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Loyal Order of Moose? parade in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a parade in Vancouver, Washington. At right is a band in costume, playing instruments. The people in the parade may be members of the Loyal Order of Moose. Also see image Nos. 371N4894, 371N4896, 371N4897, 371N4898, 371N4899, 371N4900, 371N4901, 371N4902, 371N4903, 371N4904, and 371N4925. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Loyal Order of Moose? parade in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a parade in Vancouver, Washington. The men in front are wearing matching southern-style cowboy clothing. The people in the parade may be members of the Loyal Order of Moose. Also see image Nos. 371N4891, 371N4894, 371N4897, 371N4898, 371N4900, 371N4901, 371N4902, 371N4904, and 371N4925. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Seattle, Washington

Transcription from back: “The building on the hill was the territorial university which has now home The University of Washington.” Transcription on front: “Seattle, Wash. 1862.”

Map, showing lines under construction and proposed routes and connections

A colored map of Oregon, Washington, and parts of Idaho produced by the Oregon Pacific Railroad Company circa 1885. The map shows railroad lines under construction and proposed routes and connections, steamship lines along rivers and other navigable waterways, built and projected connections, and boundaries of land grants held by the Oregon Pacific Railroad Company. Scale [ca. 1:1,800,000]. Relief shown by form lines. Original map mounted on cloth backing. Item has also been identified as bb0175546.

Oregon Pacific Railroad Company

Washington Operations

A map of Spruce Production Division operations in Washington. Transcription from slide: “Map No. 1, showing S. P. D. Railroads No. 1 1 & 2. Railroads No. 1 & 2 control timbered area covering 402 square miles, containing timber as follows: Spruce - 987,309,000, Cedar - 543,164,000, Fir - 2,393,502,000, Hemlock - 2,813,264,000. Map No. 2, Enlarged Scale Map Of Western Portion Of Map No. 1. Map No. 3, Showing S. P. D. Railroad No. 3. Railroad No. 3 controls timbered area covering 63 square miles, containing timber as follows: Spruce - 234,065,000, Cedar - 164,196,000, Fir - 341,933,000, Hemlock - 397,158,000. Map No. 4, Showing S. P. D. Railroad No. 4, Railroad No. 4 controls timbered area covering 46 square miles containing timber as follows: Spruce - 94,518,000, Cedar - 295,054,000, Fir - 4,115,000, Hemlock - 123,119,000. Map No. 5, Showing S. P. D. Railways No. 5, 6, & 7. Railroad No. 5 controls timbered area covering 48 square miles, containing timber as followss: Spruce - 95,570,000, Cedar - 79,712,000, Fir - 228,015,000, Hemlock - 138,980,000. Railroad No. 6 controls timbered area covering 6 square miles, containing timber as follows: Spruce - 30,447,000, Cedar - 27,897,000, Fir -, Hemlock - 26,875,000. Railroad No. 7, controls timbered area covering 38 square miles, containing timber as follows: Spruce - 85,537,000, Cedar - 74,551,000, Fir - 30,761,000, Hemlock - 105,208,000.”

United States. War Department. Spruce Production Division

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a Varney Air Lines mail plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. On December 1, 1929, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the crash, headlined “Mail Pilot Rams Span; Badly Hurt.” A similar photo, image No. 371N3109, was published on Page 2 that day. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the [Interstate] bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Captain John M. Stanley in plane after return to Pearson Field

Photograph of two aviators in a plane outside a hangar at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday, January 7, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, January 8, 1927, under the headline “Here’s Kelly — If Anyone Asks.” The photograph had the following caption: “After losing and finding themselves again while looking for Leslie Brownlee, lost on Mount Hood, Lieutenant Oakley Kelly and Captain John Stanley returned Friday to Vancouver barracks. They were greeted by Motorcycle Patrolmen Regan and Tauscher, who joined in the search for them. Kelly is shown in the front seat of the plane, Stanley behind.” According to an accompanying story, headlined “Kelly Tells of Harrowing Trip; Never Such Fog,” Stanley and Kelly had left on Wednesday, January 5, to conduct an aerial search of Mount Hood for Brownlee, but were caught in a storm and dense fog. They were forced to fly east and land in a field about five miles from Long Creek, in Grant County. According to the story, they spent the night in the field with the plane and walked to get help and fuel the next morning. On their return flight, they were delayed by another storm and spent the night of Thursday, January 6, in Pendleton before continuing to Vancouver on January 7. See related image No. 371N5908. Image note: The text “Kelly + Stanley” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Postmaster John M. Jones before departure for air-mail celebration

Photograph of two men, pilot Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly (left) and Portland Postmaster John M. Jones, seated in Kelly’s airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on April 6, 1926. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 8 of the Oregon Journal that day under the headline “Postmaster Also Goes by Air Mail.” The photograph had the following caption: “John M. Jones, head of Portland’s postoffice, as he appeared early today when he became a passenger with Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly, army flying ace at Vancouver barracks, to join air mail celebration at Pasco. Jones is in rear seat of plane piloted by Kelly.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the inauguration of air-mail service from the Pacific Northwest on a new route between Pasco, Washington, and Elko, Nevada. According to that story, headlined “Northwest’s First Mail Plane Is Off,” Jones and Kelly flew to Pasco on the morning of the first flight on the new route to participate in festivities marking the event. Image note: The text “Okley [sic] G Kelly and Postmaster Jones” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image. See related image No. 371N5910.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Postmaster John M. Jones before departure for air-mail celebration

Photograph of two men, pilot Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly (left) and Portland Postmaster John M. Jones, standing next to Kelly’s airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on April 6, 1926. A similar photograph of the two men, image No. 371N5909, was published on Page 8 of the Oregon Journal that day; it was part of the Journal’s coverage of the inauguration of air-mail service from the Pacific Northwest on a new route between Pasco, Washington, and Elko, Nevada. According to a front-page story, headlined “Northwest’s First Mail Plane Is Off,” Jones and Kelly flew to Pasco on April 6, the morning of the first flight on the new route, to participate in festivities marking the event.

Pilot John H. Miller with trophy and airplane at Pearson Field

Photograph of pilot John H. Miller posing next to an airplane and holding a trophy that depicts a woman riding an eagle and holding a small plane in one upraised hand. The photograph was taken at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Monday, September 26, 1927, after Miller arrived in an all-metal Hamilton monoplane, probably the plane in the photograph. A cropped version of this photograph was one of seven images published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, September 27, 1927. The photographs, published under the headline “To Cut Air Capers at Portland’s Big Show,” were part of coverage of an air show in Portland. This photograph had the following caption: “Miller is holding Detroit News Air Transport trophy won at Spokane meet.” According to an accompanying article, the trophy had been awarded to the Hamilton airplane “for efficiency in the weight to horsepower tests” at an air show in Spokane the previous week. See related image Nos. 371N0595, 371N5913, 371N6105, 371N6106, 371N6107, 371N6108, and 371N6126. Image note: The name “John H Miller” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Senti family dog in field after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti’s fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Senti family dog after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A similar photograph, image No. 371N3380, was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” The photograph of Trixie had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti's fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875. Image note: Photograph is out of focus.

Franklin D. Roosevelt holds child during campaign visit to Seattle

Photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt, then governor of New York, holding a young boy in Seattle, Washington, on September 20, 1932, while campaigning for president. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 20 of the Oregon Journal on September 21, 1932, as part of a full page of photographs from Roosevelt’s trip through Oregon and Washington. The photographs were published under the headline “Great Crowds Welcome Governor Roosevelt to the Pacific Northwest.” This photograph had the following caption: “Making friends with a little patient at the Orthopedic hospital in Seattle during his visit there Tuesday.” A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 20 of the Oregon Journal on September 21, 1932, as part of a full page of photographs from Roosevelt’s trip through Oregon and Washington. See related image Nos. 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2179, 371N2180, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2187, 371N2188, 371N2189, 371N2191, 371N2196, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

KATU news video

  • KATU
  • Collection
  • 1980-03-20 - 1980-06-20

News footage from the KATU Television station in Portland, Oregon.

KATU (Television station : Portland, Or.)

The Eruption of Mt. St. Helens, no. 14

Raw news footage of the eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Description provided by broadcaster: “Aerials of Mountain. Eerie steam cloud. Interview with geologist. He tells us about the situation in the volcano and what problems to expect. Tim Storrs and geologist discuss the mountain and how much of it is missing while camera runs on views of Mt. St. Helens.

Toutle River and Camp Baker. Aerials of Camp Baker and Toutle River valley. Long shots of valley and surrounding area. Pictures of hills, etc. Back to Camp Baker. Shots of logs, machinery, and mud. Debris everywhere. Toutle - mud- river. More Camp Baker. Helicopter lands. More mud and landscape surrounding river. Bridge washed out. Wide views, dusty hills.

Clear shot of mountain erupting. Side of mountain. Plume and wide shot. Valleys and ash clouds. Wide to close of mountain and ash.

Many views of mountain erupting.”

KATU (Television station : Portland, Or.)

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