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Vanport Flood photographs

Photographs of the damage caused by the Vanport Flood in May 1948 taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, Oregon.

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Oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada

This oral history interview with Tatsuro Yada was conducted by Taka Mizote on March 8, 1992. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon.

In this interview, Yada discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Salem, Oregon. He talks about the Japanese community in Salem, his education, and attending Japanese school. He speaks about returning home to take over the family farm after graduating from Willamette University. He discusses his involvement in the Civil Defense Corps before the United States joined World War II; talks about his reaction to the attack on Pearl Harbor; and describes the Japanese-owned businesses in the Salem area. He talks about his incarceration at Tule Lake Relocation Center during World War II. He describes living conditions in the camp, his role as a teacher, and the military service of his siblings. He talks about getting out of the camp less than a year later to work at a hotel in Nebraska, while his parents were incarcerated at the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho. He then talks about returning to the family farm after the government ended incarceration of Japanese Americans in 1945. He discusses his marriage to Masako Onishi, his Christian faith, and the Japanese American community in post-war Salem. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He discusses his retirement activities, including farming, as well as his hopes for the future. He closes the interview by discussing serving on the Salem-Keizer School Board.

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Oral history interview with Frankie Bell

This oral history interview with Frankie Bell was conducted by Vinita Howard from November 12-30, 1992. In this interview, Bell discusses her family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon. She discusses her education and attending the University of Oregon. She talks about the difficulty of starting a family while still attending college and trying to have a career. She discusses the various part-time jobs she held until she began working at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, in 1966 as a tour guide. She talks about working at the information desk at the Oregon Legislature from 1967 to the time of the interview in 1992, including facing sexism on the job. She describes her observations on the Legislature over her two and a half decades there, including on lobbyists, rumors, and inaugural changes. She also talks about the history of the Capitol building, as well as organizing holidays and exhibits at the building; the gift shop; and school tours. She closes the interview by speaking briefly about the personalities of many legislators over the years.

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Oral history interview with John D. Weisinger

This oral history interview with John D. Weisinger was conducted by Jamie Minkus and Kirsten Wall on May 24, 2002. The interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Wine Archives Oral History Project, which collected interviews with notable figures in the wine-growing industry, including vintners, vineyard growers, community members, and workers active in the development of Oregon's wine industry. The sound quality of this interview is extremely poor, and much of it is inaudible.

In this interview, Weisinger discusses the history of the area around the Weisinger Winery in Ashland, Oregon, and shares the reasons that he chose the site to purchase in 1978. He also talks about his family history of winemaking, then speaks about the early years of his winery, including the process of planting his first grapes. He discusses the wine industry in Oregon, and talks about the Oregon Winegrowers Association and the market for Oregon wines. He closes the interview by talking about the future of the Oregon wine industry, and shares his thoughts about how climate change will affect winegrowers.

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Oral history interview with Bill Fuller

This oral history interview with Bill Fuller was conducted by Jamie Minkus and Kirsten Wall in Portland, Oregon, on January 24, 2002. The interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Wine Archives Oral History Project, which collected interviews with notable figures in the wine-growing industry, including vintners, vineyard growers, community members, and workers active in the development of Oregon's wine industry. A transcript is also available.

In this interview, Fuller discusses his early experience with winemaking at the Italian Swiss Colony in Santa Rosa, California. He shares the reasons why he and fellow winemaker Bill Malkmus chose the area of Forest Grove, Oregon, to establish their winery, Tualatin Vineyards; talks about the types of grapes they grew; and discusses the first wines they made in the 1970s. He speaks about his involvement with the Oregon Winegrowers Association and talks about wine labeling legislation the organization lobbied for. He talks about the growth of the Oregon wine industry and market since the 1970s, and how it changed during the 1980s. He also talks about winning best of show at the International Wine and Spirits Competition with a Pinot Noir and a Chardonnay in the same year. He discusses his partnership with Bill Malkmus; talks about his children and their careers; and closes the interview by sharing his winemaking philosophy.

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Gertrude Glutsch Jensen speech on preservation of the Columbia River Gorge

This speech was delivered by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen on May 28, 1981, to an unknown audience. She repeats remarks made to the Portland Women's Forum at the Western Forestry Center in Portland, Oregon, on May 5, 1981. A person identified only as Mr. Short delivers introductory remarks. Jensen discusses the history of Columbia River Gorge conservation efforts by the Portland Women’s Forum and the Columbia Gorge Commission. She advocates immediate action by way of a presidential proclamation to designate the Gorge as a national monument; reads a letter she received from former Oregon Governor Oswald West regarding the Gorge; and talks about her friendship with conservationist Horace M. Albright. She presents arguments in favor of proposed legislation to designate the Gorge as a National Recreation Area. Jensen closes the speech by talking about the 1937 Columbia River Gorge Commission report, and Short makes closing remarks.

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Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd

This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

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Oral history interview with Donald Dickey

This oral history interview with Donald Dickey was conducted by Neil Vanderburg and Bob Zybach at the Green Valley Care Center in Eugene, Oregon, from August 18-19, 1990. The interview was conducted as part of the Soap Creek Valley History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon State University Research Forests to better understand the history, ecology, and culture of the Soap Creek Valley in Benton County, Oregon. Maxine Ann Dickey was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 18, 1990, Dickey discusses his family background and early life in Berry Creek, in the Soap River Valley area of Oregon, including his memories of snowstorms, life on the family farm, and other families that lived in the area. He also briefly discusses his 35-year career in rodent control for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 19, 1990, Dickey describes the wildlife in the Berry Creek area, his recreational activities and social life, and people and places in neighboring towns. He speaks at length about the sawmills in the area. He then revisits the topic of his 35-year career in rodent control for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He closes the interview by discussing his marriage.

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Oral history interview with Lorna Grabe

This oral history interview with Lorna Grabe was conducted by Bob Zybach at Grabe's home in Corvallis, Oregon, on December 28, 1989. The interview was conducted as part of the Soap Creek Valley History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon State University Research Forests to better understand the history, ecology, and culture of the Soap Creek Valley in Benton County, Oregon.

In this interview, Grabe discusses her family background and early life in Iowa City, Iowa. She then talks about her marriage to Don Grabe and about his career, and she describes how they came to live in Corvallis, Oregon, in 1968. She describes life in the Soap Creek Valley area, including other families in the area and recreational activities, particularly bird watching. She speaks at length about her involvement in the Soap Creek Schoolhouse Foundation, including the history of the foundation, the preservation work it has sponsored for the schoolhouse, and other members of the foundation. She also speaks about the use of wildflowers in its landscaping and discusses the story of a ghost haunting a barn in the area. She closes the interview by talking about the Soap Creek Schoolhouse Foundation's accomplishments and plans for the future, and by discussing the changes in the Soap Creek Valley from 1968 to the time of the interview in 1989.

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Oral history interview with Jim Tsugawa

This oral history interview with Jim Tsugawa was conducted by Sankar Raman and Elizabeth Mehren on July 19, 2018. Amy Tsugawa, Jim Tsugawa's wife, was also present and contributed at the end of the interview. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Jim Tsugawa discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He describes his experience of being incarcerated by the U.S. government, including his family's detention at the Portland Livestock Pavilion and transfer to the Minidoka War Relocation Camp in Idaho. He also discusses his older brother Henry Tsugawa's military service during World War II. He talks about his family being sponsored by a reverend for residency in Boise, Idaho, and briefly describes his childhood there. He talks about the family renting a strawberry farm in Ontario, Oregon, and his high school experience in Beaverton, Oregon, particularly his interest in sports. He speaks briefly about attending Lewis & Clark College on a sports scholarship, then discusses his experience in the U.S. Army and being stationed in Zweibrücken, Germany, during the Korean War. He talks about studying at Oregon State University after his discharge, and about earning his degree in dentistry from the University of Oregon Dental School, which is now part of Oregon Health & Science University. He then briefly speaks about his marriage to Amy Goda, now Amy Tsugawa, her family background, and her experience of incarceration by the U.S. government during World War II. He discusses the U.S. political climate at the time of the interview in 2018, particularly the Trump administration's immigration policies. Mehren and Tsugawa discuss the large Asian populations in California and Hawaii. Tsugawa describes a recent trip to the Minidoka National Historic Site and revisits the topics of his childhood and playing sports. Amy Tsugawa closes the interview by talking about spending her teenage years in postwar Japan.

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Oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson

This oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson was conducted by Jeffrey C. Dobbins in Salem, Oregon, from August 21 to December 11, 2007, as part of the United States District Court of Oregon Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in thirteen sessions. Throughout the interview, Peterson refers to photographs and letters. Copies of some, but not all, of these items are included in the related U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society collection, Coll 560.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 21, 2007, Peterson discusses his family background in Gilmanton, Wisconsin, including the local creamery managed by his father; his childhood activities; and his early education. He also talks about his memories of rural life during World War II.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 28, 2007, Peterson continues to discuss his early life in Gilmanton, and his memories of life during World War II. He then discusses having asthma and moving to Oregon in 1944 in an effort to improve his health. He looks at photographs of his home and family in Gilmanton and discusses them.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 4, 2007, Peterson discusses his high school experience in Eugene, Oregon. He talks about studying music at the University of Oregon, including his social life and his summer activities.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on September 11, 2007, Peterson continues to discuss his college experiences at the University of Oregon, including his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes his service as a personnel officer in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, particularly his experience in administration. He shares his memories of the Cold War.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on September 18, 2007, Peterson discusses attending the University of Oregon Law School. He talks about the dean, Orlando Hollis; his social life; and his summer jobs. He talks about relocating to Portland to practice law at Tooze, Kerr, Peterson, Marshall & Shenker.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on September 25, 2007, Peterson discusses practicing law in Portland. He speaks at length about cases he tried, about fellow lawyers, and about judges he argued before. He particularly focuses on trial preparation and procedures.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on October 9, 2007, Peterson speaks further about University of Oregon Law School Dean Orlando Hollis, then continues to discuss practicing law in Portland. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, and his friendship with Clay Myers.

In the eighth interview session, conducted on October 16, 2007, Peterson continues to discuss practicing law in Portland. He reflects on his career as a lawyer, talks about cases he worked on, and discusses settling out of court. He shares an anecdote about his appointment to the Oregon Supreme Court in 1979.

In the ninth interview session, conducted on October 23, 2007, Peterson discusses the procedures of the Multnomah County Circuit Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals, and talks about judges who served on those courts. He also shows the interviewer, Jeffrey Dobbins, his collection of photographs and speaks about them at length.

In the tenth interview session, conducted on October 30, 2007, Peterson continues to discuss his photograph collection. He then speaks about his service as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993. He describes his fellow justices on the court. He discusses the procedures of the Supreme Court, cases he heard, and his re-election in 1980.

In the eleventh interview session, conducted on November 6, 2007, Peterson continues to discuss his service as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993. He talks about serving as chief justice from 1983 to 1991, including implementing an integrated court system, the court's budget, and the court's staff. He reads entries from his journals detailing this part of his career.

In the twelfth interview session, conducted on November 13, 2007, Peterson continues to discuss his service as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993, and serving as chief justice from 1983 to 1991. He talks about implementing the uniform trial court rules. He also discusses the changes in technology, rules of professionalism, and diversity training. He reads additional entries from his journals detailing this part of his career.

In the thirteenth and final interview session, conducted on December 11, 2007, Peterson closes the interview by talking about his activities since retiring in 1993, including teaching at the Willamette University Law School and working as a mediator.

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Agriculture and animals

Photographs related to agriculture, horticulture, and animals from approximately 1920 - 1945. The bulk of the photographs depict people, animals, and scenes at fairs and livestock shows, probably the Multnomah County Fair in Gresham, Oregon, and the Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland, Oregon. Other images depict topics such as cats, dogs, wild birds, poultry, and Tusko the elephant; farms and farmland; flowers, flower shows, and gardens.

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Manuscript of Wallowa River and Valley

An unfinished typescript with hand corrections of J. H. Horner’s work, Wallowa River and Valley. The manuscript details the history of the Wallowa Valley region in northeastern Oregon from approximately 1805 through 1950. The document includes extensive details on the origins of many place names in the region. The manuscript also includes a history of the Nez Percé people and their cultural traditions which Horner wrote in collaboration with Otis Halfmoon. Topics covered in the manuscript include Chief Joseph and the events of the Nez Percé war of 1877, settlement of the Wallowa Valley region, and local participation in World War I and World War II. John Harland Horner (1870-1953) was born in Kansas City, Missouri, and moved to Enterprise, Oregon, in 1911. He served as Wallowa County's deputy assessor from 1918 to 1924, before being elected county assessor in 1924. Horner also had a long-standing interest in the history of Wallowa County. For more than thirty years, he collected historical information and interviewed most of the area's early settlers and local Native Americans.

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Columbia Steel Casting Company

This series contains photographs of steelworkers and equipment detailing the steel casting process used for making large steel components for Liberty Ships constructed in Portland (Or.) area shipyards during World War II.

Supplemental descriptive information contributed in 2019 by Chris Horn, Facilities Director for Columbia Steel.

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Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman

This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman's offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield's staff; discusses other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and talks about how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator's stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield's personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration's push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield's efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield's real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield's political career.

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Oral history interview with Helen G. Rees

This oral history interview with Helen G. Rees was conducted by Anne Cummins at Rees' home in Fairview, Oregon, on December 13, 1995. The interview was conducted as part of the Rural Telephone Operators Oral History Series, which was a series of interviews about telephone operators in rural areas in the early 20th century, conducted by Anne Cummins in the early 1990s.

In this interview, Rees discusses her family background and early life in Sherman County. She also talks about the family background of William A. Rees and his early life in Shaniko. Rees then discusses her life in Shaniko after her marriage to William A. Rees. She speaks at length about the telephone system in Shaniko in the 1930s and early 1940s, describing how the system worked and the equipment used, and she talks about some of the telephone operators. She closes the interview by talking about the different ways the operators served the community beyond the job of answering and directing phone calls.

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Northwest School of Photography

Photographs taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, Oregon. They include photographs of the processing lab and students in classes as well as portraits taken by the students.

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Oral history interview with Edward Leavy

This oral history interview with Edward Leavy was conducted by Clark Hansen in Leavy's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse (known as the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse) in Portland, Oregon, from March 2 to April 13, 2004. The portion of the interview conducted on March 30, 2004 (Tapes 10 through 12) appears to have been simultaneously recorded on audiocassette and video. In the audio recording, the parties make reference to the video recording, which is not included in this collection.

In this interview, Leavy discusses his family background and early life on a hops farm in Butteville, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending the University of Portland and studying at Notre Dame Law School, including his reasons for attending Catholic schools. He also speaks about how his faith informs his morality and judicial decisions, particularly regarding the Fifth Amendment. He discusses serving as a deputy district attorney for Lane County and some of the cases he prosecuted. He reflects at length upon the byzantine workings of the justice system, its strengths and weaknesses, and a judge's role within it.

Leavy discusses his election to the positions of Lane County District Court judge and Circuit Court judge, as well as the elections of other judges in Oregon. He talks about some of the cases he heard and some decisions of his that were reversed. He speaks at length about many of the judges he knew, including Ted Goodwin and Otto Skopil. He discusses the differences between state and federal courts. Leavy describes the magistrate system during the years he was a U.S. Magistrate for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He then speaks at length about mediating cases and reaching settlements. He discusses some controversial issues he's had to rule on, including drug use, the death penalty, and abortion. He also speaks briefly about his family life.

Leavy discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, beginning with his appointment by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. He discusses some of the cases he heard, including on Rajneeshpuram. He describes the various duties of federal judges; the processes and procedures of the Court of Appeals; and how it differs from the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his experience as a senior judge on the Court of Appeals since 1997, including mediating for U.S. v. Wen Ho Lee. He then talks about serving on the Surveillance Court of Review from 2001 to 2008, including the history and duties of that court. He also talks about writing opinions, his staff and law clerks, and the workload on the Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by discussing his thoughts on the trend of civil penalties in lieu of criminal, and concerns about the right to privacy.

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Oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer

This oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer was conducted by Clark Hansen at Frohnmayer's office in Medford, Oregon, as part of the United States District Court of Oregon Oral History Project. The interview was conducted in two sessions, on November 28, 1989, and December 1, 1989.

In the first interview session, Frohnmayer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including the reasons his family came to the United States, his education, and family vacations to Seaside. He also talks about anti-German sentiment in Portland, Oregon during World War I and how that affected him in his social and political views. He also talks about the fire that happened at Washington High School during his senior year. He discusses working in hotels and attending the University of Oregon, including his social life, studying law, and his experiences during the Depression. He talks about people and professors he met during law school, including Judge William East, and about his involvement with the Law Review.

In the second interview session, Frohnmayer shares his political and social philosophy, and how it was affected by the Depression and World War II. He discusses his early career as a lawyer in Medford, including cases he worked on, his fellow lawyers, and judges he argued before. He also talks about his involvement in several organizations, including the Rogue Valley Memorial Hospital and the Oregon State Bar; and about his involvement in politics, including leadership positions on campaign committees for Mark Hatfield and Wayne Morse. He describes the effects of World War II and the construction of Interstate 5 on Medford. He speaks at length about his work with probate law revision and how he came to focus on it. He discusses his marriage to MarAbel Fisher Braden, and talks about their children and their children's families and careers. He talks about members of the legal profession whom he worked with, and shares his opinion about the qualities that make for great lawyers and judges. He discusses the politics involved in judicial appointments; describes jury trials and appellate hearings; and talks about ethical problems that lawyers face. He also talks about how changes in the legal system have affected his practice and clientele. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

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Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

This oral history interview with Cecil Edwards was conducted by Irvin Luiten from May 18 to 26, 1988. In the interview, Edwards discusses his family history and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his education and early interest in government. He then talks about his experiences working for the Oregon Legislature beginning in 1933. He discusses the old Capitol building, which burned down in 1935; campaigns he worked on, and the role of lobbyists. He also talks about working as secretary for Governor Charles Sprague. Edwards then describes his service in the National Guard during World War II, particularly working with horses and dogs. He talks about returning to work in Oregon government after the war ended, including serving on the Racing Commission; being fired by Governor Mark Hatfield; lobbying for the Oregon Cattlemen's Association; and returning to the Legislature to work as a secretary. He discusses the numerous committees he was secretary for, including the agriculture committee, fish and game committee, and land-use board. Edwards next discusses his tenure as secretary of the Senate from 1965 to 1975, focusing on many of the legislators he worked with, including Clarence Barton, Debbs Potts, and Jason Boe. He also speaks at length about redistricting, as well as the duties of the secretary of the Senate and Senate rules.

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Construction of the Umpqua River jetty, Reedsport, Or. photograph album

Album 453 was created between 1933 and 1947 and contains photographs of the construction of the Umpqua River jetties in Reedsport, Oregon. The north jetty was constructed in 1919 and reconstructed in 1947. The south jetty was constructed in 1934 and 1935. Album 453 includes at least one aerial photograph by Brubaker Aerial Surveys and at least two photographs taken by John Stilanos.

Oral history interview with LeRoy Haynes, Jr.

This oral history interview with the Rev. Dr. LeRoy Haynes, Jr., was conducted by Jan Dilg at Haynes' office in Portland, Oregon, from October 8 to December 5, 2018. Haynes was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on October 8, 2018, Haynes discusses his family background and early life in Beaumont, Texas, including his experiences with racism and segregation as a black person. He talks about the black community in Beaumont, his early education, and his early involvement with the Methodist Episcopal Church. He discusses his involvement in the civil rights movement, including his training for and participation in non-violent protests. He then talks about his involvement in the Black Power Movement and the Black Consciousness Movement. He discusses his role in the development of the Black Panther Party; talks about the history of the struggle for freedom for black people; and discusses his experience in college while organizing for civil rights. He talks about his journey in becoming a Methodist Episcopal pastor and briefly discusses his experience at the Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 29, 2018, Haynes continues discussing his journey in becoming a Methodist Episcopal pastor and his experience at the Perkins School of Theology. He also talks about the history of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. He discusses his career as a pastor in Texas; talks about navigating the conservative attitudes in Dallas to accomplish his goals; and describes his accomplishments. He goes on to speak about his involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance in Portland, Oregon. He discusses his work, in both Oregon and Texas, for programs regarding AIDS and HIV, as well as addiction. He then briefly talks about serving as president of the North Portland Bible College. He discusses his love of education and talks about earning his doctorate of ministry from Brite Theological Seminary and doing post-doctoral work at the Boston University. He describes being recruited to serve as pastor of Allen Temple Christian Methodist Episcopal Church in Portland, and as presiding elder of the Alaska & Oregon/Washington Districts and in the Alaska-Pacific Region of the 9th Episcopal District. He shares his first impression of Portland and describes his congregation and the church building. He revisits the topic of his involvement in the Albina Ministerial Alliance and talks about his work toward police reform.

In the third interview session, conducted on December 5, 2018, Haynes discusses serving as president of the North Portland Bible College. He talks about his involvement with the Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon and his continued activism. He reflects on the challenges he faced as a civil rights activist, and how he applied the lessons he learned during that time to his community activism in Portland. He also talks about the different forms that racism takes, particularly describing the difference between his experiences in Texas and Oregon. He discusses his book, "God's Prophet in Non-Violence: The Theology and Philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.," and talks about what he hopes readers take from it. He closes the interview by talking about his work with the Allen Temple Christian Methodist Episcopal Church at the time of the interview, awards he's received, and his hopes for the future.

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Oral history interview with John Y. Murakami

This oral history interview with John Y. Murakami was conducted by George Katagiri from July 13-20, 1992, at Murakami's home in Portland, Oregon. The interview was recorded as part of the Japanese American Oral History Project, which was conducted by the Oregon Historical Society to preserve the stories of Japanese Americans in Oregon. This interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 13, 1992, Murakami discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Sherwood, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon. He talks about the grocery store that his father, Shuichi Sam Murakami, owned; his experience during the Depression; and his education. He discusses jobs he worked after dropping out of high school and talks about playing in the Nisei Baseball League.

In the second interview session, conducted on July 14, 1992, Murakami continues discussing his experiences in the Nisei Baseball League, as well as his interest in other sports. He also talks about his social life as a teenager. He speaks about a few instances of prejudice that he experienced. He discusses his experience in the U.S. Army, serving in the European Theater during World War II. He also talks about the U.S. government's incarceration of his family at the Minidoka War Relocation Center, and about his marriage to Sumi Matsushita. He then discusses his life in Portland after his discharge from the Army in 1945, including working in construction and teaching building construction at Benson Polytechnic High School.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on July 20, 1992, Murakami talks about his children, their education, their families, and their careers. He then talks about his retirement activities, particularly his involvement in Japanese American community organizations. He also revisits the topic of his Army experience during World War II. He shares his opinion about the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which granted redress to Japanese Americans whom the government incarcerated during the war. He closes the interview by reflecting upon his life and accomplishments.

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