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William L. Finley Papers, 1899-1946
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Canada goose or honker

Manuscript that comments on the migration of Canadian geese. Author states that spotting geese is the most notable sign that autumn is approaching.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The pitcher plant traps and eats insects

A group of people, two who were residents of Gold Beach, went in search of deer. The group included Edgar Averill, John Yeon, Mr. and Mrs. Miller, along with the author. While the group did not find any deer in that outing, they did find a carnivorous plant and took a specimen home. The author goes on to describes how the plant gets nourishment and how it received its scientific name.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The joke was on the kingfisher

Manuscript about how Jack Horn of the United States Forestry Service protected his goldfish from a Kingfisher. Horn's first batch of fish had been hunted successfully by the bird. Horn learned his lesson and thwarted the bird's future attempts by adding wire netting.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Belted kingfisher

Manuscript that discusses the Kingfisher, including how the species has a preference towards solitude, habitat choice, and diet.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The gentle wood-pussy

Manuscript describing a skunk and insisting that they receive undue negativity. The author insists the animals are friendly and are not looking for trouble. The author also comments on the two types of skunks most commonly found in Oregon.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Squaw or bear grass

Short manuscript that goes into detail about bear grass, specifically the different names it is known by as well as its uses.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The American coot as a game bird

Manuscript that wonders if the American coot, also known as a mud hen, would become a game bird. Coots were considered nuisances because they took away food sources from ducks. According to the document, ducks used coots as buffers in order to better protect themselves from hunters.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Water ouzel or American dipper

Manuscript depicting a pair of water ouzels. Jack Horn from the United States Forest Service watched as one bird threw nest materials into the water, similar to how loggers toss in logs, making the transportation of materials easier. The author of the document goes on to say few people are familiar with the song of the ouzel. The author also gives the reader details about the bird's appearance and that another pair could be spotted at Multnomah Falls.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Dispersal of seeds

Manuscript explaining how seeds travel and spread. The document includes an interaction with a squirrel.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Malheur refuge an aid to both birds and farmers

Manuscript that details the advantages of a wildlife refuge, especially in regards to the land. The document describes some of the difficulties that the Malheur Refuge experienced. Examples include illegal squatters around the lake bed and the attempt of a pair of locals (Culver Marshall and Wilbur Springer) to host a duck hunt inside the refuge.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Turkeys check grasshopper pests

Manuscript recounting when County Agent Henderson came up with the idea of using turkeys as a solution to the overpopulation of grasshoppers in the county. The insects were destroying vegetation at an alarming rate. Then when the turkeys are no longer needed, they are sold off as poultry.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Federal courts uphold migratory bird regulations

Manuscript recalling when hunters and sportsmen attempted to prove that migratory regulations signed by President Roosevelt were unconstitutional. Two cases are mentioned, one from Kentucky involving Judge Ford, the second in Illinois with Judge Major. Both upheld the regulations.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Owl of the Arctic

Manuscript about the Arctic owl, focusing on the bird's appearance, hunting habits, and its habitat.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Golden eagle nearly wrecks car

Manuscript recalling a collision of Mr. Echidnas and an eagle. Fortunately the bird survived and was put into the care of Dr. L. E. Hibbard. The author goes on to point out that this eagle is protected by law but sadly has been exterminated in several parts of the Pacific Northwest.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Game record keeping for deer

Manuscript in which the Supervisor of the Ochoco Forest, Lester Moncrief, and storekeeper at Paulina, Lyle Miller, report the numbers of deer hunted. After considering the large number of bucks killed, rangers of the area asserted that the deer population was increasing. The author claims that the increase in population was direct proof that protection of the animals has been key to that success.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Klamath waterfowl mat stage a good comeback

Manuscript that relays the struggle of farmers and land owners versus the Reclamation Services in respects to the lake beds in the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake areas. It was recognized that the drying of the beds is destructive to the local waterfowl because of a lack of a reliable water source. For the farmers and land owners, they would rather see the land as a place of cultivation. The Reclamation Service believed that only a small part could realistically be kept under cultivation. Part of the area in question became a sump and instead of using all of the land for that purpose, a refuge area was set aside which became the Tule Lake Refuge.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Uncle Sam takes life insurance for his family

Manuscript discusses the importance of forests and the reality that upkeep is costly and time consuming. Author advocates that the American government should finance this and praises the work being done by the Forest Service. The program took unemployed young men from metropolitan areas and placed them into service for the forests. Not only was this beneficial for the forests, but the author contends that the young men free of the bad influences of the city, made the government's investment sound.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Nothing a duck hunter likes better than ducks

Manuscript in which the author writes as if they are a disgruntled duck hunter. The character goes on to complain about how the laws from the federal and state governments have prevented hunters from being able to hunt as much as they please. The character goes on to lament about how the best shooting was during the winter because it was easier. The character longs for the good old days.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Californian interest in Oregon

Manuscript discussing the interest Californians were taking in Southern Oregon for recreation, especially in respects to angling in the Rogue, Umpqua, and Wilson rivers. The author points out that these are smaller streams and for the fishermen who depend on the rivers for their livelihood could be greatly affected by Californians' recreational fishing.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Restoring Oregon forests

Manuscript describing an article written by Cory Ford and Alastair MacBain. The main focus of this document is restoring our forests in order to provide the necessary habitats for the fish and wildlife. The practice of raising animals in hatcheries and releasing them back in to the wild for sport is pointless when the environment is polluted and kills the animals.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

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