Showing 648 results

Collections
William L. Finley Papers, 1899-1946 United States With digital objects
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

Dispersal of seeds

Manuscript explaining how seeds travel and spread. The document includes an interaction with a squirrel.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Owl of the Arctic

Manuscript about the Arctic owl, focusing on the bird's appearance, hunting habits, and its habitat.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Golden eagle nearly wrecks car

Manuscript recalling a collision of Mr. Echidnas and an eagle. Fortunately the bird survived and was put into the care of Dr. L. E. Hibbard. The author goes on to point out that this eagle is protected by law but sadly has been exterminated in several parts of the Pacific Northwest.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Klamath waterfowl mat stage a good comeback

Manuscript that relays the struggle of farmers and land owners versus the Reclamation Services in respects to the lake beds in the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake areas. It was recognized that the drying of the beds is destructive to the local waterfowl because of a lack of a reliable water source. For the farmers and land owners, they would rather see the land as a place of cultivation. The Reclamation Service believed that only a small part could realistically be kept under cultivation. Part of the area in question became a sump and instead of using all of the land for that purpose, a refuge area was set aside which became the Tule Lake Refuge.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Uncle Sam takes life insurance for his family

Manuscript discusses the importance of forests and the reality that upkeep is costly and time consuming. Author advocates that the American government should finance this and praises the work being done by the Forest Service. The program took unemployed young men from metropolitan areas and placed them into service for the forests. Not only was this beneficial for the forests, but the author contends that the young men free of the bad influences of the city, made the government's investment sound.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Californian interest in Oregon

Manuscript discussing the interest Californians were taking in Southern Oregon for recreation, especially in respects to angling in the Rogue, Umpqua, and Wilson rivers. The author points out that these are smaller streams and for the fishermen who depend on the rivers for their livelihood could be greatly affected by Californians' recreational fishing.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Restoring Oregon forests

Manuscript describing an article written by Cory Ford and Alastair MacBain. The main focus of this document is restoring our forests in order to provide the necessary habitats for the fish and wildlife. The practice of raising animals in hatcheries and releasing them back in to the wild for sport is pointless when the environment is polluted and kills the animals.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Mountain sheep or bighorn

Manuscript that discusses the dwindling numbers of the Bighorn sheep. Contributing factors to the decrease of Bighorns include hunting and contact with domestic sheep. The domestic sheep contributed the most in the decline due to a disease they carried and spread to the Bighorns. The author advocates for a refuge for the remaining Bighorns in order to remove any contact from domestic sheep in both the summer and winter seasons.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Columbia River pollution

Manuscript describing the problem of pollutants being dumped into the Willamette River and later traveling to the Columbia River where pollution is killing the fish. The author asserts that individual sportsmen and anglers have to follow the pollution laws but companies are not being held to the same standard. The author also states that citizens of Portland were initially on board to install sewage systems but support vanished once it was realized that the funding would come from property owners and not the government.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The opossum, new settler coming to Oregon

The author in this manuscript describes an incoming resident to the Oregon landscape, the opossum. In this document the diet of the animal, its ecological preferences, and where it can be typically found are among the topics discussed. According to this text, the animal is one of the oldest living mammals and the oldest of the group in America.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The romance of swans sometimes goes haywire

Manuscript chronicling the failure of introducing two male swans to two female swans who had been companions for a few years. The author points out that partners should be introduced in the first two years of life as swans mate for life. After such a long period of association, the two birds became dependent upon each other for all types of companionship long before the males were introduced.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Wealth may come from primitive areas in Oregon

Manuscript that examines the uptick of interest and financial gain in Oregon's outdoors. A particular interest in the Rogue River Valley is explored. The author comments on the amount of funds for paving roads in order to allow people to access the wilderness easily. The document also points out that there are many ways to destroy natural areas, but few are considering how to preserve them.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Oregon upland game bird survival

Manuscript delving into the difficult situation of population increase in Oregon and how that is effecting the game birds of the area. The author sees two options of dealing with this predicament. The first is to use the funding for game farms to breed Chinese pheasants and release them for hunting use. The second is to enact a plan to save the disappearing native game birds. This option is difficult because it requires extensive research before a plan can be considered. The author contends that the best people to aid with this research are young students trained in scientific thinking, who possess patience and a good work ethic.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Flocking of the swallows

Manuscript on the spotting of a large group of swallows near a roadside. The author goes on to discuss how the birds are joined by other flocks to travel in large groups in order to hide their true numbers from predators.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Late nesting of bobwhite quail

Manuscript that relays the discovery of a bobwhite quail's nest in January, which is fairly late in the nesting season. The remaining content describes the value of the bird on farms.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Needless destruction of game resources

Manuscript that explores the senseless killing of wild animals. Despite being a protected animal, a black bear mother and cub had been shot down. The author contends that black bears are the most human of wild animals in the Oregon woods. The author also describes characteristics of the bear and what it eats. The document goes on to say that there are people who simply enjoy being out in nature and can truly appreciate a wildlife sighting. However, due to hunters, those people are robbed of these experiences.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Game management school at Corvallis

Manuscript praising the establishment of the Oregon State Agricultural College. There is praise also for the courses in game management that will be offered. The courses are considered to be the best measurement instituted in order to develop wildlife resources for Oregon. The college will offer several courses that will provide training for game management of estates and land using industries. Local establishments such as game refuges and fish hatcheries will be used to give hands on experience. At the time, Oregon was the only state in the west to receive federal funding for education in respects to conservation of wildlife.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Records of ducks over baited waters

Manuscript that delves into the game records for duck hunting, finding that the two states with the largest number of birds bagged were permitted to use bait. The author explains that the reason why there was such a concentration of birds in California and Illinois, is that they lie on the most naturally attractive waterways. Other states are mentioned, but the main focus is on California and Illinois. The document goes on to say that the practice of baiting creates an unfair advantage and those that do not bait tend to later follow after seeing the baiters' success. The federal government banned the use of bait in respects to duck hunting.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The American white pelican

Manuscript that focuses on the American white pelican, which according to this document, has an unattractive appearance. The document also describes how the pelican feeds its young.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Wild or band-tailed pigeons

Manuscript that looks over a few previous records of wild pigeons provided by O. G. Delaba and W. B. Jennings. There is a note in parentheses asking to report any spottings of the birds to Finley or Averill. The author reflects that the number of pigeons has declined dramatically.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Robins kick older children out

Manuscript describing a pair of robins whose older offspring attempted to bait their parents into feeding them, despite being old enough to feed themselves.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Rabbits and hares

Manuscript stating that jack rabbits are not rabbits, instead belonging to the hare family.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Sleeping off the winter

Manuscript discusses discovering a gray digger squirrel who appeared to be deceased but was actually hibernating and nearly frozen. This leads the author to write about the animal's process in preparing for its winter slumber. The document goes on to comment on other animals that hibernate as well and the differences in hibernation processes.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Waterfowl protection and other manuscripts

Manuscript that is composed of various manuscripts, with a focus on closing the waterfowl hunting season. The manuscripts concerning the waterfowl include creating legislation to close or limit the hunting season, the practice of baiting, and protecting waterfowl populations. A manuscript discussing russet-backed thrushes is included.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The white-crowned sparrow

Manuscript where one species of sparrow is featured. The document begins with explaining that only an expert can distinguish the three varieties of this sparrow.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Trout flies

According to R.E. Dimick from the Oregon State Agricultural College, the stonefly is a cornerstone in the diet of trout. The manuscript advises that a wise angler will observe the insects of an area to lead them to the best fishing spots. The document goes on to describe the life cycle of the stonefly as well as mentioning another type of stonefly, and where the author has found their population to be abundant.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Wholesale waterfowl destruction in the Klamath Country

Manuscript discusses how the waterfowl in Klamath country are now protected from hunters by game laws. The Bureau of Reclamation destroyed areas of sanctuary for waterfowl because the demand for land for agricultural use was so high. According to Dr. C. F. Marbut from the Department of Agriculture, the soil from the land in and around the bed of the Lower Klamath Lake could not support agricultural means successfully. Instead, the area became a refuge similar to Clear Lake.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Results 113 to 140 of 648