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Oregon Journal Photographic Negatives Swan Island Industrial Park (Portland, Or.) With digital objects
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Three men, one in Santa suit, with airplane

Photograph of two unidentified men, one of them dressed as Santa Claus, standing on the wing of a plane at the Swan Island airport in Portland. A third unidentified man is standing on the ground next to the wing and is reaching up to shake hands with the man in the Santa suit.

Air race winners Charles W. “Speed” Holman and R. B. Knowles with Mayor George L. Baker

Photograph of (from left) R. B. Knowles, Portland Mayor George L. Baker, and pilot Charles W. “Speed” Holman standing in front of a biplane on Tuesday, September 27, 1927, probably at Swan Island airport in Portland. Holman won the Class A race in a Spokane-to-Portland air derby that day; Knowles was his passenger. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph, showing only Holman, was one of four photographs, including image Nos. 371N6108 and 371N6126, published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 28, 1927. The photographs were published under the headline “Adventurers of the Air Who Thrilled Portland Today.” This photograph had the following caption: “C. W. (Speed) Holman, who won the class A race yesterday from Spokane to Portland by a matter of seconds over E. E. Ballough.” The photographs accompanied a continuation of a front-page story about the air races. Also see related image Nos. 371N0595, 371N5913, 371N6106, 371N6107, and 371N6112. Image note: Handwritten on the negative is the text “Holman - Mayor - Knowles.” The writing is visible on the right side of the image.

Eddie Stinson and party with plane at air show in Portland

Photograph of pilot Eddie Stinson (right) standing in a row with three men and two women next to his Stinson Detroiter monoplane at Swan Island airport in Portland. The photograph was taken on Tuesday, September 27, 1927, after the group’s arrival for an air show at Swan Island. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four, including image Nos. 371N6105 and 371N6108, that were published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 28, 1927. The photographs were published under the headline “Adventurers of the Air Who Thrilled Portland Today.” This photograph had the following caption: “Members of the Eddie Stinson party as they arrived at the airport; from left, A. H. Harris, Fred Koehler, Mrs. Bert Acosta, wife of the famous flier; J. T. Whitaker, Mrs. Thomas Mulroy, wife of [Richard E.] Byrd’s chief engineer, and the famous Eddie himself.” The photographs accompanied a story about air races and other events related to the show. See related image Nos. 371N0595, 371N5913, 371N6106, 371N6107, and 371N6112. Image note: The text “Stinson 1” and “Acosta 4” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Pilots Frank M. Hawks, Dorothy Hester, and Tex Rankin at Swan Island airport, Portland

Photograph showing (from left) pilots Frank M. Hawks, Dorothy Hester, and Tex Rankin next to Hawks’ airplane at Swan Island airport in Portland. The photograph was taken on Saturday, November 28, 1931, after Hawks flew from San Francisco for a brief stay in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal’s city edition on Sunday, November 29, 1931. The photographs were published under the headline “Three Hours From San Francisco.” They had the caption: “Captain Frank M. Hawks said his exact time from San Francisco to Portland Saturday was three hours and five minutes. But at that, he wasn’t trying for speed—just jogging along.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Three famous fliers get together (from left), Hawks, Dorothy Hester, and Tex Rankin.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about Hawks. Also see image Nos. 374N0276 and 374N0299, which were published with this photograph, and image No. 374N0300.

USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland, in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. A crowd is partially visible in the foreground. This photograph may have been taken on Friday, August 18, 1933, when a large crowd of spectators watched sailors set the sails on the frigate’s mizzenmast. See image No. 371N3712.

Crowd watching crew members set sails on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing a crowd of spectators watching crew members set sails on the mizzenmast of the USS Constitution on Friday, August 18, 1933. The ship was moored on Swan Island, Portland, during a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, August 19, 1933, under the headline “Constitution Preens Wings.” This photograph had the following caption: “While thousands of Portlanders looked on from the airport and the hill sides, sailors on ‘Old Ironsides’ set sails on the mizzenmast of the old warrior late Friday. Top picture shows the sails unfurled.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley shaking hands as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken on August 11, 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return, headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Ironsides” was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. See related image Nos. 371N3713 and 371N3719. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Presentation of Oregon state flag to crew of USS Constitution?

Photograph showing two unidentified women and four U. S. Navy officers standing in a row on a ship, holding a flag depicting a beaver. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, at a reception aboard the frigate USS Constitution after the ship arrived in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. In a front-page story on August 3, 1933, the Oregon Journal reported the following about the ceremony: “The outstanding feature of the reception was presentation of the official flag of Oregon to Commander [Henry] Hartley and the ship by the Daughters of 1812. Mrs. George H. Root, president, made the speech of presentation telling how glad the people of Portland were to have the privilege of visiting the great naval shrine and welcoming the officers and men. Miss Esther Allen Jobes, granddaughter of the founding president of the organization, presented the flag to the commander.” Also see image No. 371N0473.

George O. Noville, F. V. Tompkins, and R. S. Allen at air circus on Swan Island, Portland

Portrait of three men standing next to an airplane, possibly a tri-motor Ford-Stout owned by the Standard Oil Company, at Swan Island airport. The plane arrived in Portland on Saturday, June 9, 1928, and was on display at the airport on Sunday, June 10, 1928, during Portland’s second annual air circus. A cropped version of this photograph, along with a picture of the Ford-Stout plane, was published in the Oregon Journal on June 10, 1928, under the headline “Huge Avion Greeted With Acclaim.” This photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Commander George Noville, who flew across pole and over Atlantic with [Richard E.] Byrd; F. V. Tompkins, pilot of the giant aircraft, and R. S. Allen, assistant pilot.” In a front-page story that day, the Journal reported that Noville had arrived in Portland on the Ford-Stout plane. See related image Nos. 371N1902, 371N2520, 371N5952. Image note: Double exposure. The text “Novill [sic] — Tompkins ?” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Spectators at air circus, Swan Island, Portland

Photograph of a crowd outdoors behind a cordon. The photograph was probably taken on Sunday, June 10, 1928, at Swan Island airport during Portland’s second annual air circus. Behind the crowd is an airplane with the words “Standard of California” on the side. The plane, a tri-motor Ford-Stout owned by the Standard Oil Company, was on exhibit at Swan Island during the air show, according to a story about the event on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on June 11, 1928. The Journal reported that more than 6,000 people attended the air show, which included stunts, races, parachuting, and a double wedding on a plane. See related image Nos. 371N1902, 371N2516, and 371N2520. Image note: The number 9 is written on the negative and is faintly visible in the lower right corner of the image.

Anthony Mackiewicz, Charles Dickinson, and E. E. Ballough in front of airplane

Photograph of (from left) Anthony Mackiewicz, Charles Dickinson, and pilot E. E. Ballough standing in a row in front of a biplane, probably at Swan Island airport in Portland. This photograph was taken on September 27, 1927, after Ballough took second place in the Class A race of a Spokane-to-Portland air derby. Dickinson was the passenger on the flight and Mackiewicz was the mechanic. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph, showing only Ballough and Dickinson, was one of four photographs, including image Nos. 371N6105 and 371N6126, published on Page 21 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 28, 1927. The photographs were published under the headline “Adventurers of the Air Who Thrilled Portland Today.” This photograph identified the two men as E. E. Ballough and “Charles Dickinson of Chicago, ‘Santa Claus of the air mail.’ “ The photographs accompanied a continuation of a front-page story about the air races. Also see image Nos. 371N0595, 371N5913, 371N6106, 371N6107, and 371N6112. Image note: The text “Ballough - Dickinson” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Pilots Frank M. Hawks and Tex Rankin shaking hands at Swan Island airport, Portland

Photograph showing pilot Frank M. Hawks smiling as he shakes hands with pilot Tex Rankin at Swan Island airport in Portland on Saturday, November 28, 1931. In the background is Hawks’ plane. The photograph was taken after Hawks arrived from San Francisco for a brief stay in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal’s city edition on Sunday, November 29, 1931. The photographs were published under the headline “Three Hours From San Francisco.” They had the caption: “Captain Frank M. Hawks said his exact time from San Francisco to Portland Saturday was three hours and five minutes. But at that, he wasn’t trying for speed—just jogging along.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Hawks and his big smile.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about Hawks. Also see image Nos. 374N0276 and 374N0278, which were published with this photograph, and image No. 374N0300.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver waving farewell from USS Constitution

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, waving from the top of the gangplank before the ship’s departure from Portland on August 22, 1933, after a three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, a cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3705 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver of the frigate waves farewell to an appreciative and grateful city.” Image note: Light leak on negative.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (second from left), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (right) and unidentified sailors saluting as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after returning from a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken aboard the Constitution on August 11, 1933, while the ship and crew were in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3713 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, left, stepping onto the decks of ‘Old Ironsides,’ with side-boys at salute, and welcomed by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Hartley, who had command of the frigate during Gulliver’s absence on leave. Hartley relinquished command and resumed his duties as executive officer.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Old Ironsides.” The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the honors marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of USS Constitution

Half-length portrait of Commander Louis J. Gulliver facing front. The photograph was taken in Portland in May 1933, when Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, inspected the moorage at Swan Island prior to a visit by the frigate and crew in August as part of a national tour. With Gulliver were Lieutenant. H. St Johns Butler (background, left), the ship’s navigating officer, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer. A story, headlined “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Chief Praises Moorage Here,” and related image No. 371N3715 were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on May 12, 1933.

Descendants of Revolutionary War captain William Van Cleve aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Full-length portrait showing six descendants of William Van Cleve posing aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in August 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and a short story were published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on August 10, 1933, under the headline “Ship Visit Unites Family.” The photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Joseph Collins Van Cleve of U. S. S. Constitution brings definite proof to Circuit Judge Clarence H. Gilbert and Dr. Archie Van Cleve of Portland that they are descendants of William Van Cleve, a captain in the Revolutionary war. From left, aboard Old Ironsides, are Judge Gilbert, Dr. Van Cleve, Bertelle Van Cleve, 5; Katherine Gilbert, 20; Joanne Van Cleve, 12; Lieutenant Van Cleve.” According to the accompanying story, Bertelle and Joanne Van Cleve are the daughters of Archie Van Cleve, and Katharine Gilbert (spelled differently in the caption than in the story) is the daughter of Judge Gilbert.

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