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Oral history interview with Alan Green

  • SR 2824
  • Collection
  • 1999-04-20 - 1999-07-21

This oral history interview with Alan Green was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Green's office and home in Portland, Oregon, from April 20 to July 21, 1999. Tape 16 of the recording is missing, but the contents are reflected in an incomplete transcript of the interview.

In this interview, Green discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his memories of the Depression, his family history of alcoholism, and his early education, including his involvement in student body government during high school. He then discusses his experiences as a theodylite observer in the Army during World War II, including spending time in an Army hospital after a truck accident in New Guinea. He talks about attending Stanford University, including living in the Phi Delta fraternity house, and meeting his wife, Joan Irwin. He describes working an insurance salesman, his marriage, and starting a battery company. He also briefly discusses serving as president of the University Club in 1967 and his efforts to open membership to Jewish people. He talks about a DUI infraction in 1962, his struggle with alcoholism, and his path to sobriety, as well as his later work helping others get sober. He speaks at length about his management of various business enterprises.

Green discusses his involvement in moderate conservative politics and the Republican Party. He talks about his chairmanship of the Multnomah County Central Committee, the 1964 presidential campaign of Barry Goldwater, and Mark Hatfield's brush with the vice presidency in 1968. He also talks about Wayne Morse's defection to the Democratic Party. He speaks at length about his service on the Port of Portland, including competition with Seattle, labor issues, and other members of the commission, particularly Ed Westerdahl. He shares his memories of the Richard Nixon administration, particularly his feelings regarding the Watergate scandal and the rise of the far right. He also talks about serving on the Federal Maritime Commission from 1982 to 1988, including the confirmation process, the Shipping Act of 1985, and his social life while living in Washington, D.C. He talks about how his work on that commission was facilitated by both Mark Hatfield and Bob Packwood. Green then describes serving as chairman for George H.W. Bush's 1988 presidential campaign in Oregon and his subsequent appointment as ambassador to Romania in 1989.

Green speaks at length about serving as ambassador to Romania from 1989 to 1992. He talks about his confirmation, his training, and the fall of Nicolae Ceaușescu. He talks about the members of his staff, living behind the Iron Curtain, and helping Romanian political dissidents become American citizens. He then talks about the new Romanian president, Ion Iliescu, Romanian political parties, and Romanian society and economy after the revolution. He also talks about traveling through Europe while an ambassador, Romania's role in the Gulf War, and international adoption of Romanian children. He then discusses his activities during retirement, including sitting on various boards, and his involvement with the political campaigns of Gordon Smith and George W. Bush. He closes the interview by talking about his children and grandchildren.

Green, Alan, 1925-

Address to Meier and Frank employees

  • SR 294
  • Collection
  • 1949-03-24

Aaron Frank urges assembled employees to resist union organizing effort. He enumerates the benefits provided to employees by Meier & Frank, gives examples of management/employee loyalty, lists responsibilities as director, and makes a plea for an employee vote of confidence.The employees utlimately voted against unionization.

Frank, Aaron

Oral history interview with Tom McCall

  • SR 298
  • Collection
  • 1973-03-12

This oral history interview with Oregon Governor Tom McCall was conducted by Steve Lorton on March 12, 1973, and was one of a number of interviews with governors of Western states on the occasion of Sunset Magazine's 75th anniversary. McCall describes his experiences in government and politics, along with challenges including growth and conservation in Oregon. He mentions members of the Oregon Legislature, including Bob Packwood, Keith Miller, Daniel Evans, Cecil Andrus, and Richard Neuberger. He also discusses legislation that was forthcoming at the time of the interview, including the Oregon Bottle Bill. He closes the interview by discussing his plans for Oregon's future.

McCall, Tom, 1913-1983

Oral history interview with Cherie Hiser, by Jim Morris

  • SR 3125
  • Collection
  • 1981-12-06

Hiser discusses The Center of the Eye in Colorado, photographers she has worked with, photography techniques, portrait photography, her recent photography projects, including portraits of gay men and tattooed people, photography as therapy, studying photography with Minor White, and teaching photography.

Hiser, Cherie

Oral history interview with Emery Neale, by Jim Strassmaier

  • SR 339
  • Collection
  • 1988-02-10 - 1988-02-17

Neale discusses his family history and childhood, playing tennis at the Irvington Club, the history of indoor tennis in Portland, Oregon, discrimination at tennis clubs in the area, playing in tennis tournaments, his tennis career, being in the Army during WWII, and the People to People Tours.

Neale, Emery

Oral history interview with John C. Beatty

  • SR 3716
  • Collection
  • 1999-03

This oral history interview with John C. Beatty was conducted by two unidentified Riverdale High School students as part of series of interviews with Riverdale High School alumni in March 1999. In this interview, Beatty discusses his family background and early life and education at Riverdale High School in the Dunthorpe neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, in the 1920s and 1930s. He also briefly discusses his memories of the Depression and World War II, as well as the changes in the Dunthorpe neighborhood over the 20th century. He closes the interview by talking about his legal career and his experience being drafted during World War II.

Beatty, John Cabeen, 1919-

Oral history interview with Margret D. Thomas

  • SR 3719
  • Collection
  • 1999-03

This oral history interview with Margret D. Thomas was conducted by an unidentified Riverdale High School student as part of the Riverdale School Oral History Series in March 1999. In this interview, Thomas discusses her family. She talks about coming to Portland, Oregon, in 1954, after her marriage to James "Jack" Randolph Thomas in 1942. She discusses Jack Thomas' career as a member of the Riverdale School Board, including the dances he helped to organize for parents. She also talks about life in the Dunthorpe neighborhood of Portland, including her memories of the 1962 Columbus Day storm. Thomas recounts her memories of World War II and the Depression. She then discusses her high school education in Los Angeles County, California, and her involvement with Riverdale School in Portland.

Thomas, Margret D. (Margret Dale), 1922-2011

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

  • SR 3901
  • Collection
  • 1995-02-20

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Alfred Jones on behalf of the Marion County Historical Society in Salem, Oregon. The interview was held at Edwards' home in Salem on February 20, 1995. In this interview, Edwards discusses his family background, his early life and education in Salem, and his service in the National Guard. He also talks about his early involvement with the Oregon Legislature as a secretary, including an anecdote on the fire that destroyed the Capitol building in 1935. Edwards then discusses his activities after becoming chief clerk of the House of Representatives in 1963, and then secretary of the Senate in 1965. He also talks about some of the governors that he served under, as well as Abigail Scott Duniway and woman suffrage. He discusses landmark legislation, including the Bottle Bill; the state archives; and his interest in Arabian horses.

Edwards, Cecil L.

KPTV interview with Jackie Kennedy and John F. Kennedy

  • SR 3904
  • Collection
  • 1958

This interview with John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy was conducted by John A. Salisbury for broadcast on the Portland, Oregon, channel KPTV in 1958. In this interview, Jackie Kennedy discusses their family life and recreational activities. John F. Kennedy talks about Jimmy Hoffa and labor unions. He addresses the controversy surrounding his Catholicism and youth. He discusses his experience meeting Oregonians.

Salisbury closes the interview with thanks to the Kennedys for appearing on his program, a commercial for Ovaltine, and an explanation of the changes in Oregon laws regarding primaries. A commercial for SafeCo Insurance plays, followed by a message regarding Oregon election laws from Oregon Secretary of State Howell Appling and Governor Mark Hatfield. The recording ends with a commercial for an allergy nasal spray.

Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963

Oral history interview with Norma Paulus

  • SR 3972
  • Collection
  • 1999-02-10 - 2000-11-02

This oral history interview with Norma Paulus was conducted by Clark Hansen at Paulus's home in Salem, Oregon, in Lincoln City, Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon; and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from February 10, 1999, to November 2, 2000, and from February 10 to 27, 2010. In the interview, Paulus discusses her family background and early life in Burns, Oregon, including life during World War II and contracting polio at the age of 19. She also discusses working as a secretary for the Harney County district attorney, Leland Beckham; moving to Salem to work for a law firm; working for Judge Earl Latourette; and going to law school. Paulus describes meeting Bill Paulus while attending law school; his family background; and their marriage. Paulus discusses her involvement with the Republican Party; working as an appellate lawyer for the Oregon Supreme Court; working on Wally Carson's campaign for the Oregon Legislature in 1965; and getting her first political appointment, to the Marion County Boundary Commission, where she focused on land-use and city planning issues. She focuses on managing a career in law and politics while raising two young children and building a house.

She then discusses her time in the Oregon House of Representatives, from 1970 to 1976, including environmental issues such as the Bottle Bill of 1971 and recycling; education; the criminal code; taxes; attempts to make Cape Kiwanda a state park; and the Rajneeshees. Paulus goes into detail about the women's caucus and the bills they focused on for women's rights, as well as efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. She describes working with Bob Smith, Paul Hanneman, Betty Roberts, Stafford Hansell, Jack Anunsen, Wally Priestly, Dick Eymann, Lynn Newbry, Glenn Jackson, Jason Boe, and Gretchen Kafoury. She also talks about being co-chair for Clay Myers' 1974 race for Oregon governor.

Paulus goes on to speak about her time as Oregon's first woman secretary of state from 1977 to 1985, including her first campaign in 1976 against Blaine Whipple; her efforts to increase voter turnout; and conducting audits, particularly of the Forestry Department. She also discusses the secretary of state's role as state archivist and the conflict between the Oregon State Archives and the Oregon Historical Society over which records belong with which institution. She also discusses working with Governor Vic Atiyeh. Paulus discusses running for governor against Neil Goldschmidt in 1986 and the challenges her campaign faced. She discusses her position on the Northwest Power Planning Council from 1987 to 1990, including working with Ted Hallock and Bob Duncan. She also discusses her position as Oregon superintendent of public instruction from 1990 to 1999, including her efforts to fund K-12 education. Paulus also relates a story about sharing an airplane with Moshe Dayan.

Paulus, Norma

Interview with Thomas H. Mercer

  • SR 3974
  • Collection
  • 1976

This interview with Thomas Mercer was conducted circa 1976. In the interview, Mercer, who was running against Al Ullman, discusses his current campaign for a seat in the Oregon House of Representatives. He also discusses his heart issues and how they have affected his career; gun control; and health care. In addition to the interview, there is a recording of a question-and-answer session with Mercer and voters during his campaign. In the session, Mercer addresses questions regarding abortion and taxation.

Also on the audiocassettes with the Mercer interview is a speech delivered by an unidentified man circa 1977, regarding his experience in the Oregon Legislature, and a discussion held in Salem, Oregon, also circa 1977. The speakers in the discussion include Robert Marx, Anthony Meeker, Margaret Dereli, Mae Yih, Bill Rutherford, Wally Carson, Ken Jernstedt, Tony Van Vliet, and other unidentified legislators. Topics include municipal-, county-, and state-level taxation; revenue sharing; correctional institutions; SB 100 and land use planning; and energy conservation. It is unknown what, if any, relationship these recordings have to the Mercer interview.

Mercer, Thomas H.

Oral history interview with Constance Beatty, by Rick Harmon

  • SR 4003
  • Collection
  • 1986-02-07

Beatty discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon and Seaview, Washington, her father owning the Golden West Hotel, playing music, and race relations at school in Portland.

Beatty, Constance Allen

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins

  • SR 470
  • Collection
  • 1986-07-07 - 1986-08-01

This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins' office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father's career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice lawsuits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Russell Peyton

  • SR 473
  • Collection
  • 1987-07-28 - 1987-08-12

This interview with Russell Peyton was conducted by Dan Malone at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from July 28 to August 12, 1987. In the interview, Peyton discusses his family history and early life in Virginia. He also discusses his early jobs, including working as an assistant to a Chinese diplomat. He then talks about going to California and working in service stations, where he got involved in a lawsuit against the Shell Oil company. Peyton then discusses attending the University of Oklahoma and confronting his own racism. In talking about the lead-up to World War II, he discusses coming to Oregon and working for the Kaiser shipyards and his impressions of Portland. He then talks about a trip he took to Europe shortly after the end of the war. Peyton discusses his involvement with the Urban League and his work toward integration, particularly on housing discrimination. He also discusses the different forms that racism took in the North and South. He then talks about his work as an investigator for the Civil Rights Division of the Oregon State Bureau of Labor, detailing many of his cases. Peyton discusses his work with the Joint Council on Social Welfare and the legislation they lobbied for. He also discusses the achievements of the Oregon Prison Association; working with Portland General Electric to cease cutting off power to people who couldn't pay their bills in winter; and school busing. Peyton discusses his time as executive director of the Metropolitan Human Relations Commission, including affirmative action policies, working to improve the Portland police, food security, pay equality, and employment discrimination. He also discusses working with the Portland City Council and the Metro government. In addition, he talks briefly about Vietnam War protests in Portland. Peyton talks often about Edwin "Bill" C. Berry of the Urban League, as well as other leaders in Portland's black community. He then briefly describes each winner of the Russell Peyton Award from its inception to 1987. Peyton also talks about the numerous humanitarian organizations whose boards he served on after retirement. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments in civil rights.

Peyton, Russell A. (Russell Ackerman), 1903-1996

Oral history interview with Marjorie McDonald, by Edna Kovacs

  • SR 6502
  • Collection
  • 1989-10-21

McDonald discusses her family background and early life in Indiana and Portland, Oregon, her poetry, learning and teaching Russian, living in London for a year,and her collage artwork.

McDonald, Marjorie

Oral history interview with John R. Leach, by Jean Whitford

  • SR 758
  • Collection
  • 1968-02-22 - 1968-02-23

Leach discusses his wife, Lilla Leach, and tells stories from his recently published autobiography Oxbows and Bare Feet including his remembrances of Sam Warfield, "Uncle Sam", Indian Scout Lorenzo Chapman, Joe Meeks, and others in the Lexington, Oregon area. He also discusses the history of the Leach family, their journey west to Oregon, frontier life, folk medicine, his childhood and early life in Eastern Oregon, and his adventures with his wife, Lilla Leach.

Leach, John Roy, 1882-1972

Oral history interview with Wayne Morse

  • SR 779
  • Collection
  • 1967

This interview with Wayne Morse was conducted by William Plymat for the World Peace Broadcasting Foundation in November 1967. The interview was originally distributed on a disposable plastic 33.3 rpm disc as a thank-you for a donation to the World Peace Broadcasting Foundation of "a dollar or more." In the interview, Morse discusses his opposition to the war in Vietnam.

Morse, Wayne L. (Wayne Lyman), 1900-1974

Oral history interview with William Francis Lambert

  • SR 81
  • Collection
  • 1980-07-14

In the interview, he discusses his family history, childhood in Portland, YMCA Spirit Lake Boy's Camp (1913 - 1916) working in timber and railroad industries etc.

Lambert, William Francis

Oral history interview with Mark Bocek, by Jim Strassmaier

  • SR 813
  • Collection
  • 1979-04-21

Bocek talks about his early life in Poland, moving to the United States, learning English, working in a cotton mill, joining the army, going to the Philippines with the US Army in 1909, playing the clarinet, returning to the United States, settling in the Pacific Northwest, Kaiser Shipyards, and his life living in Portland, Oregon.

Bocek, Mark

Oral history interview with Harold Pubols, by Louise Pubols

  • SR 823
  • Collection
  • 1988-01-10 - 1988-01-22

Pubols discusses his family background, parents, siblings, Russian heritage, immigration to United States, early life working on a farm in Eastern Oregon, educational history etc.

Pubols, Harold

Oral history interview with Stafford Hansell

  • SR 88
  • Collection
  • 1983 October 17 - 1986 June

This oral history interview with Stafford Hansell was conducted by Barbara Reynolds from October 17 to November 15, 1983, and in June 1986. In the interview, Hansell discusses his family history and early life on a farm in Umatilla County, Oregon, including having diphtheria and polio as a child and the long-term effects on his health. He also talks about his education at the University of Montana and Whitman College, including his involvement in athletics and drama. Hansell talks about the early years of his marriage to Mary Elizabeth Ennis; making ends meet during the Depression; farming with his father; hog farming with his brother, Bill; and adopting his son, John. He also discusses serving on his local school board from 1953 to 1957, including implementing kindergarten and increasing school funding. Hansell then discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and representing Umatilla County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation on land-use planning, taxation, labor, reapportionment, education, agriculture, and marijuana. He also discusses his failed bid to become Speaker of the House in the 1967 session, as well as many of the representatives he served with. Hansell also discusses his role on the Ways and Means Committee; the Boeing Space Age Park and Boardman; salary increases for legislators; and the Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall administrations. He speaks briefly on his feelings regarding the impeachment of President Richard Nixon. He also talks about working for the administrations of Governors Bob Straub and Norma Paulus after leaving the Legislature, including serving on the Oregon Liquor Commission, the State Board of Education, and the Governor's Taskforce on Land Use Planning. He also discusses the Rajneeshees. Hansell closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family, as well as his involvement with the Oregon Historical Society and his interest in Native American cultures and art.

Hansell, Stafford (Marion Stafford), 1913-1995

Oral history interview with Sister John Mary Lane, by Roberta Watts

  • SR 9012
  • Collection
  • 1978-04-17 - 1978-06-06

Sister John Mary Lane discusses her family background and early life, getting involved with the Sisters of the Holy Names, women in the Catholic church and feminism, teaching, life in a convent, and teaching at Marylhurst College.

Lane, John Mary, Sister

Oral history interview with Dr. Jessie Laird Brodie, by Roberta Watts

  • SR 9027
  • Collection
  • 1978-02-14 - 1978-03-30

Dr. Brodie discusses this history of laws regarding birth control, women's rights, practicing medicine, her involvement with the United Nations, Pan-American Women's Medical Association, Planned Parenthood, and other organizations, family planning in Latin America, particularly in Haiti, her involvement with the White House Council on Aging, Sickle-Cell Anemia, working in Cambodia, and her own family.

Brodie, Jessie Laird, 1898-1990

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