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Oral history interview with Chester E. McCarty

  • SR 1222
  • Collection
  • 1985-11-12 - 1987-09-01

This interview with Chester E. McCarty was conducted by Bill Koen in Portland, Oregon, on November 12, 1985, and by Jim Strassmaier at McCarty's office in Portland from August 4 to September 1, 1987. In this interview, McCarty discusses his family background and early life in Stage Gulch and Portland, Oregon, including working on the family farm during summers, his memories of World War I, and his education in Portland. He talks about selling advertisement space for the Oregonian newspaper while attending the Northwestern College of Law, and about his marriage to Julia Caroline Gromoff. He speaks at length about serving in the National Guard, beginning at age 15, and in the U.S. Army field artillery branch.

He discusses serving as assistant attorney general of Oregon from 1930 to 1936, including representing the Game Commission and the state police. He also discusses working as a lawyer in private practice, where he focused on aviation law. He talks about being a commercial pilot on the side, and relates several anecdotes about emergency landings. He also discusses serving in the state Senate in 1942, including his friendship with Dorothy McCullough Lee, as well as resigning shortly after his election to serve in World War II.

He speaks at length about his service in the U.S. Army Air Corps training pilots, and later commanding troops in the Middle East. He also talks about the activities of his wife, Julia Caroline Gromoff, during World War II. He then talks about returning to civilian life after the war and continuing his law practice in Portland, where he acted as defense counsel in numerous courts-martial. He talks about some of the judges he argued before, including Gus Solomon and James Alger Fee. He also discusses continuing to fly planes, as well as his service on the Port of Portland Commission. He discusses accepting the command of the Oregon Army Reserves, getting activated for the Korean War, and his continued service in the Air Force until his retirement in 1966. He closes the interview by discussing serving with Glenn Jackson in North Africa during World War II.

McCarty, Chester E. (Chester Earl), 1905-1999

Oral history interview with Russell Peyton

  • SR 473
  • Collection
  • 1987-07-28 - 1987-08-12

This interview with Russell Peyton was conducted by Dan Malone at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from July 28 to August 12, 1987. In the interview, Peyton discusses his family history and early life in Virginia. He also discusses his early jobs, including working as an assistant to a Chinese diplomat. He then talks about going to California and working in service stations, where he got involved in a lawsuit against the Shell Oil company. Peyton then discusses attending the University of Oklahoma and confronting his own racism. In talking about the lead-up to World War II, he discusses coming to Oregon and working for the Kaiser shipyards and his impressions of Portland. He then talks about a trip he took to Europe shortly after the end of the war. Peyton discusses his involvement with the Urban League and his work toward integration, particularly on housing discrimination. He also discusses the different forms that racism took in the North and South. He then talks about his work as an investigator for the Civil Rights Division of the Oregon State Bureau of Labor, detailing many of his cases. Peyton discusses his work with the Joint Council on Social Welfare and the legislation they lobbied for. He also discusses the achievements of the Oregon Prison Association; working with Portland General Electric to cease cutting off power to people who couldn't pay their bills in winter; and school busing. Peyton discusses his time as executive director of the Metropolitan Human Relations Commission, including affirmative action policies, working to improve the Portland police, food security, pay equality, and employment discrimination. He also discusses working with the Portland City Council and the Metro government. In addition, he talks briefly about Vietnam War protests in Portland. Peyton talks often about Edwin "Bill" C. Berry of the Urban League, as well as other leaders in Portland's black community. He then briefly describes each winner of the Russell Peyton Award from its inception to 1987. Peyton also talks about the numerous humanitarian organizations whose boards he served on after retirement. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments in civil rights.

Peyton, Russell A. (Russell Ackerman), 1903-1996

Oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti

  • SR 1074
  • Collection
  • 1987-03-26 - 1987-04-30

This oral history interview with Margaret Thiele Petti was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, Oregon, from March 26 to April 30, 1987, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on March 26, 1987, Petti discusses her family background and early life in Vernonia, Oregon, including her family's history in the hotel business, her education, and her experience during the Depression. She talks about living and working in Portland during the Depression and describes how she came to work for Henry Thiele. She discusses her relationship with and marriage to Henry Thiele. She also talks about participating in illegal gambling and going to speakeasies in the 1930s.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 2, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her early life in Vernonia, including her family's history in the hotel business and taking piano lessons. She then continues discussing her marriage to Henry Thiele, and speaks at length about Thiele's life and career. She talks about managing the Henry Thiele Restaurant in Portland, about serving alcohol after 1952, and about catering for the Kaiser shipyards during World War II. She discusses the menu at the Henry Thiele Restaurant, and talks about working with food suppliers. She then looks at photographs and talks about them.

In the third interview session, conducted on April 9, 1987, Petti revisits the topic of her marriage to Henry Thiele and talks about their home in Lake Oswego. She talks about Henry Thiele's involvement with Christian Science. She also revisits the topic of managing Henry Thiele Restaurant, and discusses serving alcohol, talks about managing her staff, and shares the history of the restaurant. She shares her opinions on national politics. She describes a failed deal to sell the restaurant in 1986.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 30, 1987, Petti continues to discuss managing Henry Thiele Restaurant and talks about the restaurant's clientele. She also talks about her social life at the time of the interview in 1987. She then discusses her marriage to August Petti. She talks about her plans for the future and about traveling with August Petti. The interview closes with Petti looking at photographs and talking about them.

Petti, Margaret Thiele, 1916-2001

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins

  • SR 470
  • Collection
  • 1986-07-07 - 1986-08-01

This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins' office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father's career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice lawsuits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Stafford Hansell

  • SR 88
  • Collection
  • 1983 October 17 - 1986 June

This oral history interview with Stafford Hansell was conducted by Barbara Reynolds from October 17 to November 15, 1983, and in June 1986. In the interview, Hansell discusses his family history and early life on a farm in Umatilla County, Oregon, including having diphtheria and polio as a child and the long-term effects on his health. He also talks about his education at the University of Montana and Whitman College, including his involvement in athletics and drama. Hansell talks about the early years of his marriage to Mary Elizabeth Ennis; making ends meet during the Depression; farming with his father; hog farming with his brother, Bill; and adopting his son, John. He also discusses serving on his local school board from 1953 to 1957, including implementing kindergarten and increasing school funding. Hansell then discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and representing Umatilla County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation on land-use planning, taxation, labor, reapportionment, education, agriculture, and marijuana. He also discusses his failed bid to become Speaker of the House in the 1967 session, as well as many of the representatives he served with. Hansell also discusses his role on the Ways and Means Committee; the Boeing Space Age Park and Boardman; salary increases for legislators; and the Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall administrations. He speaks briefly on his feelings regarding the impeachment of President Richard Nixon. He also talks about working for the administrations of Governors Bob Straub and Norma Paulus after leaving the Legislature, including serving on the Oregon Liquor Commission, the State Board of Education, and the Governor's Taskforce on Land Use Planning. He also discusses the Rajneeshees. Hansell closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family, as well as his involvement with the Oregon Historical Society and his interest in Native American cultures and art.

Hansell, Stafford (Marion Stafford), 1913-1995

Oral history interview with Constance Beaty

  • SR 4003
  • Collection
  • 1986-02-07 - 1986-02-07

This oral history interview with Constance Beaty was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, on February 7, 1986. In this interview, Beaty discusses her family background, her early life in Portland, and her childhood vacations in Seaview, Washington. She talks about the Golden West Hotel, which the first hotel in Portland to accommodate black people and was owned by her father, William Duncan Allen. She describes the interior furnishing of the hotel and talks about the clientele the hotel catered to. She discusses playing piano and organ; talks about her recreational and social activities as part of Portland's black community; and discusses her education in Portland. She closes the interview by talking about racial discrimination she experienced, and the impact her mother's death in 1924 had on her family.

Beaty, Constance (Nellie Constance), 1910-1996

J.H. Horner Papers, 1889-1985

  • Mss 6031
  • Collection
  • 1889 - 1985

The collection consists principally of the typescript (with corrections in hand) of Horner's work, Wallowa River and Valley, dealing with regional history, as well as the Nez Percé Indians. Other papers include correspondence (ca. 1889-1985); legal documents (1898-1931); patents for window construction (1921-1922); and manuscript materials (undated). Horner's main correspondent is Otis Halfmoon, a Catholic Nez Percé who assisted with the author's manuscript. The collection also includes a list of other contributors that assisted Horner in his research

Horner, J. H., 1870-1953

Oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow

  • SR 1071
  • Collection
  • 1985-08-22 - 1985-09-26

This oral history interview with Margaret L. Furrow was conducted by Bill Koen at Furrow's home near Odell, Oregon, from August 22 to September 26, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 22, 1985, Furrow discusses her family background, particularly regarding her grandfather, Peter Mohr, who owned the first commercial orchard in Hood River, Oregon. She describes daily life on the family orchard and dairy farm in Hood River. She talks about working as a fruit packer for Nakamura Orchards.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 26, 1985, Furrow shares her observations of the treatment of the Japanese community in Hood River during World War II, and describes racial discrimination in Hood River. She revisits the topic of daily life on her family's orchard and dairy farm in Hood River, and talks about the gendered division of labor. She describes her work picking and packing fruit for Nakamura Orchards. She talks about the ranch she ran with her husband, William Henry Furrow, and discusses selling their fruit through Diamond Fruit Growers Inc. She discusses the future of small farms in Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her involvement in the Hood River County Historical Society.

Furrow, Margaret L. (Margaret Lucille), 1913-2001

Conversations with Waverley Country Club golf caddies

  • SR 89
  • Collection
  • 1985-08-07

These conversations with golf caddies at the Waverley Country Club in Portland, Oregon, were conducted by C. Edwin Francis on August 7, 1985, for his book "Waverley Country Club, 1896-1987." The caddies who were interviewed included Tony Roberts, Neil Peer, Charles Reimer, Bob McKendrick, Warren Munro, Greg Millett, and Iver Unis. In these conversations, they share stories about their experiences as golf caddies at Waverley Country Club.

Francis, C. Edwin

Oral history interview with Maggie St. James

  • SR 4500
  • Collection
  • 1985-06-26

This oral history interview with Maggie St. James was conducted by Jann Mitchell on June 26, 1985. In this interview, St. James discusses her mother, Dr. Ruth Barnett, and her mother's work as an abortion provider in Portland in the early 20th century. She describes Barnett's skill as a doctor, her personality, and how she and her mother were treated by society and the press. She talks about Barnett's multiple arrests, and about Barnett's relationship with Portland government and police. St. James also discusses the rise of anti-choice rhetoric at the time of the interview in 1985. She talks about her relationship with her mother, her marriages and divorces, and her experience as an abortion patient. She also discusses her life after her mother's death. She closes the interview by speaking more about Barnett's work as an abortion provider; talking about her children; and revisiting the topic of the rise of anti-choice rhetoric at the time of the interview in 1985.

St. James, Margaret L., 1915-2009

Oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider

  • SR 1075
  • Collection
  • 1985-04-18 - 1985-04-25

This oral history interview with Nicholas Schneider and Edmund Schneider was conducted by Rick Harmon at the Schneiders' home in Portland, Oregon, from April 18-25, 1985. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 18, 1985, the Schneider brothers discuss their family history and early life in Portland. They speak at length about their first family home in Southeast Portland and they describe the appliances and utilities the house had in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They then describe the family home that they moved to in 1910. They also talk about the jobs they held, their education, and their recreational activities. They share their memories of Oaks Amusement Park, of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, and of the early Portland Rose Festival parades.

In the second interview session, conducted on April 25, 1985, the Schneider brothers continue to discuss their early life in Portland, including their recreational activities, their involvement with the Catholic Church, and their education. They also talk about their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company. They then discuss their experiences serving in the U.S. Army during World War I. Nicholas Schneider also talks about experiencing anti-German and anti-Catholic discrimination. They close the interview by revisiting the topic of their father's involvement with the Albers Brothers Milling Company.

Schneider, Nicholas, 1892-1989

Oral history interview with Clyde Rice

  • SR 1054
  • Collection
  • 1985-01-22 - 1985-03-13

This oral history interview with Clyde Rice was conducted by Rick Harmon at Rice's home in Clackamas, Oregon, from January 22 to March 13, 1985. The interview was conducted in seven sessions. The audio on tapes 3, 4, 6, and 13 is affected by speed issues.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 22, 1985, Rice discusses his family background, particularly his father's flavor extract business. He talks about his early life in Portland and Salem, including his family's Christian Science faith, his social life, and his relationship with his family.

In the second interview session, conducted on January 29, 1985, Rice continues discussing his early life in Portland and Salem, including his family's Christian Science faith. He tells several anecdotes about his early school life; describes racism he observed; and shares his memories of World War I.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 7, 1985, Rice discusses his involvement with the Portland Art Museum School (now known as the Pacific Northwest College of Art), including the professors and curators. He talks about the artistic community in Portland and discusses his own art. He revisits the topic of racism that he observed and Portland politics in the early 20th century.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 14, 1985, Rice continues discussing Portland politics in the early 20th century. He then talks about homesteading in Clackamas County during the 1930s and describes clearing the land, hunting, and farming. He discusses returning to Portland a few years later and working for his father's flavor extract business. He talks about his marriage to Marguerite Evelyn "Nordi" Nordstrom, and about meeting his second wife, Virginia Lee Broms.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on February 21, 1985, Rice describes building a rammed earth house in the Mt. Scott neighborhood of Portland during the late 1930s. He speaks at length about his affair with Virginia Lee Broms. He also revisits the topic of working for his father's flavor extract business. He talks about spending time in Alaska before his divorce from Nordi Rice, his marriage to Virginia Lee Broms, and how both events affected his son.

In the seventh and final interview session, conducted on March 13, 1985, Rice continues discussing his development as an author. He describes the years-long process of writing and publishing his first novel, "A Heaven in the Eye." He also talks about plans to publish his other writings.

Rice, Clyde, 1903-1998

Oral history interview with Elise F. Wendel

  • SR 1004
  • Collection
  • 1985-01-30 - 1985-02-27

This oral history interview with Elise F. Wendel was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, from January 30 to February 27, 1985. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on January 30, 1985, Wendel discusses her family background and early life in Southwest Portland, in the area that later became the Park Blocks. She talks about the people in her neighborhood and how the neighborhood changed during the time she lived there. She describes her childhood home at length. She talks about her experience growing up as a Jewish person in Portland, her recreational activities, and a family trip to Europe just before the outbreak of World War I. She also briefly shares her memories of civilian life during World War I and of the 1918 flu epidemic. She discusses her education, including attending Catlin Gabel School and studying in Paris, France.

In the second interview session, conducted on February 6, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her education, including attending Catlin Gabel School and studying in Paris, France, and attending a finishing school in New York. She talks about her father, I.N. Fleischner, and his department store, Fleischner, Mayer & Co. She then talks about her experiences at Wellesley College. She speaks about her marriage to Harold Fox Wendel and talks about his early life.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 13, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her marriage to Harold F. Wendel and his early life. She talks about Harold F. Wendel's career as president of the Lipman & Wolfe department store, including competition with Meier & Frank, changes he made to the business, and his management of his employees. She compares the managerial styles of I.N. Fleischner and Harold F. Wendel; talks about how the Depression affected Lipman & Wolfe; and discusses Harold F. Wendel's involvement with the Oregon State Sanitary Authority and other civic organizations.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on February 20, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her marriage to Harold F. Wendel, including the house they lived in and raising a family. She talks about her involvement with the Council of Jewish Women, the Temple Beth Israel Sisterhood, and the League of Women Voters. She also briefly discusses her involvement in civil defense activities during World War II. She speaks at length about her involvement with the Girl Scouts, including securing property for a summer camp.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on February 27, 1985, Wendel continues discussing her involvement with the Girl Scouts, discusses some of the events she helped organize for the group, and talks about some of the ways the organization has changed. She closes the interview by discussing her other volunteer activities.

Wendel, Elise F. (Elise Fleischner), 1905-1986

Oral history interview with Bertha Holt

  • SR 1059
  • Collection
  • 1984

This oral history interview with Bertha Holt was conducted by an unidentified interviewer circa 1984. The interviewer's questions have been edited out.

In this interview, Holt discusses her early life and marriage to Harry Holt. She speaks at length about adopting children from South Korea and founding Holt International Children's Services with Harry Holt. She talks about the death of Harry Holt. She describes her passion for her work facilitating intercounty adoption from South Korea.

The audio recording ends with a 1961 audio letter that Harry Holt sent to Martha Sue, one of the children whose adoption he helped to arrange. In the audio letter, Holt talks about his work helping orphaned children in Seoul, South Korea, and tells the story of Martha Sue's adoption process.

Holt, Bertha

Oral history interview with Charles F. Luce

  • SR 1571
  • Collection
  • 1984-09-07 - 1984-11-20

This oral history interview with Charles F. Luce was conducted by Gene Tolefson from September 7 to November 20, 1984. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on September 7, 1984, Luce briefly discusses his early life in Platteville, Wisconsin, his college experience at Yale law school, and clerking for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black. He talks about his desire to move to the Pacific Northwest and about lobbying for a job with the U.S. Interior Department, which led to his career at the Bonneville Power Administration beginning in 1944. He discusses his role as legal counsel for the BPA, initiatives relating to public utility districts, and helping PUDs get set up. He talks about his appointment as Bonneville Power Administrator in 1961 and describes his new duties. He discusses controversies surrounding the Hanford Nuclear Power Plant; forming treaties with Californian and Canadian power companies; and building dams. He talks about the benefits and drawbacks of hydroelectric power, and his involvement in the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) project.

Between the two sessions is an incomplete segment from a panel discussion regarding the Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada. The discussion, held circa 1990, is moderated by Gordon Gulp, with an introductory speech by Charles F. Luce.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 20, 1984, Luce discusses the Columbia River Treaty, including his own role as a negotiator, the terms of the treaty, and other members of the negotiating team. He talks about attempts to sell surplus power to California and Idaho, opposition to the Columbia River Treaty, and the long term benefits of the treaty. He closes the interview by talking about the early plans for Bonneville that he helped put together when he first began working at BPA in 1944.

Luce, Charles F. (Charles Franklin), 1917-2008

Oral history interview with Rudolph Luscher

  • SR 1038
  • Collection
  • 1984-08-16

This oral history interview with Rudolph Luscher was conducted by Susan G. Tissot at Luscher's home in West Linn, Oregon, on August 16, 1984. Bill Tegart and another unidentified person were also present and often contributed to the interview. At the time of the interview, Tissot's name was Susan Gaughan.

In this interview, Luscher discusses his family background and early life in Fairview. He speaks at length about running a dairy farm in Lake Oswego, including technology for milking cows, feeding his cattle, and changes in the dairy business over the 20th century. He briefly revisits the topic of his early life in Fairview, including his education. He then returns to talking about running a dairy farm in Lake Oswego, including the finances of dairying.

Luscher, Rudolph, 1901-1997

Oral history interview with Connie McCready

  • SR 9046
  • Collection
  • 1981-04-01 - 1984-06-17

This oral history interview with Connie McCready was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Portland, Oregon, from April 1 to June 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, McCready discusses her family background and early life in Pendleton and Portland, Oregon. She focuses particularly on her father, Edgar Averill, and his career as a reporter for the East Oregonian and later as state game warden. She talks about studying journalism at the University of Oregon, including working on the student newspaper, the Daily Emerald. She also discusses other newspapers she worked for after college, including the Coos Bay Times, now The World, and the Oregonian. She talks about meeting Albert McCready, a reporter for the Oregonian, and their subsequent marriage. She also describes some of her other colleagues at the Oregonian; the Oregonian strike of 1959 to 1965; and the merger of the Oregonian and Oregon Journal.

McCready discusses her entry into Portland politics as a result of her father's failing health. She talks about serving on the Citizens School Committee for Portland Public Schools, which was a body that sought to recruit candidates for the school board; serving as precinct committeewoman for the Oregon Republican Party; and her involvement with the League of Women Voters. She describes her successful 1966 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and some of the legislation she worked on during her single term in the Legislature, including on fish conservation, littering, and the creation of Tri-Met. She also talks about working with Representative Betty Roberts on legislation concerning fair employment practices and abortion. She discusses her experiences as one of only four women in the Legislature. She then discusses her appointment to the Portland City Council, and subsequent resignation from the Legislature, in 1970, as well as her re-election campaign later that year. She discusses working with Portland mayors Terry Schrunk and Neil Goldschmidt; her committee assignments; and her fellow city commissioners. McCready talks about serving as Portland mayor from 1979 to 1980, including her accomplishments, as well as her support for controversial issues such as fluoridation, women's rights and gay rights. She speaks at length about her unsuccessful re-election campaign in 1980. She closes the interview by discussing the difficulty of balancing political and personal life.

McCready, Connie (Constance), 1921-2000

Pittock Mansion remembered

  • SR 9319
  • Collection
  • 1983-08-15 - 1984-03-26

A series of interviews conducted by Linda Brody regarding Pittock Mansions.

Tape 1: Marjorie Wright discusses her time living in the gatehouse of Pittock Mansion with her parents from 1920 to 1945, including the work her father did as head gardener.

Tape 2: Betty L. Meier discusses her childhood as a granddaughter of Henry L. Pittock and her memories of visiting Pittock Mansion.

Tape 3 and 4: Louise Barry discusses her relationship to the Pittock family and her memories of Pittock Mansion.

Tape 5: Robert "Peter" Gantenbein discusses the Pittock family and living in the Pittock Mansion. Eric Ladd is also present.

Tape 6: Allyn Staley discusses the restoration of the Pittock Mansion in the 1960s.

Tape 7: Alexander Bolton Pierce discusses the political process involved in the purchase of the Pittock Mansion by the City of Portland and its restoration in the 1960s.

Wright, Marjorie, 1920-2012

Oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon

  • SR 1
  • Collection
  • 1983-03-16

This oral history interview with Wendell H. Harmon and Florence E. Harmon was conducted by Elizabeth Buehler at the Harmon home in Beavercreek, Oregon, on March 16, 1983. In this interview, the Harmons discuss their experience of graduating from Iowa State College, now Iowa State University, in the midst of the Depression with no job prospects in Iowa. Wendell H. Harmon describes choosing to leave Iowa for a homestead near Elk City, Oregon, in 1933. He talks about farming the land on the homestead, and Florence E. Harmon talks about their neighbors. She also talks about her experience being fired from her teaching job as a result of her marriage to Wendell H. Harmon. They discuss their experience setting up their homestead, including building and furnishing a house, preparing the land, and raising livestock. They talk about maintaining the homestead after Wendell H. Harmon accepted a forestry job in 1935 that involved work primarily outside Oregon, and about the process of acquiring the deed to the land. They close the interview by discussing tree farming, as well as the sale of their homestead.

Harmon, Wendell H. (Wendell Harold), 1910-1999

Oral history interview with Paul T. Gillette

  • SR 822
  • Collection
  • 1983-02-09

This oral history interview with Paul T. Gillette was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on February 9, 1983. An unidentified woman was also present and occasionally contributed interview questions.

In this interview, Gillette discusses his family background and early life in Ellston, Iowa, including life on his grandparents' farm. He talks about teaching high school in South Dakota and shares his memories of the Depression. He discusses his marriage to Jennie Maude Maule, his association with football player Frank Leahy, and working for the Kresge Company, which later became Kmart, in Buffalo, New York. He reflects on the places he lived and shows photographs to the interviewers, while discussing the effects of aging on his appearance and health. He then revisits the topic of his family background and early life in Ellston, Iowa. He talks about his religious affiliation, coaching basketball at a school in South Dakota, and attending the University of South Dakota. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of working for the Kresge Company.

Gillette, Paul T. (Paul Traverse), 1902-1992

Joel Palmer Papers, 1783-1982

  • Mss 114
  • Collection
  • 1783-1982

The papers consist of four groups of materials acquired by the Oregon Historical Society at various times. The first group, designated Mss 114, consists of correspondence (1848-1869) concerning the conduct of Indian affairs in Oregon, enlistment of a state militia, and efforts to establish a Union League Council. Correspondents include Benjamin Alvord, Jesse Applegate, Benjamin Bonneville, Samuel Culver, Addison C. Gibbs, and Joseph Lane. Also included is a diary (1857) kept by Palmer while on a voyage from Oregon City to Washington, D.C. via Panama; typescript copies of diaries (1854, 1856, 1860-1861) recording his travels throughout the Pacific Northwest; hand written copy of an agreement (1854) between the United States, represented by superintendent of Indian Affairs, Joel Palmer, and the Calipooia Indian tribe; and articles of incorporation (1862) of the Columbia River Railroad Company.

The second group of materials, designated Mss 114-1, consists of letters sent to Sarah Ann Palmer from various relatives, and receipts and other ephemera of Joel Palmer. Among these are hand written copies of poems dated 1783, possibly from one of Palmer's ancestors.

The third group within the collection, designated Mss 114-2, contains mostly biographical information about Palmer, along with letters written by his descendants and letters relating to the dedication of a statue of Palmer in 1971.

A fourth group of papers, designated Mss 114-3, consists of general correspondence, primarily political and military in nature, legal papers, and a survey of an unidentified Indian reservation.

The final group of materials, designated Mss 114-4, includes a manuscript poem, Bristol, England, 1784; letters from Palmer to General Joseph Lane and others; manuscript copy of report to the U.S. Secretary of War or the Commissioner of Indian Affairs from General Joseph Lane, ca. 1849; a letter from W. B. Bonney to Joel Palmer, 1850 Jan. 17; letter to Joel Palmer from Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Bonneville, 1855 Mar. 27; printed copy of the treaty between the United States and the Rogue River Indians, 1855; manuscript extracts from "Articles of treatry made at Port Orford," 1857 Sept. 20; hand drawn map of the Columbia River and its tributaries, undated; and a pamphlet titled "History of the Grand Ronde Military Block House," 1911.

Palmer, Joel, 1810-1881

Oral history interview with Omar C. Palmer

  • SR 70
  • Collection
  • 1982-12-06

This oral history interview with Omar C. Palmer was conducted by Terence O'Donnell on December 6, 1982. The interview was conducted as research for O'Donnell's book "An Arrow in the Earth: General Joel Palmer and the Indians of Oregon."

In this interview, Palmer discusses his ancestor Joel Palmer, who served as superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Oregon Territory from 1853 to 1856. He reads from family documents, letters, and newspaper articles regarding Joel Palmer's life and career and talks about treaties with Native Americans that Joel Palmer helped to negotiate. He discusses the Native American reservation system, and Joel Palmer's role in its formation. He talks about Palmer family history, particularly the overland journey of Joel Palmer to Oregon on the Barlow Road in 1847. He also briefly discusses his own early life in eastern Washington and southern Idaho.

Palmer, Omar C. (Omar Clyde), 1908-2003

Oral history interview with Richard Sundeleaf

  • SR 9311
  • Collection
  • 1982-11-02 - 1982-11-23

This oral history interview with Richard Sundeleaf was conducted by Linda Dodds and Alfred Staehli at Sundeleaf's home in Portland, Oregon, from November 2-23, 1982. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 2, 1982, Sundeleaf discusses his family background and early life in the Sellwood neighborhood of Portland, including his education, involvement in sports, and early jobs, particularly in sawmills and shipyards. He talks about his experience studying architecture at the Oregon Agricultural College, now Oregon State University, including some of his professors and his involvement in college sports. He describes working as a draftsman for A.E. Doyle and for the architectural firm of Sutton and Whitney. He then talks about starting his own architectural firm and his first jobs designing the swimming pools at the Jantzen Beach Amusement Park and the office building for Jantzen Knitting Mills.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 4, 1982, Sundeleaf continues to discuss designing the swimming pools at Jantzen Beach, while looking at photographs of the amusement park. He talks about other Oregonian architects, architecture-adjacent artisans he worked with, and designing prefabricated houses. He discusses running his own architectural firm, including working with clients, the types of buildings he designed, and his experience during the Depression. He speaks at length about his involvement with the Historic American Buildings Survey.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on November 23, 1982, Sundeleaf continues discussing his involvement with the Historic American Buildings Survey and describing some of the buildings he surveyed. He also talks about the organizational structure of the survey in Oregon. He then revisits the topic of running his own architectural firm and some of the buildings he designed. He shares his thoughts about modern architecture and talks about the buildings in downtown Portland. He closes the interview by discussing designing war housing during World War II.

Sundeleaf, Richard, 1900-1987

Oral history interview with Howard Hobson

  • SR 9354
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-28 - 1982-07-02

This oral history interview with Howard Hobson was conducted by Linda S. Dodds from June 28 to July 2, 1982, at Hobson's home in Portland, Oregon. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Hobson discusses his early life in Portland, including his interest in athletics. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, particularly his involvement in college sports. He discusses studying at Columbia University in New York, New York, including his social life, playing local sports, and returning to Portland. He speaks at length about his career as a college football, baseball and basketball coach, particularly at the University of Oregon. He also briefly talks about his reasons for leaving Oregon to coach at Yale University, his work on the Olympic committee, and working for Ronald Press Publishing Company in New York. He closes the interview by discussing changes in the game of basketball, his writing projects, and awards he has received.

Hobson, Howard, 1903-

Oral history interview with Carl Hillmer Francis

  • SR 9437
  • Collection
  • 1982-06-02

This oral history interview with Carl Hillmer Francis was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Dayton, Oregon, on June 2, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Francis discusses his family background and early life in Woodburn, Oregon, including his early education and childhood activities. He then talks about studying law at Willamette University and Northwestern College of Law, practicing law in Dayton, and serving as Dayton's mayor from 1941 to 1942. He also discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and Young Republicans.

Francis speaks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1943 to 1954, and in the Oregon Senate from 1955 to 1962. He describes some of his fellow legislators, working with lobbyists, and his decision to retire from the Legislature. He speaks about his interest in history and shares tales of some of his favorite historical figures. He closes the interview by talking about Dr. Lewis Alderman.

Francis, Carl Hillmer, 1915-1995

Oral history interview with Vera Katz

  • SR 9044
  • Collection
  • 1982-04-28 - 1982-05-19

This oral history interview with Vera Katz was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at Katz's home in Portland, Oregon, from April 28 to May 19, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 28, 1982, Katz discusses her family's immigration to the United States from Nazi Germany in 1940. She talks about her early life in New York City, including her education and learning English. She then discusses her experience studying sociology and psychology at Brooklyn College; talks about her interest in modern dance and studying under Martha Graham; and speaks about her marriage to Mel Katz. She also briefly talks about working in marketing while in New York. She then discusses relocating to Portland, Oregon, in 1964, in order to support Mel Katz's career, and describes her early impressions of Portland. She talks about the beginnings of her political career working for Robert F. Kennedy's 1968 presidential campaign. She discusses lobbying the Legislature with the Kennedy Action Corps and how that led to her ultimately running to represent Multnomah County in the Oregon Legislature in 1972. She talks about her campaign, legislation she worked on, and her involvement with the Women's Caucus. She also talks about balancing her home life in Portland with her role as a legislator in Salem.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 19, 1982, Katz continues discussing representing Multnomah County in the Oregon Legislature from 1973 to the time of the interview in 1982. She continues talking about legislation she worked on, and discusses working with lobbyists and her fellow legislators. She talks about representing and connecting with her constituency, her role in Democratic party leadership in the Legislature, and her committee assignments. She discusses her experience as a woman legislator; describes her political philosophy; and speaks about serving on the Ways and Means committee. She closes the interview by discussing her plans for the future.

Katz, Vera, 1933-2017

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

  • SR 9431
  • Collection
  • 1982-05-14

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on May 14, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Edwards discusses his duties regarding the selection of horses as a civilian agent for the Remount Service during World War II. He talks about the history of the American Remount Service and how the horses were used during both war and peacetime. He also discusses his duties selecting dogs for military use. He then talks about serving on the Oregon Racing Commission under Governor Douglas O. McKay after the war. He briefly describes lobbying for the Oregon State Cattlemen's Association and working as chief clerk of the Oregon House of Representatives. He then speaks at length about his experiences as secretary of the Senate. He talks about the changes in the Legislature during the 20th century, including salaries, staff sizes, and session length. He tells the story of discovering that the federal government owed a debt to Oregon dating back to the Civil War. Edwards talks about the fire that destroyed the Capitol building in 1935, the places where the Legislature convened afterwards, and the construction of the new Capitol. He closes the interview by talking a little about some of the governors he served under.

Edwards, Cecil L.

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