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Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway photographs

  • Org. Lot 78
  • Collection
  • 1890 - 1979

Photographs taken for the Burlington Northern Railroad and the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway. Subjects include railroad stations and yards; railroad tracks; trains; train wrecks; railroad bridge construction and maintenance; and railroad personnel, throughout Oregon and Washington. There are also photographs of various towns and landscapes Oregon, Washington, and California, through which the railroads passed, including images of the construction of the Bonneville Dam, the Columbia River and Columbia River Gorge, Mount Hood, and other mountains and lakes. The collection additionally contains photographs of people engaged in various recreations, including hiking, as well as a number of photographs relating to agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. There is also one photograph album containing interior and exterior photographs of the Reserved Seat Coach-Cafe Car of the Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway in 1939. Photographers include Photo-Art Comercial Studios and Arthur M. Prentiss of Portland, Or., among many others.

Photo Art Commercial Studio photographs

  • Org. Lot 791 - 1944
  • Collection
  • 1944

The Photo Art Commercial Studio Collection represents the work of one of Portland’s premiere commercial photography firms. The collection consists of hundreds of thousands of negatives, plus prints, slides, and film footage, from 1936 to 1998. This exceptional collection is rich in Northwest scenic views, portraits, photographs of community events and organizations, and business products and operations. Prominent Northwest photographers, such as Ray Atkeson, photographed for the studio.

Photo Art Studios was opened in 1925 by Claude F. Palmer who had operated a small photo studio as a teenager. Photo Art began as a photofinishing operation, expanding in later years to commercial and advertising photography, motion pictures, and photo murals. In 1959, John Patterson, an Oregonian who was studying photography, joined the staff of Photo Art. In 1965, Patterson became a partner in the business with Claude Palmer; Patterson assumed full ownership in 1978 after Palmer’s retirement.

Palmer, Claude F., 1899-1991

Flowers family photographs

  • Org. Lot 865
  • Collection
  • 1860-1955

Collection consists of 27 original photographs and copy prints relating to the Flowers family of Portland, Oregon. The photographs date from approximately 1860 to 1955. They are primarily portraits and snapshots of members of the Flowers family, including Allen Ervin Flowers; his wife, Louisa Mathilda Flowers; and their sons, Lloyd A. Flowers, Ralph Perpeno Flowers, Elmer Allen Flowers, and Ervin Milton Flowers. Also included are photographs from several Flowers family business enterprises, including the Flowers family farm, the Flowers automotive repair and sales lot, a jitney bus operated by Ralph Flowers, and beach cottages at Oceanlake, Oregon.

Charles Oluf Olsen photographs

  • Org. Lot 919
  • Collection
  • 1924-1931

Collection consists of 34 photographs of scenes in Portland, Oregon, and of Vancouver and Longview, Washington, taken or collected by Charles Oluf Olsen between 1924 and 1931. Olsen used many of the photographs in this collection to illustrate features he wrote for the Oregonian, Oregon Journal, and other publications. Subjects depicted in the collection include: photographs of an encampment of unhoused people under the north end of the Interstate Bridge in Vancouver, Washington, circa 1930; Lone Fir cemetery in Portland, Oregon, circa 1927; the William Sargent Ladd residence; the 1930 Longview, Washington, Rolleo log rolling competition; and Burnside street, circa 1924, showing the Volunteers of America Mission, Oregon Labor Industry offices, Ericson’s Saloon, and the House of All Nations Saloon.

Carleton E. Watkins photographs, 1861-1885

  • Org. Lot 93
  • Collection
  • 1861 - 1885

This collection contains stereographs, cartes de visite, cabinet and boudoir cards, photograph albums, mammoth plates, and other loose prints taken by landscape photographer Carleton E. Watkins, 1861-1885. Watkins photographs that were taken before he lost his Yosemite Art Gallery studio in 1876 to Isaiah W. Taber are known as his "Old Series." Watkins photographs taken after 1876 are referred to as his "New Series." The collection contains both Old Series and New Series images and includes some of Watkins' photographs printed under Taber's imprint..

The bulk of the stereographs and mammoth plate photographs in this collection were taken during Watkins' trips to Oregon to photograph Portland, the Willamette River, and the Columbia River in 1867 (Old Series), as well as in 1882, 1883, and the winter of 1884-1885 (New Series). There are also some stereographs that were taken by Watkins on his 1882 voyage to photograph Puget Sound in the Washington Territory and Victoria in British Columbia. Other mammoth plates, cartes de visite, and stereographs depict views of places in California, including Yosemite and Mariposa County, the Farallon Islands and other scenes of the California coast, San Francisco, Round Top, Mount Lola, and Mount Shasta, as well as views of Utah taken for the Union Pacific Railroad. There are also cabinet card portraits taken by Watkins of various people, including Oregon railroad financier Simeon Gannett Reed and members of the family of Cornelius C. Beekman (1828-1915), banker from Jacksonville, Or.

The collection also contains two photograph albums assembled by Watkins and originally owned by Charles H. Prescott (b. 1839), manager of the Oregon Railroad and Navigation Co. from 1881-1887. One album, "Sun Sketches of Columbia River Scenery," contains images taken by Watkins during his trips to the Columbia River Gorge circa 1882-1883, and the second album, ""Great Storm of the Winter of 1884-5. Columbia River, Or.," contains images that he took during a winter blizzard in December and January of 1884-1885 that snowed in an Oregon Railway and Navigation Co. train on its tracks along the Columbia River. The collection also contains one group of stereographs entitled "Watkins' Pacific Railroad" that were originally taken by Alfred A. Hart, official photographer for the Central Pacific Railroad, between 1862-1869 and reprinted by Watkins under his own imprint after 1870.

Watkins, Carleton E., 1829-1916

Tabor family photographs

  • Org. Lot 968
  • Collection
  • 1885 - 1895

Collection consists of photographs collected by the Tabor family. Most of the photographs are believed to have been taken or acquired by J. W. Tabor and Margaret Tabor during a trip to Portland, Oregon in 1895. Subjects include various views of Portland, including City Park (now Washington Park) gardens and bear pit, Mount Tabor reservoir, the Portland Heights cable car line, the Willamette River waterfront, and the Morrison Bridge; Celilo Falls; photographs of James Waucop Tabor, Margaret S. McNulty Tabor and her cousin, Alice Bachman Bettner; and a coroner's investigation of a body found in a mining camp near Granite, Oregon. None of the photographers are identified.

Rural Telephone Operators Oral History Series

  • Rural Telephone Operators Oral History Series
  • Collection

A series of oral history interviews and an essay by Anne Cummins. She interviewed individuals who worked as telephone operators in rural areas in the early part of the 20th century.

Oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon

  • SR 1
  • Collection
  • 1983-03-16

This oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon was conducted by Elizabeth Buehler at the Harmon home in Beavercreek, Oregon, on March 16, 1983. In this interview, the Harmons discuss their experience of graduating from Iowa State College, now Iowa State University, in the midst of the Depression with no job prospects in Iowa. Wendell H. Harmon describes choosing to leave Iowa for a homestead near Elk City, Oregon, in 1933. He talks about farming the land on the homestead, and Florence E. Harmon talks about their neighbors. She also talks about her experience being fired from her teaching job as a result of her marriage to Wendell H. Harmon. They discuss their experience setting up their homestead, including building and furnishing a house, preparing the land, and raising livestock. They talk about maintaining the homestead after Wendell H. Harmon accepted a forestry job in 1935 that involved work primarily outside Oregon, and about the process of acquiring the deed to the land. They close the interview by discussing tree farming, as well as the sale of their homestead.

Harmon, Wendell H. (Wendell Harold), 1910-1999

Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

  • SR 1002
  • Collection
  • 1991-07-16 - 1992-04-29

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from July 16, 1991, to April 29, 1992. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 16, 1991, Frank discusses his family background and how it intertwines with the history of the Meier & Frank Company. He talks about the company's founding in 1857 by his great-grandfather, Aaron Meier, and the growth of the store during the 19th century, including the store's Friday Surprise marketing strategy and the buildings the store inhabited. He then talks about the history of Meier & Frank during the early 20th century, including his uncle Julius Meier's term as Oregon governor from 1931 to 1935, competition with other department stores in Portland, and Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He also talks about the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 6, 1991, Frank continues discussing the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank, including his management of the Meier & Frank Department Store beginning in 1937. He also continues discussing Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He talks about the use of credit lines in the department store, particularly during the Depression. He discusses the Meier & Frank board of directors, and begins talking about the expansion of the store into Salem.

In the third interview session, conducted on December 21, 1991, Frank continues discussing the expansion of the Meier & Frank Department Store into Salem. He talks about managing the Salem branch from 1955 to 1965, including tailoring merchandise to the Salem community, his involvement in Salem community organizations, and his relationship with his employees. He also talks about the store's seasonal events and his relationship with other Meier & Frank store managers.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 29, 1992, Frank discusses the conditions that led to the sale of the Meier & Frank Department Store to the May Company in 1965. He describes the family divisions surrounding the sale. He then talks about resigning as manager of the Salem branch and the effect of the sale on the store's personnel and customer base. He closes the interview by talking about his relationship with the management of the Meier & Frank Department Store at the time of the interview in 1992.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with Elise F. Wendel

  • SR 1004
  • Collection
  • 1985-01-30 - 1985-02-27

This oral history interview with Elise F. Wendel was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, from January 30 to February 27, 1985. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 30, 1985, Wendel discusses her family background and early life in Southwest Portland, in the area that later became the Park Blocks. She talks about the people in her neighborhood and how the neighborhood changed during the time she lived there. She describes her childhood home at length. She talks about her experience growing up as a Jewish person in Portland, her recreational activities, and a family trip to Europe just before the outbreak of World War I. She also briefly shares her memories of civilian life during World War I and of the 1918 flu epidemic. She discusses her education, including attending Catlin Gabel School and studying in Paris, France.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 6, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her education, including attending Catlin Gabel School and studying in Paris, France, and attending a finishing school in New York. She talks about her father, I.N. Fleischner, and his department store, Fleischner, Mayer & Co. She then talks about her experiences at Wellesley College. She speaks about her marriage to Harold Fox Wendel and talks about his early life.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 13, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her marriage to Harold F. Wendel and his early life. She talks about Harold F. Wendel's career as president of the Lipman & Wolfe department store, including competition with Meier & Frank, changes he made to the business, and his management of his employees. She compares the managerial styles of I.N. Fleischner and Harold F. Wendel; talks about how the Depression affected Lipman & Wolfe; and discusses Harold F. Wendel's involvement with the Oregon State Sanitary Authority and other civic organizations.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 20, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her marriage to Harold F. Wendel, including the house they lived in and raising a family. She talks about her involvement with the Council of Jewish Women, the Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood, and the League of Women Voters. She also briefly discusses her involvement in civil defense activities during World War II. She speaks at length about her involvement with the Girl Scouts, including securing property for a summer camp.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on February 27, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her involvement with the Girl Scouts, discusses some of the events she helped organize for the group, and talks about some of the ways the organization has changed. She closes the interview by discussing her other volunteer activities.

Wendel, Elise F. (Elise Fleischner), 1905-1986

Oral history interview with Joel Redon

  • SR 1027
  • Collection
  • 1992-11-01 - 1994-02-18

This oral history interview with Joel Redon was conducted by Rick Harmon at Harmon's home and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from November 1, 1992, to February 18, 1994. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 1, 1992, Redon discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education and early interest in writing. He speaks about his sexual identity as a gay man and describes how he came to accept that label. He talks about running away from home and dropping out of high school at age 16, relocating to Seattle, Washington, and earning his GED. He talks about working as an interviewer for the Willamette Week newspaper in Portland and discusses some of the people he interviewed. He also briefly speaks about coming out and about changing his name from Bruce Randolph Didzun to Joel Redon in 1980. He speaks at length about his relationships with Paul Bowles, Allan Ginsburg, and Tennessee Williams. He talks about returning to Oregon and his relationship with a man he identifies as Jeffrey, and he describes the Portland gay social scene in the 1980s. He speaks about the end of the gay lifestyle in Portland at the end of the 1980s and the causes of its destruction; talks about the evolution of gay rights advocacy groups; and talks about the effect of AIDS on the gay community. He speaks at length about living with his own AIDS diagnosis, as well as his opposition to AZT (azidothymidine) treatments. He also discusses writing his semi-autobiographical novel "Bloodstream" and talks about the differences between himself and the novel's protagonist, Peter, and discusses writing his other novels.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 18, 1994, Redon discusses the book "A Voice Through a Cloud," by Denton Welch. He speaks about the AIDS epidemic and its toll on the gay community. He talks about the novel he was working on at the time of the interview in 1994 and describes some of the people he was writing about. He discusses events between the time of the first interview session in 1992 and this session in 1994, particularly regarding his unpublished writing and his mental and physical health. He then talks about his experiences and the writing process for "The Road to Zena" and "If Not on Earth, Then in Heaven." He discusses other authors living with AIDS and some of their works; reflects on his feelings and experiences upon being diagnosed with AIDS in 1986; and describes his current support system. He speaks at length about living with AIDS. He closes the interview by talking about seeing a therapist, about his plans to donate his papers to the Oregon Historical Society after his death, and about his unpublished journal.

Redon, Joel

Oral history interview with Raymond W. Nyls

  • SR 1031
  • Collection
  • 1992-04-04 - 1992-09-12

This oral history interview with Raymond W. Nyls was conducted by Kathleen A. Mitchell in Salem, Philomath, and Portland, Oregon, from April 4 to September 12, 1992. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted in Salem, Oregon, on April 4, 1992, Nyls discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Wauna, Warrenton, and Astoria, including learning to swim, the divorce of his parents, and his memories of the amusement park at Jantzen Beach. He also talks about family trips by train. He speaks at length about his childhood recreational activities, games, and hobbies. He also talks about his relationship with his step-father. He discusses his interest in military history and geology.

In the second interview session, conducted at the Benton County Historical Museum in Philomath, Oregon, on April 25, 1992, Nyls continues discussing his early life in Portland and Wauna, including his memories of the amusement park at Jantzen Beach, his social life during his teenage years, and his relationship with his step-father. He speaks about his step-father's work as a sawyer at sawmills in the company town of Wauna, describes the town, and discusses his education. He describes the houses he lived in, speaks about his recreational activities and childhood games, and discusses the Japanese American population in Wauna. He then looks at photographs of Wauna and talks about them, as well as a fire that burned down the town's school house.

In the third interview session, conducted at the Benton County Historical Museum in Philomath on May 30, 1992, Nyls continues discussing his early life in Wauna, including his social life. He describes the railroad service to Wauna. He again looks at photographs of Wauna and talks about them, as well as the fire that burned down the town's schoolhouse. He briefly discusses living in a small town near Westport during the Depression. He then talks about living in the sawmill company town of Warrenton, including his education, his involvement with sports, and fishing in the Skipanon River. He also talks about his social life in Warrenton. He discusses living in Astoria, particularly his experience during high school, including dating, playing in a band, and his experience in the National Guard. He also briefly describes a photograph of his family picking hops during the Depression. He speaks about roller skating, dancing, and drinking alcohol.

In the fourth interview session, conducted in Philomath on June 20, 1992, Nyls discusses living in Portland and working for the Forest Service through the National Youth Association. He then talks about working for Boeing in Seattle, Washington, in the years before World War II and about joining the Army Air Corps. He speaks about morale at Boeing after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and describes his feelings about the U.S. government's incarceration of Japanese Americans. He describes his Army Air Corps training at length, including both boot camp and flight training. He also talks about his marriage to Lucile Tinker.

In the fifth interview session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland on July 26, 1992, Nyls looks at photographs dating from the Korean War, describes them, and speaks at length about his experiences as an engineering officer and fighter pilot during that war. He also shares his thoughts about friendly fire and the United States military. He discusses training other fighter pilots and speaks at length about training to become an engineering officer at the end of World War II. He also talks about his marriage to Peggy Garver and the death of his mother. He discusses the differences in the way the Air Force fought during World War II and in the Korean War and speaks about his career in the Air Force after the war's end.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted in Philomath on September 12, 1992, Nyls looks at photographs from his career in the Air Force after the Korean War and describes them. He talks about serving as a squadron commander, describes serving on an Air Force base in Alaska during the Cold War, and shares his experiences serving at Camp Adair during the 1962 Columbus Day Storm. He talks about his reasons for settling in Eugene after retiring from the Air Force and reflects on his career, revisiting the topics of his service during World War II and the Korean War. He also describes more photographs. He discusses his children, their families, and their careers; shares his opinion about the Gulf War; and speaks at length about his hobbies, including his interest in history, geology, and astronomy. He closes the interview by talking about his work as a UFO investigator while in the Air Force.

Nyls, Raymond W. (Raymond Woodrow), 1920-2019

Oral history interview with Rudolph Luscher

  • SR 1038
  • Collection
  • 1984-08-16

This oral history interview with Rudolph Luscher was conducted by Susan G. Tissot at Luscher's home in West Linn, Oregon, on August 16, 1984. Bill Tegart and another unidentified person were also present and often contributed to the interview. At the time of the interview, Tissot's name was Susan Gaughan.

In this interview, Luscher discusses his family background and early life in Fairview. He speaks at length about running a dairy farm in Lake Oswego, including technology for milking cows, feeding his cattle, and changes in the dairy business over the 20th century. He briefly revisits the topic of his early life in Fairview, including his education. He then returns to talking about running a dairy farm in Lake Oswego, including the finances of dairying.

Luscher, Rudolph, 1901-1997

Oral history interview with Clyde Rice

  • SR 1054
  • Collection
  • 1985-01-22 - 1985-03-13

This oral history interview with Clyde Rice was conducted by Rick Harmon at Rice's home in Clackamas, Oregon, from January 22 to March 13, 1985. The interview was conducted in seven sessions. The audio on tapes 3, 4, 6, and 13 is affected by speed issues.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 22, 1985, Rice discusses his family background, particularly his father's flavor extract business. He talks about his early life in Portland and Salem, including his family's Christian Science faith, his social life, and his relationship with his family.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 29, 1985, Rice continues discussing his early life in Portland and Salem, including his family's Christian Science faith. He tells several anecdotes about his early school life; describes racism he observed; and shares his memories of World War I.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 7, 1985, Rice discusses his involvement with the Portland Art Museum School (now known as the Pacific Northwest College of Art), including the professors and curators. He talks about the artistic community in Portland and discusses his own art. He revisits the topic of racism that he observed and Portland politics in the early 20th century.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 14, 1985, Rice continues discussing Portland politics in the early 20th century. He then talks about homesteading in Clackamas County during the 1930s and describes clearing the land, hunting, and farming. He discusses returning to Portland a few years later and working for his father's flavor extract business. He talks about his marriage to Marguerite Evelyn "Nordi" Nordstrom, and about meeting his second wife, Virginia Lee Broms.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 21, 1985, Rice describes building a rammed earth house in the Mt. Scott neighborhood of Portland during the late 1930s. He speaks at length about his affair with Virginia Lee Broms. He also revisits the topic of working for his father's flavor extract business. He talks about spending time in Alaska before his divorce from Nordi Rice, his marriage to Virginia Lee Broms, and how both events affected his son.

In the seventh and final interview session, conducted on March 13, 1985, Rice continues discussing his development as an author. He describes the years-long process of writing and publishing his first novel, "A Heaven in the Eye." He also talks about plans to publish his other writings.

Rice, Clyde, 1903-1998

Oral history interview with Annette M. Bartholomae

  • SR 1055
  • Collection
  • 1992-08-27 - 1992-09-03

This oral history interview with Annette M. Bartholomae was conducted by Sieglinde Smith from August 27 to September 3, 1992. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 27, 1992, Bartholomae discusses her family background and talks about her adoptive family. She describes her early life in Portland, Oregon, including her early education and recreational activities. She also talks about her early interest in reading and libraries. She speaks about her experience at Reed College. She then talks about studying library science at Columbia University in New York. She also talks about working as a children's librarian at the Arleta library branch in Portland.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 3, 1992, Bartholomae discusses working as head librarian at the library in Pocatello, Idaho, and describes her life there. She then talks about working as a librarian for the U.S. Army's Camp White in Medford, Oregon, during World War II. She also talks about meeting her future husband, George Bartholomae, while working at the army camp, and discusses his experiences during World War I and II. She then discusses working as social services librarian at Portland State University, including taking classes at the university. She discusses working at the Oregon Historical Society Research Library at the end of her professional career. She also talks about working as a librarian at the Multnomah County Public Library. She describes her master's thesis for PSU, talks about her interest in Civil War history, and discusses the origins of her name. She closes the interview by talking about her education at library school.

Bartholomae, Annette M. (Annette Martha), 1908-1997

Oral history interview with Bertha Holt

  • SR 1059
  • Collection
  • 1984

This oral history interview with Bertha Holt was conducted by an unidentified interviewer circa 1984. The interviewer's questions have been edited out.

In this interview, Holt discusses her early life and marriage to Harry Holt. She speaks at length about adopting children from South Korea and founding Holt International Children's Services with Harry Holt. She talks about the death of Harry Holt. She describes her passion for her work facilitating intercounty adoption from South Korea.

The audio recording ends with a 1961 audio letter that Harry Holt sent to Martha Sue, one of the children whose adoption he helped to arrange. In the audio letter, Holt talks about his work helping orphaned children in Seoul, South Korea, and tells the story of Martha Sue's adoption process.

Holt, Bertha

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1067
  • Collection
  • 1992

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by Allan F. Schulte, Hart's grandson, in 1992. The interview was recorded on the audiocassettes out of order.

In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, as well as his education at Moran School and Stanford University. He talks about investigating the Red Squad in Portland while he was an assistant U.S. attorney; about his time in the Department of Justice; and about his work prosecuting a case against the American Medical Association. He discusses getting drafted into the Army and his experiences in the Pacific theater during World War II. He speaks about being chairman of Maurine Neuberger's election campaign in 1960. He discusses his law career, including cases he worked on; working with Lindsay, Hart, Neil & Weigler in Portland; and nearly being appointed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by sharing his childhood memories of World War I.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Al Monner

  • SR 1068
  • Collection
  • 1993-02-25 - 1993-03-04

This oral history interview with Al Monner was conducted by Donald J. Sterling at Monner's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to March 4, 1993. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1993, Monner discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Kaskela, Oregon, including his education, his sister, and his recreational activities. He then talks about moving to Portland in 1923, his high school education, and his early interest in photography. He speaks about working for a public library, attending Linfield College, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He discusses working for Photo Art Studio, his friendship with Ray Atkeson, and his involvement with the Wy'east Climbers.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 4, 1993, Monner revisits the topics of his family background, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He speaks about his early career as a photographer for the Oregonian newspaper and describes his photography equipment. He then discusses his career as a photographer for the Oregon Journal newspaper, his photography equipment, and some of his assignments. He also talks about his freelance work, as well as photography he did for himself; photographers he worked with, including Minor White; and his involvement with the Mazamas and mountain climbing. He speaks about his marriage to Catherine Elizabeth Gnadinger, and about his children, their careers, and their families. He speaks at length about photographing Portland's Romani community and Native Americans. He then talks about Catherine Elizabeth Monner's death in 1961 and his retirement activities. He closes the interview by discussing famous people and events that he photographed.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow

  • SR 1071
  • Collection
  • 1985-08-22 - 1985-09-26

This oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow was conducted by Bill Koen at Furrow's home near Odell, Oregon, from August 22 to September 26, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 22, 1985, Furrow discusses her family background, particularly regarding her grandfather, Peter Mohr, who owned the first commercial orchard in Hood River, Oregon. She describes daily life on the family orchard and dairy farm in Hood River. She talks about working as a fruit packer for Nakamura Orchards.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 26, 1985, Furrow shares her observations of the treatment of the Japanese community in Hood River during World War II, and describes racial discrimination in Hood River. She revisits the topic of daily life on her family's orchard and dairy farm in Hood River, and talks about the gendered division of labor. She describes her work picking and packing fruit for Nakamura Orchards. She talks about the ranch she ran with her husband, William Henry Furrow, and discusses selling their fruit through Diamond Fruit Growers Inc. She discusses the future of small farms in Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her involvement in the Hood River County Historical Society.

Furrow, Margaret L. (Margaret Lucille), 1913-2001

Oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti

  • SR 1074
  • Collection
  • 1987-03-26 - 1987-04-30

This oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, Oregon, from March 26 to April 30, 1987, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 26, 1987, Petti discusses her family background and early life in Vernonia, Oregon, including her family's history in the hotel business, her education, and her experience during the Depression. She talks about living and working in Portland during the Depression and describes how she came to work for Henry Thiele. She discusses her relationship with and marriage to Henry Thiele. She also talks about participating in illegal gambling and going to speakeasies in the 1930s.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 2, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her early life in Vernonia, including her family's history in the hotel business and taking piano lessons. She then continues discussing her marriage to Henry Thiele, and speaks at length about Thiele's life and career. She talks about managing the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, about serving alcohol after 1952, and about catering for the Kaiser shipyards during World War II. She discusses the menu at the Henry Thiele Restaurant, and talks about working with food suppliers. She then looks at photographs and talks about them.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 9, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her marriage to Henry Thiele and talks about their home in Lake Oswego. She talks about Henry Thiele's involvement with Christian Science. She also revisits the topic of managing Henry Thiele Restaurant, and discusses serving alcohol, talks about managing her staff, and shares the history of the restaurant. She shares her opinions on national politics. She describes a failed deal to sell the restaurant in 1986.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 30, 1987, Petti continues to discuss managing Henry Thiele Restaurant and talks about the restaurant's clientele. She also talks about her social life at the time of the interview in 1987. She then discusses her marriage to August Petti. She talks about her plans for the future and about traveling with August Petti. The interview closes with Petti looking at photographs and talking about them.

Petti, Margaret Thiele, 1916-2001

Oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider

  • SR 1075
  • Collection
  • 1985-04-18 - 1985-04-25

This oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider was conducted by Rick Harmon at the Schneiders' home in Portland, Oregon, from April 18-25, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 18, 1985, the Schneider brothers discuss their family history and early life in Portland. They speak at length about their first family home in Southeast Portland and they describe the appliances and utilities the house had in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They then describe the family home that they moved to in 1910. They also talk about the jobs they held, their education, and their recreational activities. They share their memories of Oaks Amusement Park, of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, and of the early Portland Rose Festival parades.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 25, 1985, the Schneider brothers continue to discuss their early life in Portland, including their recreational activities, their involvement with the Catholic Church, and their education. They also talk about their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company. They then discuss their experiences serving in the U.S. Army during World War I. Nicholas Schneider also talks about experiencing anti-German and anti-Catholic discrimination. They close the interview by revisiting the topic of their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company.

Schneider, Nicholas, 1892-1989

Oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton

  • SR 1076
  • Collection
  • 1991-09-10 - 1991-12-13

This oral history interview with Dorothy H. Thornton was conducted by Nancy Hawver from September 10 to December 13, 1991, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 10, 1991, Thornton discusses her family background and early life in Tillamook, Oregon, including her parents' involvement with the Tillamook Creamery Association. She talks about her early education, her recreational activities, and her early interest in art. She discusses a trip she took to Europe in 1935. She talks about her experiences in high school and at the University of Oregon. She also revisits the topics of the Tillamook Creamery Association and her early life in Tillamook. She discusses her marriage to Robert Y. Thornton and talks about his legal and political career.

In the second interview session, conducted on October 17, 1991, Thornton discusses her experience during World War II and talks about working in the blimp factory in Tillamook. She also talks about Robert Y. Thornton's service in the U.S. Army during the war. She discusses Robert Y. Thornton's study of Japanese and her own study of art. She then discusses living in Tillamook at the end of the war, talks about her involvement in the Tillamook Library Board, and about raising her son, Thomas Wells Thornton.

In the third interview session, conducted on November 22, 1991, Thornton discusses living in Salem after Robert Y. Thornton was elected to the Oregon State Legislature in 1950 and talks about her experiences as a wife of a politician, her involvement with the Bush House Auxiliary, and her interest in art and photography. She also talks about cases Robert Y. Thornton worked on as state attorney general.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on December 13, 1991, Thornton continues to discuss living in Salem, including her involvement in early childhood education. She also continues to discuss Robert Y. Thornton's career as state attorney general. She talks about her involvement in the Arts in Oregon Council and other arts organizations; describes her cornea transplant surgery; and discusses taking art classes. She talks about a trip she took to Japan in the late 1950s, about attending attorneys general conventions, and about the establishment of the Grove of the States in 1967. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement with the Portland Art Museum and other arts organizations.

Thornton, Dorothy H. (Dorothy Haberlach), 1913-2005

Oral history interview with Herbert A. Schroeder

  • SR 1078
  • Collection
  • 1975-03

This oral history interview with Herbert A. Schroeder was conducted in four sessions by Herman LeRoy Grafe in March 1975. Willis Raymond Grafe and Lois Lennox were also present and contributed to the interview. The audio of the first two interview sessions is very poor; there is bleed-through of choral music and the speakers' voices echo. The tapes also contain several minutes of unrelated audio content.

In the first interview session, Lois Lennox discusses her family background.

In the second interview session, Herbert Schroeder discusses his family background, including homesteading in Oregon, running a sawmill, and logging. He also talks about mining operations.

In the third interview session, Schroeder, Willis Raymond Grafe, and Herman LeRoy Grafe speak about family matters. They also revisit the topics of homesteading in Oregon, running a sawmill, and logging.

In the fourth interview session, Schroeder and Herman LeRoy Grafe have a casual conversation. Television is played loudly in the background.

Schroeder, Herbert A. (Herbert Alfred), 1887-1984

Oral history interview with David Irving

  • SR 1084
  • Collection
  • 1992-02-05

This oral history interview with David Irving was conducted by Mark Flint on February 5, 1992. In this interview, Irving discusses working with Glenn Jackson at Pacific Power and Light Company, and speaks at length about Jackson's personality and accomplishments. He also talks about Glenn Jackson and Helen Jackson's marriage and Jackson's involvement in politics.

Irving, David

Oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim

  • SR 1086
  • Collection
  • 1989-07-26 - 1989-09-13

This oral history interview with Adam C. Heim and Clara C. Heim was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Heims' home in Portland, Oregon, from July 26 to September 13, 1989, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in five sessions. Adam C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 1 and 2; Clara C. Heim was interviewed in sessions 3 and 4; and both were interviewed together in session 5.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 26, 1989, Adam C. Heim discusses his family background, including his Russian and German heritage and his father's career with the Union Pacific Railroad Company. He talks about his early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, including his education and recreational activities. He speaks about working on a sugar beet farm in Idaho; about the Portland harbor; and about his apprenticeship as a machinist for the Union Pacific Railroad.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 2, 1989, Adam C. Heim talks about his siblings, particularly his older brother, John Adams Heim. He continues to discuss his career with the Union Pacific Railroad. He talks about his marriage to Clara C. Heim and about raising their children. He speaks about his experiences living in Huntington, Oregon, during the Depression, including the death of one of his children from spinal meningitis. He also discusses returning to Portland in the 1940s; talks about his children, their families, and their careers; and describes being injured during a robbery.

In the third interview session, conducted on August 29, 1989, Clara C. Heim discusses her family background and early life in North Portland. She talks about her siblings, their families, and their careers. She discusses her health as a child, her education, and working as a telephone operator.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on September 7, 1989, Clara C. Heim continues to discuss her early life in North Portland. She talks about her marriage to Adam C. Heim, about raising a family, and about her experiences during the Depression. She discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She speaks about life in Huntington, and about her political beliefs.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on September 13, 1989, Clara C. Heim and Adam C. Heim discuss living in and raising a family in Huntington and in North Portland during and after World War II. They also talk about the Black population in North Portland. They speak about their relationship with their children, about the changes in the Catholic Church, and about their political beliefs. They close the interview by talking about their recreational activities.

Heim, Adam C. (Adam Clarence), 1902-1995

Oral history interview with Donald W. McInnis

  • SR 1087
  • Collection
  • 1992-08-25 - 1992-11-10

This oral history interview with Donald W. McInnis was conducted by Mary Gorsline from August 25 to November 10, 1992. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 25, 1992, McInnis speaks at length about his family background and how they came to settle near Reedville, Oregon, including his parents' overland journey to the Pacific Northwest. He speaks in detail about driving oxen-drawn wagons. He talks about his early life on a homestead near Reedville, including the store his father ran, meeting his future wife, Julia Flint, and working at a feed mill. He describes the communities of Hazeldale and Reedville, including a story of a man who abused his horses; Chinese members of the community; and a lost cemetery. He also talks about the social life in those communities; Julia Flint's family background; and the wildlife in the Reedville area.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 10, 1992, McInnis discusses his father, Duncan Mullen McInnis, and his father's career as a police officer in Portland, his memories of the general store his father ran, and the fire that burned the store down. He shares more stories from his early life and talks about his education. He closes the interview by talking about using public transportation in the Portland area in the early 20th century, working on the family dairy farm in Ridgefield, Washington, and loading Fresno scrapers, a type of earthmoving machinery.

McInnis, Donald W. (Donald William), 1900-1994

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting

  • SR 1092
  • Collection
  • 2019-07-01 - 2019-12-02

This oral history interview with Vince Whiting was conducted by Kim L. Andrews from July 1 to December 2, 2019, at the Brookwood branch of the Washington County Public Library in Hillsboro, Oregon. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 1, 2019, Whiting discusses the life and career of his first wife, Pat Whiting. He talks about her education at San Jose State University and their early marriage. He discusses his own education at San Jose State University, Chico State University, and Oregon State University and his plan to become a veterinarian. He also briefly talks about his wife at the time of the interview, Amira Whiting. He discusses Pat Whiting's service in the Oregon State Legislature, including her work on legislation regarding the ban of chlorofluorocarbons, and describes her personality. Whiting briefly discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois. He then talks about moving to Oregon with Pat Whiting around 1968, and his career with GlaxoSmithKline. He discusses Pat Whiting's political philosophy and speaks at length about her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and how she interacted with her constituents. He speaks about the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, her interest in environmentalism, and the environmental legislation she worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting's views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting's work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

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