Print preview Close

Showing 2582 results

Collections
Text
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

2582 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Oral history interview with Irvin Luiten [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with Irvin "Irv" Herman Luiten was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from March 16, 1988, to January 19, 1990, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Luiten discusses his family background and early life on wheat farms in Ritzville and Edwall, Washington, including his early education and the struggles his family faced during the Great Depression. He then describes studying journalism at Washington State University in the late 1930s, including the evolution of his political views and his interest in radio broadcasting. He discusses his early career as a journalist for the Colville Examiner from 1940 to 1941 and for the Northwest Farm News in 1941. Luiten also talks extensively about his service during World War II, including acting as defense counsel for his battalion and about soldier morale. He talks about his work with the Military Intelligence Service to teach escape and evasion tactics to airmen and setting up lines of escape in France. Next, he describes his post-war life, including taking the editorship of the Northwest Farm News; marrying Ellen Boyde and raising a family; taking a job at Washington State University; and beginning his career with the Weyerhaeuser Company, doing public relations work as a writer for Weyerhaeuser News. He talks about aspects of Weyerhaeuser that made him loyal to the company, including the company's forest management practices and the management style of Phil Weyerhaeuser. Luiten also describes his experiences as a lobbyist for Weyerhaeuser from 1953 to 1978. He talks about the primary issues Weyerhauser was concerned with, including taxes, particularly timber taxes; pollution; land use; environmental law; and labor laws. Luiten also discusses his involvement with the Izaak Walton League of America and his conservation work; the Clemons Tree Farm; the workplace culture at Weyerhaeuser; and the company's relationship with the public. He goes on to talk about working with lobbyists for other Oregon timber interests, the different timber harvesting philosophies between Weyerhaeuser and Georgia-Pacific, and how those philosophies affected the economy of the state. He speaks at length on the importance of public relations work. He also discusses working with legislators such as Mark Hatfield, Dick Neuberger, Clarence Barton, Dick Eymann, and Vic Atiyeh. He closes the interview by talking about his life in retirement.

Luiten, Irvin H. (Irvin Herman), 1915-1997

Letter from Delazon Smith to Mary Shepherd Smith

Letter written by Delazon Smith to his wife, Mary Shepherd Smith on February 14, 1859. The letter announces the admission of Oregon as a state in the Union. It also includes an account of Smith drawing lots with Joseph Lane for the length of their senatorial terms.

Smith, Delazon

Susan B. Anthony letter to "My Dear Friends"

Letter from Susan B. Anthony to "My Dear Friends" dated 21 May 1885, regarding her recent visit, transmitting the first two volumes of the history of woman suffrage and encouraging the recipients to report their activities to "New Era." The letter is written on letterhead for the National Woman Suffrage Association.

Anthony, Susan B. (Susan Brownell), 1820-1906

Official Ballot for Precinct No. 1, Multnomah County, Oregon, November 5, 1912

Official Ballot for Precinct No. 1, Multnomah County, Oregon, November 5, 1912. The ballot includes candidates for national, state, and local offices as well as a number of state and local ballot initiatives. Most notable among them, an initiative petition for an equal suffrage amendment to extend the right of suffrage in the state of Oregon to Women.

Oregon. Elections Division

Abigail Scott Duniway Lecture Notes

Notes from a speech given by Abigail Scott Duniway, likely in early 1913. In the speech, Duniway reflects on her experiences as a Pioneer to Oregon and on the successful passage of an equal suffrage initiative for the state of Oregon during the November 12, 1912 election.

Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915

Letter from Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

A letter addressed to “Dear Friend,” from members of the Oregon Equal Suffrage Association asking voters to vote yes on the equal suffrage amendment in the 1906 Oregon elections. The letter is signed by Abigail Scott Duniway, Mrs. Henry Waldo Coe, Charlotte M. Cartwright, Sarah A. Evans, and Esther C. Pohl.

Oregon Equal Suffrage Association

Abigail Scott Duniway Lecture Notes

Notes from a lecture given by Abigail Scott Duniway in which she reflects on Sacajawea, early white settlement in Oregon, and the importance of equal suffrage for women. The notes are written on the letterhead for the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association.

Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915

Letter from Abigail Scott Duniway to the editor of the O. A. C. Barometer

A letter from Abigail Scott Duniway to the editor of the Oregon Agricultural College (O.A.C.) Barometer requesting that they run an appeal to voters in their paper in advance of the 1908 election to vote on an equal suffrage amendment for the state of Oregon. The letter is written on the letterhead for the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association.

Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915

True Temperance

A pamphlet entitled “True Temperance, by The Nestor of the Woman Suffrage Movement Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway.” It was distributed by the United States Brewers' Association describing Duniway’s position against prohibition and in favor of true temperance, or self-restraint, over anti-alcohol legislation.

Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915

Centennial Ode

A printed copy of the poem, “Centennial Ode,” written by Abigail Scott Duniway in commemoration of the Lewis and Clark Exposition in 1905.

Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins, by Jim Strassmaier [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins’ office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father’s career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice law suits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with Monroe Mark Sweetland was conducted by Richard Harmon from November 16, 1984, to October 26, 1987 at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In this interview, Sweetland discusses his family background and early life, including his childhood in rural Michigan; his early involvement in Democratic politics; and his experiences at Wittenberg University and Cornell University. He discusses his political activism during college, including his involvement with the Student League for Industrial Democracy and his political activism on behalf of Socialist candidates. Sweetland also discusses his political activities after his return to Oregon in 1935, including his work with the Oregon Commonwealth Federation and his decision to leave the Socialist Party and join the Democratic Party. Also discussed is his work with labor unions; the New Deal programs; and his work with the Oregon Democratic Party. He briefly talks about World War II and its effect on Oregon politics, particularly the effect the Hitler-Stalin pact had on American communists and the Oregon Commonwealth Federation; Japanese internment; and his own pacifism. Sweetland goes on to talk about his involvement with the Democratic Party of Oregon after the war as national committeeman; the factions within the party; and mobilizing women and black voters. He also discusses his ownership of several Oregon newspapers, the Molalla Pioneer, the Newport News, and the Milwaukie Review; and running them with the help of his wife, Lillie Sweetland. In addition, he describes his experiences as a legislator in the Oregon House of Representatives and Senate during the 1950s and early 1960s. Topics include: education; attempts to pass a sales tax; campaign finance; and Wayne Morse�â�€�™s switch to the Democratic Party. He also discusses working closely with Howard Morgan, the national chairman of the Democratic Party; U.S. Senator Dick Neuberger; and U.S. Representative Edith Green. Sweetland talks about his relationship with Mark Hatfield and running for secretary of state against him in 1956; the 1962 presidential election and his support of John F. Kennedy; and his campaign for secretary of state in 1964. Finally, he discusses his activities after leaving the legislature, including his interest in Indonesia and continued advocacy for education as a lobbyist for the National Education Association.

Sweetland, Monroe, 1910-2006

Oral history interview with Connie McCready [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with Connie McCready was conducted by Clark Hansen at McCready’s home in Portland, Oregon, from March 21 to July 5, 1994. In this interview, McCready discusses her family background and early life in Portland. She also discusses her early career in journalism working for the Coos Bay Times and the Oregonian; and starting a family with her husband, Oregonian reporter Albert L. McCready. She discusses her involvement with the Republican Party, campaigning, her liberal politics, and her experience as a woman in the Oregon Legislature during the 1967 and 1969 sessions. McCready also discusses legislation she worked on, including taxes, fair employment, public transportation and TriMet, and her work on behalf of sternwheelers. McCready talks about some of the legislators she worked with, including Tom Mahoney, Bob Packwood, Stafford Hansell, and Jason Boe. She then discusses her time in the Portland City Council from 1970 to 1979, including the Mount Hood Freeway vote; the bureaus she ran, including fire, cable, and public works; her support for gay rights; and receiving death threats. She discusses the city commissioners and mayors she worked with, including Frank Ivancie, Neil Goldschmidt, Terry Schrunk, and Mildred Schwab. She also discusses her campaign against John Lorenz in 1976, and Portland's sister-city relationship with Sapporo, Japan.

McCready, Connie (Constance), 1921-2000

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman [Transcript]

Transcript. This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman’s office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Results 2129 to 2156 of 2582