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Oral history interview with Jerome Kohlberg, Jr.

This oral history interview with Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at the St. Regis Hotel in New York, New York, from May 19-20, 1999. In this interview, Kohlberg discusses his experiences as a law clerk for Judge Gus Solomon from 1952 to 1953, including some of the cases Solomon heard, and Solomon's commitment to helping Jewish lawyers. He also briefly describes many of the lawyers and judges he met while in Portland, Oregon. He then talks about returning to New York to practice law and his continued relationship with Gus Solomon and Libby Solomon. He speaks at length about purchasing Fred Meyer in 1981 through his investment firm, Kohlberg, Kravis, Roberts (KKR & Co.), including his interactions with Fred G. Meyer, Oran B. Robertson, and Gerry Pratt. He closes the interview by briefly discussing how KKR has continued to manage Fred Meyer since its purchase.

Kohlberg, Jerome, Jr., 1925-2015

Oral history interview with Erskine B. Wood

This oral history interview with Erskine B. Wood was conducted by David Jacobson at Wood's home in Vancouver, Washington, on May 6, 1999. In this interview, Wood briefly discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including fishing on the Columbia River, as well as his education at a boarding school in California. He then discusses his experiences at Harvard College and at Harvard Law School. He talks about his interest in admiralty law, as well as the admiralty law career of his grandfather, C.E.S. Wood. He then discusses how World War II affected his law practice, as well as some of the cases he worked on, and some of the judges he argued before. He talks about his children and his service in the Navy during World War II. He closes the interview by discussing the changes in Oregon and his hopes for the state's future.

Wood, Erskine B. (Erskine Biddle), 1911-2001

Oral history interview with Libby Solomon

This oral history interview with Libby Solomon was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Solomon's apartment in Portland, Oregon, from October 25 to November 22, 1989. In this interview, Solomon discusses her family history and early life in Russia and Portland, including assimilating to American culture as a young child; the death of her older sister, Roza Willer; her Jewish upbringing; and her education. She then discusses her brief education at Reed College and her love for microscopic work. She briefly discusses her Democratic politics. She talks about working in medical labs with various doctors, particularly Edmund Sears. She discusses her involvement in the Democratic Party and the Oregon Commonwealth Federation, as well as the people she met through those organizations, including Monroe Sweetland, Ruth Haefner, and Gus Solomon, who became her spouse. She speaks at length about Gus Solomon's appointment to the U.S. District Court of Oregon. She discusses some of her later activities, including taking classes at the Portland Art Museum School, and serving on the Portland art and zoo commissions. She also talks about her and Gus Solomon's decision to quit all clubs and organizations that had discriminatory admittance policies. She closes the interview by discussing her work on integrated housing.

Solomon, Libby (Elisabeth), 1909-2004

Oral history interview with George M. Joseph

This oral history interview with George M. Joseph was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Joseph's home in Portland, Oregon, from August 7 to November 7, 2001, and on February 25, 2002. The portion of the interview recorded on February 25, 2002, was conducted at the Friendship Health Center in Portland, where Joseph was recovering from a broken leg. The first tape of this 27-tape interview features a brief overview of Joseph's entire life and career.

Beginning from Tape 2 of this interview, Joseph discusses his family background and early life in Boise, Idaho, including a store his mother ran in Boise, and the early death of his father from tuberculosis of the bone. He also describes a 1938 visit from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Boise; his awareness of the Depression; the Mormon community in Boise; and his family's own Catholicism. He also speaks about contracting polio as a child and the lifelong physical issues it caused, as well as his memories of the internment of Japanese-Americans and other events during World War II. He then discusses his education, including attending Menlo School in Atherton, California, and Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) in Boise, Idaho; hitchhiking home; and his social life. He also discusses attending the University of San Francisco and Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political views. He speaks at length about a recurrence of polio during his senior year at Reed and the extensive treatment and physical therapy he undertook as a result. He then talks about studying law at the University of Chicago, including his divorce from his first wife, Elizabeth Kalisher, and his subsequent marriage to Elizabeth Starr, as well as coming to the realization that he did not want to be a lawyer. He describes Elizabeth Starr's family background and early life, as well as their wedding and honeymoon. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, particularly acting as an alternate delegate for the 1956 Democratic National Convention.

Joseph discusses his return to Oregon in 1955 and his early legal career as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice George Rossman. He briefly describes the judges on the Oregon Supreme Court at that time, as well as some of the cases Rossman presided over. He discusses teaching law at many different universities outside Oregon, including Ohio Northern University. He then describes working in the Multnomah County district attorney's office under George Van Hoomisen, as well as his ambitions of becoming a judge. He talks about several cases he prosecuted and making a name for himself as a criminal appellate prosecutor; the focus of the district attorney's office on vice cases, including an undercover operation that Joseph compromised; and civil rights cases he was involved with, particularly involving the people with mental illnesses. He talks about the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals and the subsequent increase in the workload of the district attorney's office; Jacob B. Tanzer and other county-level judges; and his relationship with Multnomah County sheriff, and later Multnomah County commissioner, Don E. Clark. He then talks about his brief career as a lawyer in various private law firms in Portland, his involvement in the passage of the Multnomah County Home Rule Charter, and his ongoing attempts to become a judge. He speaks at length about Multnomah County politics and Don Clark's accomplishments as county commissioner. He talks about serving as Multnomah County counsel, including working on public power and city-county consolidation. He also discusses briefly teaching at Lewis & Clark College.

Joseph next discusses serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1992. He describes the other judges on the court, including Robert Y. Thornton, Herbert M. Schwab, Betty Roberts, Jason D. Lee and William L. Richardson. He talks about writing opinions, the types of cases he heard, and his staff. He also describes the procedures and operating practices of the court. He shares his observations on the changes in the Oregon Supreme Court since the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1981 to 1992. He closes the interview by discussing his service on the Board of Bar Examiners and his involvement in the creation of a uniform bar exam, as well as reforms that have been made to the Oregon court system.

Joseph, George Manley, 1930-2003

Oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen

This oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen was conducted by Susan C. Glen from April 22 to June 10, 1995. In this interview, Bratzel Kremen discusses her family background and early life in Mulino, Gresham, Silverton and Salem, Oregon, including facing anti-German sentiment during World War I, working on the family orchard, and her education. She discusses the limited career opportunities open to women, her decision to pursue work as a secretary in law offices, and working as a court reporter. She then talks about attending Northwestern College of Law (which later became a part of Lewis & Clark College) at age 37, including her professors, her women classmates, and working full time as a court reporter while studying. She also describes serving as a court reporter for Judge James T. Brown at the Nuremberg Trials in 1947, as well as her travels around post-war Europe. She talks about her first race for the office of Marion County district attorney in 1951. She discusses practicing law in Salem, including representing mothers in custody cases. She then discusses her service as Marion County district attorney from 1956 to 1964, including cases she prosecuted and the long hours she kept. She briefly talks about her marriage to Leonard Kremen, as well as his family background and early life. She then discusses her return to private practice in 1964 and focusing largely on probate law. She closes the interview by talking about her travels.

Kremen, Hattie Bratzel, 1908-1996

Oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer

This oral history interview with Otto J. Frohnmayer was conducted by Clark Hansen at Frohnmayer's office in Medford, Oregon, from November 28 to December 1, 1989. In this interview, Frohnmayer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including facing anti-German sentiment during World War I, his education, and vacations to Seaside. He discusses working in hotels and attending the University of Oregon, including his social life and studying law. He then talks about his early law practice in Medford. He also talks about the effects of the Depression and World War II on the Medford area. He briefly describes some of the judges he argued before. He speaks at length about notable cases he worked on, as well as changes in laws over the 20th century. He then talks about his wife, MarAbel Fisher Braden, and their family life. He talks about the politics involved in judicial appointments; jury trials; and the profession of law. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

Frohnmayer, Otto J. (Otto John), 1905-2000

Oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus

This oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus was conducted by Mary Ellen Page Farr in Ashland, Oregon, from March 13, 1999, to February 19, 2000. In this interview, Althaus discusses her family background, particularly her family's history of civil rights activism, and her early life on a farm in Troutdale, Oregon, including her education, her interest in science, and her social life. She discusses her experiences as law clerk for Judge James Alger Fee, from 1947 to 1949. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, with the law firm King Miller, now known as Miller Nash, from 1953 to 1970, including some of the cases she argued and other women lawyers she worked with. She closes the interview by briefly discussing her work as deputy city attorney for Portland from 1949 to 1953.

Althaus, Helen F.

Oral history interview with Cherie Hiser, by Jim Morris

  • SR 3125
  • Collection
  • 1981-12-06

Hiser discusses The Center of the Eye in Colorado, photographers she has worked with, photography techniques, portrait photography, her recent photography projects, including portraits of gay men and tattooed people, photography as therapy, studying photography with Minor White, and teaching photography.

Hiser, Cherie

Oral history interview with Claire Argow, by Roberta Watts

  • SR 9090
  • Collection
  • 1977-11-28 - 1977-12-02

Argow discusses her education and career in social work and criminology in New England, particularly Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut, and in Oregon. She also discusses prison conditions, capital punishment, advances in corrections in Oregon, her work with the Oregon Prison Association, teaching at Pacific University, her work with the Oregon Women’s Correctional Institution, women and crime, and moving to Oregon in 1945.

Argow, Claire

Oral history interview with Lawrence Leighton Smith, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9343
  • Collection
  • 1980-05-12

Smith discusses his early musical education, his career as a pianist and conductor, mostly in New England, and his experiences as conductor and music director for the Oregon Symphony in Portland, Oregon.

Smith, Lawrence Leighton

Oral history interview with Fred D. Miller

This oral history interview with Fred D. Miller was conducted by Pat Collmeyer at the Portland General Electric offices in the World Trade Center in Portland, Oregon, from October 12, 1993, to June 7, 1994. Miller discusses his family background and early life in Southwest Portland. He also discusses his experiences at Willamette University, Portland State University, and Michigan State University, including studying abroad in Argentina. He talks about becoming a professor at Oregon State University in 1967 in order to get a deferment from the draft, and about teaching abroad in Peru and with World Campus Afloat. Miller discusses his involvement with the Oregon State Legislature as special assistant to the director of the Oregon Department of Transportation, and talks about the Mount Hood Freeway. He also talks about working with George Baldwin, Glenn Jackson, and Bob Burco. He then describes his time as director of the Oregon Department of Energy from 1976 to 1979, replacing Lon Topaz, and discusses nuclear power plants and electrical utilities. He also talks about working with Janet McLennan and Mike Katz. Miller discusses his time as assistant director, then director, of the Oregon Department of Transportation, from 1979 to 1987, including funding and gas taxes. Miller also discusses working under governors Tom McCall, Bob Straub, Vic Atiyeh, Neil Goldschmidt, and Barbara Roberts. In addition, he talks about Corrections Director Michael Francke and his murder in 1989. Miller closes the interview by discussing the various management styles of the many governors he served under.

Miller, Fred D., 1942-

Oral History Interview with Vera Katz, by Linda Brody

  • SR 9044
  • Collection
  • 1992-04-28 - 1992-05-19

Vera Katz discusses her early life and education, and later political career through 1982. Her family immigrated to the United States during world War II and she grew up in New York, where she became involved in Modern Dance, studying under Martha Graham. After moving to Portland to support her husband's art career, she became involved in local politics, ultimately becoming a State Representative in 1972, where she was a part of the 1973 Women's Caucus, which passed many landmark pieces of legislation. She also discusses her plans for the future.

Katz, Vera, 1933-2017

Oregon Wine Oral History Series

  • SR Oregon Wine Oral History Series
  • Collection
  • 1990-2003

A series of oral history interviews collected between 1999 and 2003 with prominent winemakers in Oregon.

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman

This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman's office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London in England; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Oral history interview with Tom McCall

  • SR 298
  • Collection
  • 1973-03-12

This oral history interview with Oregon Governor Tom McCall was conducted by Steve Lorton on March 12, 1973, and was one of a number of interviews with governors of Western states on the occasion of Sunset Magazine's 75th anniversary. McCall describes his experiences in government and politics, along with challenges including growth and conservation in Oregon. He mentions members of the Oregon Legislature, including Bob Packwood, Keith Miller, Daniel Evans, Cecil Andrus, and Richard Neuberger. He also discusses legislation that was forthcoming at the time of the interview, including the Oregon Bottle Bill. He closes the interview by discussing his plans for Oregon's future.

McCall, Tom, 1913-1983

Oral history interview with Charles A. Sprague

  • SR 155
  • Collection
  • 1962-07-18

This interview with Charles A. Sprague was conducted by Robert Bruce of the Capitol News Bureau in Sprague's office at the Oregon Statesman in Salem on July 18, 1962. It was broadcast on the radio as part of the Living History Series. In the interview, Sprague briefly discusses his family history and early life in the Midwest. He then talks about his career in journalism and ownership of the Corvallis Gazette-Times and the Statesman, as well as big news stories during that time, including the labor movement. Sprague also discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his term as governor of Oregon during World War II. He also talks about landmark legislation that was passed during his term, particularly the establishment of the state forest system, as well as his thoughts on amending the Oregon Constitution. He closes the interview with a discussion about contemporary American culture.

Sprague, Charles A. (Charles Arthur), 1887-1969

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