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Four unidentified women posing with crate at airfield

Full-length portrait of four unidentified women posing with a crate at an airfield. They are facing front and smiling. Three of the women are sitting on the crate and wearing swimsuits; the fourth is standing next to them. Painted on the crate are the words “From:- / Mitchell Heinemann / Portland Ore. / To:- / Star Clothing Company / Yakima Wash. / Via:- Tex Rankin Air Service.” In the background is a Rankin Flying Service monoplane. The photograph may be related to the Jantzen Knitting Mills, of which Mitchell Heinemann was sales manager.

Customers and police officer outside closed Morris Brothers bank in Portland

Photograph showing unidentified customers and a police officer outside the Morris Brothers Inc. investment bank in Portland on Monday, December 27, 1920, after the bank did not open for business. At left, an unidentified man is walking past as a second unidentified man speaks to a police officer who is standing in front of the doorway to the bank. A similar photograph, image No. 373G0336, was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on December 27, 1920, under the headline “Bond Purchasers Wait; Etheridge Flees.” The photograph had the following caption: “Some of the customers of Morris Brothers, Inc., who gathered at the iron barred door today and tried to gain admittance to ascertain the status of their investments. The police moved on them unceremoniously whenever the crowd got too large.” The photograph accompanied a story about the bank, headlined “Warrant Out for Capture of Etheridge.” The story reported that the bank might have a deficit of up to $1,000,000, and the bank president, John L. Etheridge, had fled. The story reported that a warrant had been issued for Etheridge’s arrest on a charge of larceny by bailee. See additional related image Nos. 376G0016 and 376G0018.

Augusta Carlson, witness at murder trial of John Cyril Liard

Three-quarters portrait of a woman, Augusta Carlson, sitting in a chair, facing slightly right, with her hands folded in her lap. She is wearing a hat, fur-trimmed jacket, and dress or skirt. The text “Carlson, Miss,” is written on the negative sleeve. Carlson was a witness in the trial of John Cyril Liard, who was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. The Journal reported that Carlson had told police she was in the car. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G0331, of Liard, were published on Page 15 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 12, 1919, under the headline “Versions of Crime Do Not Agree.” The photograph had the following caption: “Augusta Carlson and John Cyril Liard photographed by The Journal photographer as they sat in Judge Gantenbein's court, where the latter is on trial on a charge of second degree murder for the fatal shooting of Frank Walter Twombley, deputy sheriff, last November.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Liard Seeks To Prove An Alibi In Murder Case.” That story reported that Carlson and Liard had given conflicting accounts during the trial; Carlson had testified that Liard had killed Twombley, and Liard had testified that he was at home when the crime occurred, but Carlson was out in his car. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

Suspect George Billings, alias Joe Brady, at Multnomah County jail

Half-length portrait of George Billings facing front and smiling at the Multnomah County Jail. Billings was a suspect in a burglary case. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, January 27, 1921, under the headline “Held On Crime Charges.” The photograph had the following caption: “George Billings, alias Joe Brady, photographed in cell at county jail this morning, after refusal of Captain Harry Circle of police detective department to allow such picture taken Wednesday in the city jail, despite orders from Chief Jenkins that photographers be allowed to pose prisoner. Brady was affable and chatty making no objection to flashlight.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story headlined “Brady Says He’s Goat; 2 Identify Him.” On Sunday, March 5, 1921, the Journal reported that a grand jury had indicted Billings on three charges. Subsequently, on Friday, April 15, 1921, the Journal reported that a jury had acquitted Billings of one charge and the other two indictments had been dismissed. Image note: The text “Brady, Joe / Billings” is written on the negative sleeve.

George Rossman in court on first day as Portland municipal judge

Photograph, taken from the side, showing Portland Municipal Judge George Rossman seated at the bench in a courtroom on Wednesday, August 1, 1917. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 14 of the Oregon Journal that day. The photograph had the headline “Succeeds To Municipal Bench” and the caption: “George Rossman, who began duties this morning laid down by John H. Stevenson.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Municipal Judge And New Chief Of Police Occupy Their Posts.” Image note: The text “Rossman, municipal judge / & courtroom - Portland” is written on the negative sleeve.

John B. Kawacinski, killer of Harry I. Pawluk, at Multnomah County Jail

Head and shoulders portrait of a man at the Multnomah County Jail. He is sitting in a chair and facing to the right. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Monday, March 7, 1921, under the headline “Slayer Of His Shipmate.” The photograph had the following caption: “John Boleslaw Kawacinski, known also as John Bruno, who has confessed to the killing of Harry I. Pawluk, second cook on the steamship Montague, arrested at Seattle Saturday and now being held in the Multnomah county jail while real facts of grim story of debt, smuggling, and intrigue are being straightened out by the authorities.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Murderer of Pawluk Views Crime Scene” and the subheading “John Kawacinski, Who Confessed He Killed Shipmate on Barnes Road, Pleads Self-Defense; Police Look for Woman in Case.” On Thursday, April 14, 1921, the Journal reported that Kawacinski had been convicted of second-degree murder, and on Monday, April 18, 1921, the paper reported that he had been sentenced to life in the Oregon State Penitentiary. Image note: The text “Bruno, John / Murderer of Pawluk” is written on the negative sleeve.

Unidentified men with airplane hitched to tow truck at A. L. Campbell Auto Towing, Portland

Photograph showing several unidentified men looking at a parked tow truck outside A. L. Campbell Auto Towing in Portland. Hitched to the back of the truck is an airplane. The plane’s propeller is tied to the boom of the truck, and its back end of its fuselage is resting on two wheels. The plane’s wings are lashed to the top of the fuselage. The second man from left is wearing a coat with the text “G. G. Gerber” on the back.

Responders hoisting wrecked plane from Willamette River in Portland

Photograph showing people standing on a barge and a nearby boat as the wreckage of an airplane is hoisted from the Willamette River by its wings on Monday, May 30, 1932. The Oregon Journal published a story about the crash and a related photograph, image No. 374N0262, on the front page of its May 30, 1932 home edition. In the story, headlined “Woman Is Killed In Plane Dip,” the Journal reported that the plane’s engine exploded minutes after it departed from Swan Island airport in Portland en route to Seattle. The story reported that the pilot, Richard P. Gleason, attempted to glide the plane back to the airport, but it plunged into the river. Gleason was badly injured, and the flight’s single passenger, Mrs. Anna Smith, was killed. See additional related image Nos. 374N0260 and 374N0261.

Responders hoisting wrecked plane from Willamette River in Portland

Photograph showing rescuers aboard two boats hooking the wing of a wrecked airplane and pulling it from the Willamette River in Portland on Monday, May 30, 1932. At right is the harbor patrol boat F. W. Mulkey, which was dispatched to the scene. The Oregon Journal published a story about the crash and a related photograph, image No. 374N0262, on the front page of its May 30, 1932 home edition. In the story, headlined “Woman Is Killed In Plane Dip,” the Journal reported that the plane’s engine exploded minutes after it departed from Swan Island airport en route to Seattle. The story reported that the pilot, Richard P. Gleason, attempted to glide the plane back to the airport, but it plunged into the river. Gleason was badly injured, and the flight’s single passenger, Mrs. Anna Smith, was killed. See additional related image Nos. 374N0259 and 374N0260.

Amelia Earhart and five unidentified women

Full-length portrait of pilot Amelia Earhart (front row, center) with five unidentified women. Earhart and two of the women are sitting on a couch; the other three people are standing in a row behind them. Earhart is holding a bouquet of roses. The woman in the front row at left is wearing a ribbon with the words “Portland Chamber of Commerce / Hospitality” on it. The photograph was taken on Wednesday, February 1, 1933, after Earhart arrived in Portland to give a lecture. That day, a story about Earhart and a related photograph, image No. 374N0284, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal. See additional related image Nos. 371N0768 and 374N0282.

Tex Rankin, Amelia Earhart, and Dorothy Hester

Photograph showing (from left) pilots Tex Rankin, Amelia Earhart, and Dorothy Hester sitting in a row on a couch. Rankin and Earhart are looking toward Hester. Earhart is holding a bouquet of roses. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 1, 1933. The photograph had the headline “Noted Aviatrix in Portland” and the following caption: “Amelia Earhart, internationally famous woman flier, arrived in Portland early Wednesday to lecture at the Masonic temple Thursday night. She was met at the Union station by local members of the Ninety-Nine club, women’s flying organization, who breakfasted with her at the Benson hotel, and Tex Rankin, governor of Oregon of the National Aeronautics association. In the group are Tex Rankin, Miss Earhart, and Dorothy Hester.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Scribe Learns Miss Earhart is Very Feminine.” See related image Nos. 371N0768, 374N0282, and 374N0283.

Pilots Frank M. Hawks and Tex Rankin shaking hands at Swan Island airport, Portland

Photograph showing pilot Frank M. Hawks smiling as he shakes hands with pilot Tex Rankin at Swan Island airport in Portland on Saturday, November 28, 1931. In the background is Hawks’ plane. The photograph was taken after Hawks arrived from San Francisco for a brief stay in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal’s city edition on Sunday, November 29, 1931. The photographs were published under the headline “Three Hours From San Francisco.” They had the caption: “Captain Frank M. Hawks said his exact time from San Francisco to Portland Saturday was three hours and five minutes. But at that, he wasn’t trying for speed—just jogging along.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Hawks and his big smile.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about Hawks. Also see image Nos. 374N0276 and 374N0278, which were published with this photograph, and image No. 374N0300.

Vehicles on unidentified street, Portland

Photograph showing vehicles on an unidentified street in Portland. Streetcar tracks run down the center of the street. In the distance at center are a produce business and a General Gasoline station. In the background at right are signs that may read “Portland Auto Camp.” The number 6 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the photograph. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Pallbearers carrying casket of Archbishop Alexander Christie into St. Mary’s Cathedral, Portland

Photograph showing pallbearers carrying the casket of Archbishop Alexander Christie into St. Mary’s Cathedral at Northwest 15th and Davis in Portland on April 15, 1925, as people watch from either side of the doorway. That day, a front-page story about Christie’s funeral was published in the Oregon Journal city edition. The story had the headline “Throngs at Funeral of Archbishop” and the subheading “Impressive Last Rites Held for Most Rev. Alexander Christie in St. Marys [sic] Cathedral; Mt. Calvary is Resting Place.” See related image Nos. 371N4171, 371N4172, 371N4182, 371N4183, 371N4184, and 371N4185. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Procession from St. Mary’s Cathedral, Portland, after funeral of Archbishop Alexander Christie

Photograph, taken April 15, 1925, showing a crowd outside St. Mary’s Cathedral, Northwest 15th and Davis in Portland, watching clergy leaving the cathedral after the funeral of Archbishop Alexander Christie. That day, a front-page story about Christie’s funeral was published in the Oregon Journal city edition. The story had the headline “Throngs at Funeral of Archbishop” and the subheading “Impressive Last Rites Held for Most Rev. Alexander Christie in St. Marys [sic] Cathedral; Mt. Calvary is Resting Place.” See related image Nos. 371N4170, 371N4171, 371N4172, 371N4182, 371N4184, and 371N4185.

Temple Beth Israel and grounds, Portland

Photograph showing the west side of the Temple Beth Israel synagogue in Portland and the surrounding grounds, bounded by Glisan Street to the north; 19th Street North to the east; and Flanders Street to the south (now Northwest Glisan Street, Northwest 19th Avenue, and Northwest Flanders Street, respectively). The view of the temple is partially obstructed by trees in the foreground.

Nuns at The Grotto, Portland

Full-length portrait of six unidentified nuns at the National Sanctuary of Our Sorrowful Mother (The Grotto) in Portland. They are standing in a row in front of the grotto, a cave carved from the surrounding cliff face.

Temple Beth Israel, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the Temple Beth Israel synagogue, located in Portland at Northwest 19th Avenue between Northwest Glisan and Northwest Flanders streets. The photograph, taken at an angle from left of the entrance, shows the west side of the building. The doors are open and a barricade stands in front of them at the top of the steps. See related image Nos. 371N5751 and 371N5753.

Temple Beth Israel, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the Temple Beth Israel synagogue, located in Portland at Northwest 19th Avenue between Northwest Glisan and Northwest Flanders streets. The photograph, taken from the southwest corner of the building, shows the west side of the synagogue. The doors at the entrance are open and a barricade stands in front of them at the top of the steps. See related image Nos. 371N5750 and 371N5753. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Temple Beth Israel, Portland

Photograph, taken from the west side of the building, showing the exterior of the Temple Beth Israel synagogue, located in Portland at Northwest 19th Avenue between Northwest Glisan and Northwest Flanders streets. The doors at the entrance are open and a barricade stands in front of them at the top of the steps. See related image Nos. 371N5750 and 371N5751.

David Campbell memorial, Southwest Portland

Photograph showing the memorial to Portland Fire Chief David Campbell and the surrounding buildings, occupied by automotive businesses. The monument features a bronze bas-relief of Campbell set into a limestone base above a fountain. The memorial is between Southwest Alder Street and Southwest 18th and 19th avenues. Campbell was killed on June 26, 1911, while fighting a fire at the Union Oil distribution plant. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 13 that were published on Page 1, Section 2, of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, March 10, 1929. The photographs were part of a “motorlog” describing a car trip around Portland to view public art. The spread included photographs of the statues and the car driven on the trip; a map of the route; and a story, headlined “Memorials Grace City / Notable Works of Art Adorn Parks and Plazas of Portland, as Motorlog Shows.” The photographs were published under their own headline and subheading: “Portland’s Statues Viewed Via Motor / Delightful Drive in Reo Flying Cloud over Route that Includes Locations of Twelve of Portland’s Art Treasures.” The tour began and ended at the Journal Building at Southwest Broadway and Yamhill in downtown Portland. The Campbell memorial was stop number 8 on the trip. See related image Nos. 371N5421, 371N5461, 371N2898, 371N2899, 371N2900, and 371N2901, which were also part of the spread.

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