1855; manuscript extracts from "Articles of treatry made at Port Orford," 1857 Sept. 20; hand drawn map of the Columbia River and its tributaries, undated; and a pamphlet titled "History of the Grand Ronde Military Block House," 1911.

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Tim Smith films

  • MIC 9
  • Colección
  • 1962-1982

The collection contains satirical and comedic short films and early film experiments by Portland, Oregon, filmmaker Tim Smith. The collection includes 9 complete films (three on one reel) and one reel of assorted home movies, experiments and outtakes. The collection includes the following titles: "The Orange"; "Irritation and Frustration"; "Come and Get it"; "The Salmon Street Saga"; "This is Portland"; "Drugs: Killers or Dillers"; "The Case of the Kitchen Killer"; "Infernal Voyage"; "Hyperactivity: The Facts." All films are 16mm. The collection also includes various picture and audio production elements for some films, including A and B rolls, magnetic soundtracks, answer prints, negatives, and assorted lab and printing paperwork.

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Oregon Black History Project records

  • Mss 2854
  • Colección
  • 1844-1981

The Oregon Black History Project was a grant-funded project that conducted research on the history of African-Americans in Oregon up to the beginning of World War II. The project was directed by Elizabeth McLagan and culminated in her book "A Peculiar Paradise: A History of Blacks in Oregon, 1788-1940," which was published by the Georgian Press of Portland, Oregon, in 1980.

The collection consists of administrative records, research files, and photographs gathered or created by the Oregon Black History Project. Most of the research files consist of notes and quotes, photocopies, or excerpts from primary and secondary resources concerning the history of African-Americans in Oregon from the late 18th century to the mid-20th century. Most of these source excerpts were assembled between 1976 and 1979. Topics include early African-American emigrants to Oregon; the slavery debate in Oregon; exclusion laws and other forms of discrimination or violence against African-Americans; African-American business, social, and activist organizations; and early 20th-century African-American newspapers such as The Advocate, the New Age, and the Portland Times.

Photographs include portraits of African-American Oregonians; African-American social groups and activities; residences; and businesses operated by African-Americans in Portland, Oregon. Some of the photographs are copies of images originally published in newspapers such as Portland Times and The Advocate.

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Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series

  • SR Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series
  • Colección
  • 1981?

A series of lectures given by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen on the importance of preserving the Columbia River Gorge.

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Oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton

  • SR 9596
  • Colección
  • 1981-10-27

This oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Tigard, Oregon, on October 27, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Dalton discusses her family background and early life on Government Island, Oregon, including life on the family ranch, transportation, and recreational activities. She talks about other families that lived on the island, describes her experience during the 1894 flood, and discusses daily life on the island. She discusses her education and the ferry to Washougal, Washington. Dalton describes meeting her husband, Louis Stanis Dalton, and briefly talks about their marriage and family life. She closes the interview by talking about mail service on Government Island.

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Oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman

  • SR 9042
  • Colección
  • 1981-09-17

This oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Eugene, Oregon, on September 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Freeman discusses her early life on a farm in Colton, Oregon; attending Oregon State University; and working as a math teacher in Oregon and California. She then talks about settling in Eugene after her marriage to Neil Freeman, and about teaching mathematics at the University of Oregon from 1943 to 1949. She discusses how her involvement in Lane County politics began with a Democratic speechwriting contest in which she took second place, losing to future U. S. Rep. Edith Green. She talks about serving as precinct committee chair, her involvement with the League of Women Voters, and running for the Oregon Legislature in 1952. She discusses her reasons for joining the Democratic Party and her campaign for Lane County treasurer. She speaks at length about her accomplishments as treasurer. Freeman talks about feeling as if the county commissioners didn't hold the office of treasurer in high esteem and how that pushed her to run for Lane County clerk in 1960. She discusses her accomplishments as county clerk, then describes how the office of county clerk was changed to an appointed position rather than elected, which led to her losing the position. She closes the interview by talking about her activities during retirement, including freelance writing.

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Oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler

  • SR 44-1
  • Colección
  • 1981-02-27

This oral history interview with Rose Iva Dalton and Peggy Wetzler was conducted at the home of Peggy Wetzler. The first session was conducted by Bernice Pluchos of the Camas-Washougal Historical Society on February 27, 1981, and the second session was conducted by Peggy Wetzler on February 28, 1981. The sound quality is extremely poor.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 27, 1981, Dalton discusses her family background and early life on Government Island, Oregon, including life on the family ranch, transportation, and her social life. She also briefly talks about her wedding to Louis Stanis Dalton in 1907. Wetzler also discusses her family background and early life in Long Beach, Washington.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 28, 1981, Dalton continues discussing her early life on Government Island, including her education, other families that lived on the island, and floods. She also describes the house she lived in. Wetzler and Dalton talk about taking ferry boats to and from Government Island, catching crabs on the beach, and life in Long Beach, Washington. Wetzler closes the tape with a brief narrative of Rose Iva Dalton's family history and additional historical information about Government Island and Long Beach.

Sin título

Oral history interview with Nancy E. Stevens

  • SR 9386
  • Colección
  • 1981-01-29

This oral history interview with Nancy E. Stevens was conducted by Dale Archibald, Susan Horton, and Robert Keeler at Blue Lake Regional Park in Fairview, Oregon, on January 29, 1981. Susan Horton was also recording video at the time of the interview.

In this interview, Stevens directs a driving tour of Blue Lake Park. She uses a 1930 U.S. Geographic Survey map to point out the former locations of buildings, piers, and Native sites. She talks about her childhood on the land when it was owned by her family, including fishing in the lake and people who lived in the area. They all also discuss Multnomah County's plans for the park.

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