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Oregon Black History Project records

  • Mss 2854
  • Collection
  • 1844-1981

The Oregon Black History Project was a grant-funded project that conducted research on the history of African-Americans in Oregon up to the beginning of World War II. The project was directed by Elizabeth McLagan and culminated in her book "A Peculiar Paradise: A History of Blacks in Oregon, 1788-1940," which was published by the Georgian Press of Portland, Oregon, in 1980.

The collection consists of administrative records, research files, and photographs gathered or created by the Oregon Black History Project. Most of the research files consist of notes and quotes, photocopies, or excerpts from primary and secondary resources concerning the history of African-Americans in Oregon from the late 18th century to the mid-20th century. Most of these source excerpts were assembled between 1976 and 1979. Topics include early African-American emigrants to Oregon; the slavery debate in Oregon; exclusion laws and other forms of discrimination or violence against African-Americans; African-American business, social, and activist organizations; and early 20th-century African-American newspapers such as The Advocate, the New Age, and the Portland Times.

Photographs include portraits of African-American Oregonians; African-American social groups and activities; residences; and businesses operated by African-Americans in Portland, Oregon. Some of the photographs are copies of images originally published in newspapers such as Portland Times and The Advocate.

McLagan, Elizabeth, 1947-

Oral history interview with Charles A. Sprague

  • SR 155
  • Collection
  • 1962-07-18

This interview with Charles A. Sprague was conducted by Robert Bruce of the Capitol News Bureau in Sprague's office at the Oregon Statesman in Salem on July 18, 1962. It was broadcast on the radio as part of the Living History Series. In the interview, Sprague briefly discusses his family history and early life in the Midwest. He then talks about his career in journalism and ownership of the Corvallis Gazette-Times and the Statesman, as well as big news stories during that time, including the labor movement. Sprague also discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his term as governor of Oregon during World War II. He also talks about landmark legislation that was passed during his term, particularly the establishment of the state forest system, as well as his thoughts on amending the Oregon Constitution. He closes the interview with a discussion about contemporary American culture.

Sprague, Charles A. (Charles Arthur), 1887-1969

Oral history interview with Tom McCall

  • SR 298
  • Collection
  • 1973-03-12

This oral history interview with Oregon Governor Tom McCall was conducted by Steve Lorton on March 12, 1973, and was one of a number of interviews with governors of Western states on the occasion of Sunset Magazine's 75th anniversary. McCall describes his experiences in government and politics, along with challenges including growth and conservation in Oregon. He mentions members of the Oregon Legislature, including Bob Packwood, Keith Miller, Daniel Evans, Cecil Andrus, and Richard Neuberger. He also discusses legislation that was forthcoming at the time of the interview, including the Oregon Bottle Bill. He closes the interview by discussing his plans for Oregon's future.

McCall, Tom, 1913-1983

Oral history interview with Wayne Morse

  • SR 779
  • Collection
  • 1967

This interview with Wayne Morse was conducted by William Plymat for the World Peace Broadcasting Foundation in November 1967. The interview was originally distributed on a disposable plastic 33.3 rpm disc as a thank-you for a donation to the World Peace Broadcasting Foundation of "a dollar or more." In the interview, Morse discusses his opposition to the war in Vietnam.

Morse, Wayne L. (Wayne Lyman), 1900-1974

Oral history interview with Bill Hedlund

  • SR 1113
  • Collection
  • 1988-06-19

This oral history interview with Bill Hedlund was conducted by Richard McConnell on June 19, 1988. An unidentified woman was also present. In this interview, Hedlund discusses his experience in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1941 to 1942, and his experiences as a lobbyist. He discusses legislators and lobbyists he worked with, rules regarding lobbying activities, his involvement with the Democratic Party, and governors he served under while in the Legislature. He then looks at photographs and discusses them, his family history, and his early life in Portland. He discusses how he got interested in politics after he graduated from law school in 1935, and his jobs before running for the Legislature in 1940, including working for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.

Hedlund, Bill (William Hancock), 1910-1994

Oral history interview with Chester E. McCarty

  • SR 1222
  • Collection
  • 1985-11-12 - 1987-09-01

This interview with Chester E. McCarty was conducted by Bill Koen in Portland, Oregon, on November 12, 1985, and by Jim Strassmaier at McCarty's office in Portland from August 4 to September 1, 1987. In this interview, McCarty discusses his family background and early life in Stage Gulch and Portland, Oregon, including working on the family farm during summers, his memories of World War I, and his education in Portland. He talks about selling advertisement space for the Oregonian newspaper while attending the Northwestern College of Law, and about his marriage to Julia Caroline Gromoff. He speaks at length about serving in the National Guard, beginning at age 15, and in the U.S. Army field artillery branch.

He discusses serving as assistant attorney general of Oregon from 1930 to 1936, including representing the Game Commission and the state police. He also discusses working as a lawyer in private practice, where he focused on aviation law. He talks about being a commercial pilot on the side, and relates several anecdotes about emergency landings. He also discusses serving in the state Senate in 1942, including his friendship with Dorothy McCullough Lee, as well as resigning shortly after his election to serve in World War II.

He speaks at length about his service in the U.S. Army Air Corps training pilots, and later commanding troops in the Middle East. He also talks about the activities of his wife, Julia Caroline Gromoff, during World War II. He then talks about returning to civilian life after the war and continuing his law practice in Portland, where he acted as defense counsel in numerous courts-martial. He talks about some of the judges he argued before, including Gus Solomon and James Alger Fee. He also discusses continuing to fly planes, as well as his service on the Port of Portland Commission. He discusses accepting the command of the Oregon Army Reserves, getting activated for the Korean War, and his continued service in the Air Force until his retirement in 1966. He closes the interview by discussing serving with Glenn Jackson in North Africa during World War II.

McCarty, Chester E. (Chester Earl), 1905-1999

Oral history interview with Floyd H. Hart, Jr.

  • SR 1176
  • Collection
  • circa 1969

This oral history interview with Floyd H. Hart, Jr. was conducted by Bob Reese circa 1969 at the Capitol studio in Salem, Oregon. In this interview, Hart discusses his efforts for property tax relief legislation. He also discusses the need for a sales tax to help fund public schools. He goes on to talk about pending legislation regarding air and water pollution.

After about 10 minutes of dead air, this tape also includes the swearing-in ceremony of Lee Johnson to the office of Oregon attorney general in 1969, including a short speech Johnson made to the Oregon Legislature.

Hart, Floyd H., Jr. (Floyd Henry), 1931-2014

Minor White negatives

  • Org. Lot 52
  • Collection
  • 1938-1940

This collection consists of 210 black-and-white negatives shot by Minor White during his time in Oregon betwen 1938 and 1940. The bulk of the negatives, and of particular note, are White's photographs of numerous buildings and blocks - primarily cast-iron-fronted - near the Portland waterfront, which include, in part: the Miles Building, the Hotel Portland, the New Market Block, the Snow Building, the Opitz Building, and the Starr Block. Many of these buildings are no longer standing.

White, Minor

Oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman

  • SR 9042
  • Collection
  • 1981-09-17

This oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Eugene, Oregon, on September 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Freeman discusses her early life on a farm in Colton, Oregon; attending Oregon State University; and working as a math teacher in Oregon and California. She then talks about settling in Eugene after her marriage to Neil Freeman, and about teaching mathematics at the University of Oregon from 1943 to 1949. She discusses how her involvement in Lane County politics began with a Democratic speechwriting contest in which she took second place, losing to future U. S. Rep. Edith Green. She talks about serving as precinct committee chair, her involvement with the League of Women Voters, and running for the Oregon Legislature in 1952. She discusses her reasons for joining the Democratic Party and her campaign for Lane County treasurer. She speaks at length about her accomplishments as treasurer. Freeman talks about feeling as if the county commissioners didn't hold the office of treasurer in high esteem and how that pushed her to run for Lane County clerk in 1960. She discusses her accomplishments as county clerk, then describes how the office of county clerk was changed to an appointed position rather than elected, which led to her losing the position. She closes the interview by talking about her activities during retirement, including freelance writing.

Freeman, Olga Samuelson, 1903-1997

Oral history interview with Norma Paulus

  • SR 9065
  • Collection
  • 1982-01-14

This oral history interview with Norma Paulus was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in the Capitol Building in Salem, Oregon, on January 14, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In the interview, Paulus discusses her family background and early life, particularly how her family was affected by the Depression. She talks about leaving Nebraska for Oregon due to the Dust Bowl drought, picking hops as seasonal workers, and growing up on an oil rig in Burns, Oregon. She talks about being unable to afford college even with scholarships, working for the Harney County district attorney, and moving to Salem to work as a legal secretary. She also describes having polio at age 19. She then talks about working as a legal secretary for the Oregon Supreme Court, her involvement with the Pentacle Theatre in Salem, and her studies at Willamette University Law School. She discusses working for state Senator Wally Carson. She then talks about running for the Oregon House of Representatives in 1970 and the opposition she faced due to her gender; learning about and embracing feminism; and other women in the Legislature. She closes the interview by talking about her decision to run for Oregon secretary of state in 1976.

Paulus, Norma

Oral history interview with Agnes Barchus

  • SR 9407
  • Collection
  • 1980-03-03

This oral history interview with Agnes Barchus was conducted by Karen A. Reyes at Barchus' home in Portland, Oregon, on March 3, 1980. In this interview, Barchus discusses the art career of her mother, Eliza R. Barchus, including her exhibits at the Portland Hotel and the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, as well as her innovation of selling prints of her paintings on postcards. Barchus also shares her memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, describing many of the buildings and exhibits in detail. She describes some of the houses that her mother built in Portland, her mother's practice of paying her bills in trade, and her mother's efforts to save several boxwood trees from a construction project. She talks about the renewed interest in her mother's artwork after Eliza Barchus' death in 1959, exhibitions of her mother's work in the 1960s and 1970s, and the passage of a resolution naming Eliza Barchus "The Oregon Artist."

Barchus, Agnes, 1893-1983

Oral history interview with Wilber Henderson

  • SR 9448
  • Collection
  • 1965?

This oral history interview with Wilber Henderson was conducted by Charles S. Crookham in Crookham's chambers at the Multnomah County Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, around 1965. The date is given as September 23. Stephen Parker was also present. Parker's name was given in the audio, but not spelled. The spelling of his name cannot be verified.

In this interview, Henderson speaks at length about his involvement in a balloon race during the 1914 Rose Festival in Portland, and his experiences of being lost in the woods after an emergency landing. He then discusses his military service during the Mexican Border War. He closes the interview by discussing how he earned the nickname Major.

Henderson, Wilber, 1887-1966

Oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland

  • SR 11133
  • Collection
  • 2003-08-18

This oral history interview with Monroe Sweetland was conducted by John Moltman at Sweetland's home in Milwaukie, Oregon. The recording of Moltman's interview with Sweetland is incomplete. According to the audio, the interview was conducted in multiple sessions; this recording includes only one session, which was conducted on August 18, 2003. No other recordings from the interview were among those donated to the Oregon Historical Research Library in 2007.

In this interview, Sweetland discusses his involvement with the Student League for Industrial Democracy during the Depression and his parents' disapproval. He talks about meeting Lil Megrath and their subsequent marriage. He describes organizing Student L.I.D. conferences and establishing chapters across the country. He talks about advocating for civil rights and the opposition he faced, particularly in the South. He also talks about socialism and how it differs from communism, as well as the growing socialist movement among students and labor during the 1930s. He discusses his involvement with the Socialist Party, including his friendship with Socialist Party leader Norman Thomas, and the socialist underpinnings of the New Deal. He gives a brief history of the evolution of the Democratic and Republican parties over the 20th century, and of progressive political movements. He shares anecdotes about his activities with the Student L.I.D., including participating in sit-down strikes and being arrested.

Sweetland, Monroe, 1910-2006

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

  • SR 9431
  • Collection
  • 1982-05-14

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on May 14, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Edwards discusses his duties regarding the selection of horses as a civilian agent for the Remount Service during World War II. He talks about the history of the American Remount Service and how the horses were used during both war and peacetime. He also discusses his duties selecting dogs for military use. He then talks about serving on the Oregon Racing Commission under Governor Douglas O. McKay after the war. He briefly describes lobbying for the Oregon State Cattlemen's Association and working as chief clerk of the Oregon House of Representatives. He then speaks at length about his experiences as secretary of the Senate. He talks about the changes in the Legislature during the 20th century, including salaries, staff sizes, and session length. He tells the story of discovering that the federal government owed a debt to Oregon dating back to the Civil War. Edwards talks about the fire that destroyed the Capitol building in 1935, the places where the Legislature convened afterwards, and the construction of the new Capitol. He closes the interview by talking a little about some of the governors he served under.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Bud Clark

  • SR 2084
  • Collection
  • 1995-04-06

This oral history interview with Bud Clark was conducted by Joseph W. Carlisle on April 6, 1995. The equipment used to record this interview was faulty, causing the tape speed to vary widely. Digitized audio files made from the recording have been adjusted for ease of listening.

In this interview, Clark discusses transportation in Portland, including bicycles and the public transportation system, TriMet. He focuses particularly on the construction of the TriMet light-rail system, MAX. He discusses outdoor recreation in Portland. He then talks about his family background and early life in Portland. He also discusses his experiences at Vanport College (now Portland State University) and at Reed College. He talks about the livability and climate of Oregon, particularly the city of Portland.

Clark discusses the impact of urban renewal on Portland. He discusses running the Drop In Tavern, which he renamed the Spoutin' House; the tavern's location near Portland State University; and how urban renewal forced him out of business. He then talks about purchasing Ann's Tavern, which he renamed the Goose Hollow Inn. He speaks at length about his opinion of urban renewal at the time it was happening in the 1950s and 1960s, and his opinion of it in retrospect. Clark closes the interview by briefly discussing the urban renewal policies he put in place as mayor of Portland from 1984 to 1992.

Clark, Bud (J. E. "Bud")

Lily E. White photographs

  • Org. Lot 662
  • Collection
  • 1900-1905

Collection consists of 43 photographs taken by Lily E. White and other members of the Oregon Camera Club between 1900 and 1905. The photographs depict landscape scenes of the Columbia River Gorge, the Pacific coast, and Mount Hood. Also included are posed portraits of members of the Klikitat and other Columbia River tribes. The photographs are mounted platinum prints and all but two of the prints are signed by the artist. 38 of the photographs are part of a tooled suede leather portfolio. The portfolio also contains prints signed by Sarah Hall Ladd, Will H. Walker, and Maud Ainsworth. In addition to the portfolio, the collection also contains five prints signed by Lily E. White from a separate accession.

White, Lily E.

Oral history interview with Harold L. Pubols

  • SR 823
  • Collection
  • 1988-01-10 - 1988-01-22

This oral history interview with Harold Pubols was conducted by his niece, Louise Pubols, from January 10-22, 1988. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 10, 1988, Pubols discusses his family background and talks about how his family came to the United States, as well as his parents' marriage. He talks about his early life on a farm in Hillsboro, Oregon, including his education, daily life, and leaving home. He discusses his brother, John R. Pubols, including John R. Pubols' experience in the U.S. Army, his education, and his career. He then talks about his own education and playing sports. He discusses attending Columbia University, now known as the University of Portland, and then Oregon State University on football scholarships. He also talks about dating Frances Audrey Jones.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 22, 1988, Pubols returns to the topic of his family background and early life on a farm in Hillsboro, including raising livestock and suffering abuse at the hands of his father.

Pubols, Harold L. (Harold Louis), 1903-1993

Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

  • SR 1002
  • Collection
  • 1991-07-16 - 1992-04-29

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from July 16, 1991, to April 29, 1992. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 16, 1991, Frank discusses his family background and how it intertwines with the history of the Meier & Frank Company. He talks about the company's founding in 1857 by his great-grandfather, Aaron Meier, and the growth of the store during the 19th century, including the store's Friday Surprise marketing strategy and the buildings the store inhabited. He then talks about the history of Meier & Frank during the early 20th century, including his uncle Julius Meier's term as Oregon governor from 1931 to 1935, competition with other department stores in Portland, and Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He also talks about the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 6, 1991, Frank continues discussing the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank, including his management of the Meier & Frank Department Store beginning in 1937. He also continues discussing Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He talks about the use of credit lines in the department store, particularly during the Depression. He discusses the Meier & Frank board of directors, and begins talking about the expansion of the store into Salem.

In the third interview session, conducted on December 21, 1991, Frank continues discussing the expansion of the Meier & Frank Department Store into Salem. He talks about managing the Salem branch from 1955 to 1965, including tailoring merchandise to the Salem community, his involvement in Salem community organizations, and his relationship with his employees. He also talks about the store's seasonal events and his relationship with other Meier & Frank store managers.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 29, 1992, Frank discusses the conditions that led to the sale of the Meier & Frank Department Store to the May Company in 1965. He describes the family divisions surrounding the sale. He then talks about resigning as manager of the Salem branch and the effect of the sale on the store's personnel and customer base. He closes the interview by talking about his relationship with the management of the Meier & Frank Department Store at the time of the interview in 1992.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with Al Monner

  • SR 1068
  • Collection
  • 1993-02-25 - 1993-03-04

This oral history interview with Al Monner was conducted by Donald J. Sterling at Monner's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to March 4, 1993. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1993, Monner discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Kaskela, Oregon, including his education, his sister, and his recreational activities. He then talks about moving to Portland in 1923, his high school education, and his early interest in photography. He speaks about working for a public library, attending Linfield College, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He discusses working for Photo Art Studio, his friendship with Ray Atkeson, and his involvement with the Wy'east Climbers.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 4, 1993, Monner revisits the topics of his family background, and working as a developer and photographer for Brubaker Aerial Surveys. He speaks about his early career as a photographer for the Oregonian newspaper and describes his photography equipment. He then discusses his career as a photographer for the Oregon Journal newspaper, his photography equipment, and some of his assignments. He also talks about his freelance work, as well as photography he did for himself; photographers he worked with, including Minor White; and his involvement with the Mazamas and mountain climbing. He speaks about his marriage to Catherine Elizabeth Gnadinger, and about his children, their careers, and their families. He speaks at length about photographing Portland's Romani community and Native Americans. He then talks about Catherine Elizabeth Monner's death in 1961 and his retirement activities. He closes the interview by discussing famous people and events that he photographed.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Oral history interview with Johnnie O. Maxey

  • SR 4000
  • Collection
  • 1994-02-25 - 1994-06-30

This oral history interview with Johnnie Maxey was conducted by Aaron Brand at Maxey's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to June 30, 1994. Charles Britton Maxey was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview, which was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1994, Maxey discusses her family background and early life on a farm in Kilgore, Texas. She speaks at length about raising and preparing food; describes her childhood home; and talks about her early education. She then discusses attending Texas College, including meeting Charles Britton Maxey. She also talks about her mother's health, attending the AME Church, and racism she experienced. She discusses relocating to Portland in 1943; talks about the jobs that Charles Britton Maxey held; and describes her journey by train.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 31, 1991, Maxey revisits the topic of her early life in Kilgore, Texas, including her experience with rheumatic fever as a child, celebrating Juneteenth, and the community she grew up in. She also talks about her siblings and their families. She then discusses her life in Portland, including her social life, raising her family, and Charles Britton Maxey's career as a barber. She also talks about discrimination faced by the black community in Portland, including the lack jobs open to black people after World War II, the hostility towards black people in some neighborhoods, and the aftermath of the Vanport Flood. She discusses running a small grocery store, called Maxey's Better Buy Grocery, next door to her husband's barbershop.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 25, 1994, Maxey continues discussing Charles Britton Maxey's career as a barber and running the Maxeys' grocery store. She also talks about the experience of having two barbershops and their home seized by the state for the construction of the I-5 freeway. She speaks at length about dealing with customers; talks about other grocery stores in the neighborhood; and discusses her involvement in the community, including serving as president of her local parent teacher association. She also talks about school segregation and busing. She speaks at length about raising her children, and talks about their careers, as well as the racism they experienced.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on June 10, 1994, Maxey continues to discuss raising her children. She also talks about her relationship with her neighbors. She discusses her involvement with La Femme, which taught traditional etiquette to young girls, and talks about her involvement in her church, including its choir and working to promote black history to its congregation. She talks about racism she experienced in Portland, and how conditions for black people in Oregon have changed since the 1940s. She then briefly discusses Charles Britton Maxey's involvement with the Republican Party; shares her opinion on busing; and describes issues she had with some of her children's teachers. She also shares her memories of the civil rights movement.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on June 30, 1994, Maxey continues sharing her memories of the civil rights movement, and talks about how conditions for black people have changed in Oregon. She talks about black-owned businesses in North Portland, changes in the neighborhood, and changes in Portland's black community. She also briefly shares her political opinions. She speaks at length about her children, their careers, and their families. She closes the interview by talking about her grandchildren and her hopes for the future.

Maxey, Johnnie O. (Johnnie Obina), 1919-

Oral history interview with Charles B. Maxey

  • SR 4001
  • Collection
  • 1994-02-25 - 1994-11-18

This oral history interview with Charles B. Maxey was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Maxey's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to November 18, 1994. Johnnie Obina Maxey was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1994, Maxey discusses his family background and early life in St. Augustine and in Longview, Texas, including his education, growing up in a predominantly black neighborhood, and learning to navigate a racist world. He speaks at length about the importance of reading black authors in high school. He then discusses trying to find decent-paying work in Texas, Colorado, and Utah after graduating from college, and describes how he ultimately decided to settle in Portland, Oregon, in 1943. He talks about working in the shipyards in Portland during World War II and describes his frustration with being denied promotions and other job opportunities due to his youth and race. He then talks about beginning his career as a barber. He also reflects on his college experience at Texas College in Tyler, Texas, and talks about meeting Johnnie O. Maxey and his unrealized plans to go to law school. He discusses his political beliefs and involvement with the Republican Party in Oregon; talks about his first impressions of Portland; and describes how life in Oregon for black people differed from the South.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 4, 1994, Maxey revisits the topic of his early life in St. Augustine and in Longview, Texas, including racism he experienced, learning to navigate a racist world, and working at a drugstore. He also revisits the topics of his first impressions of Portland, working in the shipyards, and beginning his career as a barber. He describes racism he experienced in Portland.

In the third interview session, conducted on March 25, 1994, Maxey talks about a fight between his father and a white police officer in Texas, and how the fallout affected his family. He discusses conditions for black people in Texas, and how they changed during the lead-up to World War II; talks about his experiences working wartime jobs; and describes the development of his political philosophy at the time of the war. He talks about his involvement with the NAACP; discusses people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights; and discusses conditions for black people in Portland after the war. He talks about the social life of the black community, racism they experienced, and the passage of Oregon's various civil rights acts. He also talks about the experiences of black members of the U.S. military during World War II, as well as his involvement in the Oregon Republican Party.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on April 1, 1994, Maxey continues discussing his involvement in the Oregon Republican Party and his involvement in the NAACP, as well as people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights. He also continues discussing his involvement in the NAACP. He discusses the slow progress of civil rights in Oregon; talks about his own activism; and shares his thoughts on interracial marriage. He talks about experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and discusses his experiences with Oregon Republicans such as Tom McCall, Clay Myers, and Sig Unander. He describes how the black community was disproportionately affected by the state's land seizures during the construction of I-5, including his own loss of his home and first two barbershops. He then discusses owning and operating a grocery store as a family business in North Portland, as well as a barbershop and other businesses that he ran on the side. He talks about raising his children, including their education.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on May 3, 1994, Maxey discusses the reasons why many black people left the South for the West. He talks about the types of jobs that were available to black people in Oregon during World War II and the impact of Oliver Smith's campaign for the Oregon Legislature, and he revisits the topic of people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights. He discusses his political views, his disagreements with the national Republican Party, and his reasons for remaining a registered Republican. He then revisits the topic of experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and talks about having dinner with the governor of Utah. He shares his opinion on school integration and busing; talks about racism his children faced in Portland schools; and discusses the importance of historically black universities. He also revisits the topic of working in the shipyards and describes discrimination he experienced there. He describes the subtler forms that racism took in Oregon as opposed to the South. He then talks about his children, their families, and their careers; discusses his upbringing in the African Methodist Episcopal Church; and reflects on his accomplishments.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted on November 18, 1994, Maxey revisits the topic of experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and describes the process through which the convention passed his resolution that the Young Republicans never again hold a convention at any hotel with discriminatory practices.

Maxey, Charles B. (Charles Britton), 1917-2001

William L. Finley photographs, 1901-1940

  • Org. Lot 369
  • Collection
  • 1901 - 1940

Images of wildlife, primarily birds of the western United States, c.1900-1940s, photographed by William Lovell Finley and his associate Herman T. Bohlman, with the help of his wife, Nellie Irene Barnhart Finley and others. The collection includes fine images of adult and immature birds, chicks, eggs, and nests. Many show habitat. Others document the camera equipment and techniques used to make the photographs.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

William L. Finley letters and scrapbook, 1946-1962

  • Mss 2654
  • Collection
  • 1946 - 1962

Collection includes: Scrapbook and letters, 1 vol. and 1 folder, 1946-1962, regarding personal matters, the Izaak Walton League, conservation, etc.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest Oral Histories

  • Mss 2988-SR
  • Collection
  • 2000 - 2013

The Gay and Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN) was established in Portland, Oregon, by Tom Cook in the early 1990s. Since then the organization has collected archival materials and oral histories from organizations and individuals active in lesbian and gay issues in the Portland area and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Many of these oral histories were gathered by Portland State University students, from the late 90s to present.

Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series

  • SR Columbia River Gorge Lecture Series
  • Collection
  • 1981?

A series of lectures given by Gertrude Glutsch Jensen on the importance of preserving the Columbia River Gorge.

Jensen, Gertrude Glutsch, 1903-

The Bo's'n's Whistle

  • BW-OSC
  • Collection
  • 1941 - 1946

The Bo's'n's Whistle was a publication distributed to the employees of the Kaiser Shipyards in Oregon and Washington between 1941 and 1946. The first publication was released on July 18, 1941 under the editorial direction of Chick Johnson, and was given its distinctive name by Edgar Kaiser the General Manager of the shipyard. Subsequent issues released bi-weekly, along with a special issue on September 27, 1941 commemorating the launch of the "Star of Oregon". Distribution expanded to the Vancouver and Swan Island Shipyards in April 1942, with Hal Babbit, director of public relations for Kaiser Company serving as editorial supervisor.

The format of the Bo's'n's Whistle changed from a magazine to a weekly newspaper beginning March 10, 1944, with separate editions for each of the three shipyards - Oregon Shipyard, Swan Island, and Vancouver. On September 7, 1945 The Bo's'n's Whistle was again consolidated into one edition for all three shipyards, and on January 1, 1946 it was moved to a twice-monthly publication schedule. The final issue of The Bo's'n's Whistle was published on May 24, 1946. At its peak, The Bo's'n's Whistle was circulated to 90,000 employees, with over 4,000,000 copies distributed over its lifespan.

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

Oregon Legislature Oral History Series

  • SR Oregon Legislature Oral History Series
  • Collection
  • 1984 - 2011

This set of interviews was primarily done as part of a decade-long project. They are with primarily state officials, including: senators, representatives, secretaries of state, treasurers, and governors, who held office mostly between 1960 and 1998.

Interviewees include: Victor Atiyeh, the first Arab American Governor in the United States; Maurine Neuberger, Oregon’s first and only female state senator; Clay Myers, Oregon Secretary of State and State Treasurer, and a leader in Land-Use planning; and Monroe Sweetland, a native Oregonian who was politically active across the nation.

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