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Oral history interview with Sidney Leiken

This oral history interview with Sidney Leiken was conducted by Clark Hansen at Leiken's office in Roseburg, Oregon, on June 8, 1992. In the interview, Leiken discusses his family background and early life in New Haven, Connecticut, including the effect the Depression had on his family and his experience in the Civilian Conservation Corps, which brought him to Oregon. He then discusses working at sawmills, his marriage to Thora Hult, and the lumber business. He discusses moving to Roseburg, Oregon, starting a family, and getting into politics, including his involvement with the Democratic Party. Leiken talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1961 to 1967. He describes his campaign and constituency in Douglas County. He talks about legislation, including on taxes, community colleges, timber, labor, and land use. He also talks about his fellow legislators, including Monte Montgomery, Al Flegel, Jason Boe, and W.O. Kelsay. He also discusses working on Bob Duncan's campaign for the U.S. Senate in 1966. Leiken talks about leaving politics, his wife's cancer diagnosis, and her subsequent death in 1969. He goes on to talk about the changes in the Democratic Party since then, as well as partisan politics during his terms in the Legislature. He closes the interview with some words of advice to aspiring politicians, and a discussion of his family life.

Leiken, Sidney, 1916-2012

Oral history interview with Douglas R. Spencer

This oral history interview with Douglas R. Spencer was conducted by Craig J. Capon in Eugene, Oregon, from February 27 to June 20, 2008. In this interview, Spencer discusses his children and grandchildren, as well as his family background and early life in Eugene. He talks about going to the Lane County courthouse to watch trials for fun during high school. He then talks about attending Harvard University for several years before his naval reserve unit was activated in 1944. He describes his naval service in the Pacific Theater during World War II, including an experience when his ship was hit by a kamikaze. He talks about returning to finish his degree and study law at Harvard in 1946, and describes some of his classes and his social life. He then talks about returning to Eugene to prepare for the Oregon bar exam, meeting Amy Lou Ware, and their subsequent marriage.

Spencer discusses working as an assistant Lane County district attorney from 1949 to 1951. He talks about some of the cases he prosecuted, some of the judges he argued before, and lawyers he worked with. He then talks about practicing law in Cottage Grove for six months. He discusses teaching at the University of Oregon as an adjunct professor, then joining the Eugene law firm Bailey & Hoffman in 1953. He describes his daily life as a law associate, as well as his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes events in the Lane County bar and Circuit Court that led up to his appointment to the court in 1967, particularly regarding Judge Frank Reid. He discusses serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court from 1967 to 1989. He describes his daily activities as a judge and his staff. He also talks about changes in the court over the years, particularly societal changes and how they affected the judicial system. He describes some of the more complicated cases he heard, particularly those involving the death penalty. He discusses his reasons for retiring in 1989, as well as his retirement activities. He closes the interview by talking about the differences between the state and federal judiciary.

Spencer, Douglas R., 1923-2013

Oral history interview with Irvin Luiten

This oral history interview with Irvin "Irv" Herman Luiten was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from March 16, 1988, to January 19, 1990, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Luiten discusses his family background and early life on wheat farms in Ritzville and Edwall, Washington, including his early education and the struggles his family faced during the Great Depression. He then describes studying journalism at Washington State University in the late 1930s, including the evolution of his political views and his interest in radio broadcasting. He discusses his early career as a journalist for the Colville Examiner from 1940 to 1941 and for the Northwest Farm News in 1941. Luiten also talks extensively about his service during World War II, including acting as defense counsel for his battalion and about soldier morale. He talks about his work with the Military Intelligence Service to teach escape and evasion tactics to airmen and setting up lines of escape in France.

Next, he describes his post-war life, including taking the editorship of the Northwest Farm News; marrying Ellen Boyde and raising a family; taking a job at Washington State University; and beginning his career with the Weyerhaeuser Company, doing public relations work as a writer for Weyerhaeuser News. He talks about aspects of Weyerhaeuser that made him loyal to the company, including the company's forest management practices and the management style of Phil Weyerhaeuser. Luiten also describes his experiences as a lobbyist for Weyerhaeuser from 1953 to 1978. He talks about the primary issues Weyerhauser was concerned with, including taxes, particularly timber taxes; pollution; land use; environmental law; and labor laws. Luiten also discusses his involvement with the Izaak Walton League of America and his conservation work; the Clemons Tree Farm; the workplace culture at Weyerhaeuser; and the company's relationship with the public. He goes on to talk about working with lobbyists for other Oregon timber interests, the different timber harvesting philosophies between Weyerhaeuser and Georgia-Pacific, and how those philosophies affected the economy of the state. He speaks at length on the importance of public relations work. He also discusses working with legislators such as Mark Hatfield, Dick Neuberger, Clarence Barton, Dick Eymann, and Vic Atiyeh. He closes the interview by talking about his life in retirement.

Luiten, Irvin H. (Irvin Herman), 1915-1997

Oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson

This oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson was conducted by Jeffrey C. Dobbins in Salem, Oregon, from August 21 to December 11, 2007. Throughout the interview, Peterson refers to photographs and letters. Copies of some, but not all, of these items are included in the related U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society collection, Coll 560.

In this interview, Peterson discusses his family background in Gilmanton, Wisconsin, including the local creamery managed by his father; his childhood activities; and his early education. He also talks about his memories of rural life during World War II. He discusses having asthma and moving to Oregon in 1944 in an effort to improve his health, as well as his high school experience in Eugene. He talks about studying music at the University of Oregon, including his social life, his summer activities, and his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes his service as a personnel officer in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, particularly his experience in administration. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon law school, including the dean, Orlando Hollis; his social life; and his summer jobs. He talks about relocating to Portland to practice law at Tooze, Kerr, Peterson, Marshall & Shenker. He speaks at length about the practice of law, as well as some of the cases he tried, some of his fellow lawyers, and judges he argued before. He particularly focuses on trial preparation and procedures. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, and his friendship with Clay Myers.

Peterson discusses serving on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993. He talks about his appointment by Governor Vic Atiyeh. He describes his fellow judges on the Supreme Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He also shows Dobbins his collection of photographs and speaks about them at length. He discusses the procedures of the Supreme Court, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election in 1980. He talks about serving as chief justice from 1983 to 1991, including implementing an integrated court system, the court's budget, and the court's staff. He reads entries from his journals detailing this part of his career. He also discusses the changes in technology, rules of professionalism, and diversity training. He closes the interview by talking about his activities since retiring in 1993, including teaching at the Willamette University law school and working as a mediator.

Peterson, Edwin J. (Edwin Junior), 1930-

Oral history interview with Hector Macpherson, Jr.

This oral history interview with Hector Macpherson, Jr. was conducted by Clark Hansen at Macpherson's farm in Oakville, Oregon, from February 14-25, 1992. MacPherson's wife, Katharine "Kitty" Macpherson, was also present. In this interview, Macpherson discusses his family background and early life on a dairy farm in central Oregon. He speaks at length about his father, Hector Macpherson, Sr., and his activism regarding farm cooperatives and higher education. He then discusses his high school education, particularly his involvement in debate; the history of the land his family's dairy farm is on; and life for farmers during the Depression. He talks about studying science at Oregon State College, training for his military service during World War II, and meeting Kitty. He then discusses running a dairy farm, including water rights and milk pricing. He describes his interest in land-use planning in rural areas. Macpherson also talks about his time in the Oregon Senate from 1971 to 1974, particularly his work on Senate Bill 100, which concerned land-use planning. He also talks about his involvement with the Republican Party, his political campaign against Glenn Huston, and the election of John Burns as Senate president. He speaks about the nature of his constituency, and his thoughts on why rural areas tend to oppose environmental regulation. He then discusses other legislation he worked on, including on field burning, bicycle paths, the Bottle Bill, and additional land use planning. He talks about legislators he worked with, particularly Vic Atiyeh, Jason Boe, Ted Hallock, and Betty Roberts. He closes the interview with a discussion about serving on the Land Conservation and Development Commission, land-use laws in other states, and his impressions of the 1992 Oregon delegation to Congress.

Macpherson, Hector, Jr., 1918-2015

Oral history interview with Diarmuid O'Scannlain

O'Scannlain discusses his family background and Irish heritage, his childhood in New York City, his education at St. John's Prep and Harvard, his involvement with the National Young Republicans and Trumpeters, his work as a lawyer in Portland, Oregon with the Dave Briggs firm (aka Stoel Rices) and Ragen, Roberts & O'Scannlain, his involvement in Republican politics and the Reagan administration, nuclear power, his appointment to the 9th Circuit Court, and some of the cases he oversaw while on that court.

O'Scannlain, Diarmuid F.

Oral history interview with Caroline P. Stoel

This oral history interview with Caroline P. Stoel was conducted by Adair Law from October 30 to December 5, 2006. Along with the interview recordings, the collection includes an incomplete transcript.

In this interview, Stoel discusses her family background and early life in Lexington, North Carolina, including her early education and childhood friends. She talks about attending Duke University, including her social life. She then talks about her experience as one the few women attending the Duke University Law School. She also discusses meeting Thomas B. Stoel and their subsequent marriage. She describes the sexism she faced when trying to begin her legal career in Portland, Oregon. She talks about working and raising young children while Thomas Stoel was serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. She discusses her involvement in her children's education in the Riverdale School District; her acquaintanceship with Richard Nixon; and her decision to return to college. She closes the interview by talking about her children, their careers, and their families.

Stoel, Caroline P.

Oral history interview with John D. Mosser

This oral history interview with John D. Mosser was conducted by Clark Hansen at Mosser's home in Portland, Oregon, from November 15 to December 11, 1990. In this interview, Mosser discusses his family background and early life in the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. He talks about attending Princeton and working on the school newspaper, as well as his service in the U.S. Army during World War II, which interrupted his education. He details his experience fighting on the front lines in France. He discusses studying law at Yale, his marriage to Priscilla Alexander, and coming to Oregon to practice law, primarily admiralty law, in 1950.

Mosser discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his legislative service in the Oregon House of Representatives in 1957, including his campaign. He discusses legislation he worked on, particularly on education. He then discusses his activities before he re-entered the Legislature in 1963, including lobbying and raising a family. He goes on to talk about his return to the Oregon House of Representatives from 1963 to 1966. He discusses additional education legislation that he worked on, as well as legislation on taxes, labor, and land use. He speaks at length about the many legislators he worked with, particularly Vera Katz and Vic Atiyeh. He discusses his reasons for leaving the Legislature and his subsequent activities, including serving on the Board of Education and the Land Conservation and Development Commission, continuing his law practice, and leaving the Republican Party. He discusses serving on the Portland Waterfront Commission in the late 1960s, and his involvement in the creation of Tom McCall Waterfront Park. He closes the interview by talking about his family.

Mosser, John D. (John Daniel), 1923-1996

Oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry

This oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry was conducted by Clark Hansen at Newbry's home in Talent, Oregon, from May 6-7, 1993. In this interview, Newbry discusses his family background and early life in Talent, including life on the family farm and the Depression. He also discusses the political career of his father, Earl T. Newbry. He talks about his education in Talent, as well as attending Oregon State College, and then Pomona College. He also briefly discusses serving in the Air Force during World War II. He discusses his courtship with Charlotte Short and their subsequent marriage in 1943. He discusses his return to Oregon in 1945 and taking over the family orchards and fruit business in 1949 when his father was appointed secretary of state, as well as several community organizations he was involved with. He discusses his involvement with the Republican Party, serving on the Talent school board, and running for the Oregon Senate in 1960. He discusses his legislative career in the Senate from 1961 to 1974, including his committee assignments. He also talks about his fellow legislators, including Harry Boivin, Grace Peck, Ted Hallock, Stafford Hansell, Debbs Potts, Bill Holmstrom, and Jason Boe. He also discusses legislation he worked on, including on land use, labor, taxes, health care, and agriculture. He talks about the administrations of governors Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, and Neil Goldschmidt; coalitions in the Senate; the procedure of creating legislation; and reapportionment. He closes the interview by discussing SB 100, the land-use planning bill of 1974.

Newbry, Lynn W. (Lyndel Warren), 1923-2012

Oral history interview with Ellen Goldberg, by Annica Eagle and Spencer Trueax

Ellen Goldberg is a lesbian activist who was one of the co-founders of the Mountain Moving Café, a collectively run restaurant that was created to engender networking, collaboration, and particularly political organizing. The café, with its large dance floor and performance stage, featured different entertainment every night of the month and was well-known for it's Wednesday Women's Nights (on these evenings, men were turned away). An earlier interview with Goldberg, addressing the café and radical political organizing, was conducted in 1978 (SR6314).

Goldberg, Ellen

Oral history interview with Sally Cohn, by Jade Davis and Erin Babcock Musick

Sally Cohn is a lesbian activist who has been involved with many organizations in Portland, Oregon since the 1970s. She discusses several topics including her involvement with the Lesbian Community Project, Old Lesbians Organizing for Change, lesbian stereotypes, women’s softball, and what it was like to fight anti-gay ballot measures. She also talks about her appearance on national television doing her “hand whistling.”

Cohn, Sally H.

Oral history interview with Earl T. Newbry

This oral history interview with Earl T. Newbry was conducted by Clark Hansen at Newbry's home in Ashland, Oregon, from July 23-24, 1990. In this interview, Newbry discusses his family background and early life, mostly in Eastern Oregon and northeastern Washington. He talks about working on and running the family orchard, Newbry Orchards. He then discusses his involvement in local politics in Jackson County, Oregon. He talks about his legislative career in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1939 to 1942 and in the Oregon Senate from 1943 to 1948, including his campaigns; balancing work and family; lobbyists; and his constituency. He also discusses many of his fellow legislators, including William McAllister, Truman Chase, and Eugene Marsh. He talks about legislation he worked on, including on labor, transportation, and taxes. He then discusses being secretary of state from 1949 to 1955, as well as his 1954 run for the governor's office. He discusses the duties of the secretary of state, including overseeing the Department of Motor Vehicles. He also talks about being a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1954 and his involvement with the Republican Party. He then discusses Oregon governors and legislators who served after he left politics, and reflects on his own accomplishments. He closes the interview by talking about his family, particularly his son, Lynn Newbry, and his political career.

Newbry, Earl T., 1900-1995

Oral history interview with Michael S. Lincicum

This oral history interview with Michael S. Lincicum was conducted by John P. Strassmaier from January 11 to April 6, 2011. In this interview, Lincicum discusses family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his early education. He discusses attending Willamette University, particularly his role as president of his fraternity. He talks about attending the University of Wisconsin and his transfer to the University of Oregon. He also talks about student protests against the Vietnam War and his feelings about the prospect of being drafted. He describes how his status as a conscientious objector led to a job working for the Oregon Educational Coordinating Commission. He describes conducting a study on education programs for children with disabilities and speaks at length about the reforms that were underway during Governor Tom McCall's administration. He also discusses his other duties at the commission. He then talks about working as a budget analyst under Robert W. Smith for the Oregon Budget and Management Division. He describes Smith's philosophy of budget analysis; his first assignment as budget analyst for the Mental Health Division; and the process of calculating budgets without computers. He describes the workplace culture in state government and how it changed under different governors. Lincicum discusses working as administrative services director for the Oregon Children Services Department, then in the Oregon Mental Health Services Department. He speaks at length about mismanagement of Mental Health Services, particularly at Fairview Hospital. He also talks about his brief time as acting director of Mental Health Services; the decertification and re-certification of Fairview Hospital; a state employee strike in the late 1980s; and personnel changes at the various state hospitals. He talks about the closure of Damasch Hospital; leaving the Mental Health Services Department; working as an administrator for the Oregon Health Plan; and returning to the Budget and Management Division. He speaks at length about political appointees he's worked with and other state departments he did projects for, particularly the Department of Motor Vehicles. He talks about his job duties leading up to his retirement in 2000. He closes the interview by talking about his retirement activities.

Lincicum, Michael S., 1946-

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills

This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.

In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father's construction business, discusses her early education, and speaks about her father's death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war.

Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger's Senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger's role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger's personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers' senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers' cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Charles O. Porter

This oral history interview with Charles O. Porter was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Porter's office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 18 to November 7, 1986. In this interview, Porter discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including his education at Eugene High School, working for newspapers in the area, and his early political ambitions. He then talks about attending Harvard. He speaks at length about his experiences in Panama, and later in Europe, during World War II. He then talks about returning to Harvard, job prospects, and returning to Oregon to take a job on the state Highway Commission. He discusses practicing law in Eugene, including his experience with various judges, some of the cases he worked on, and the administration of justice. He then talks about getting involved in politics, including being offered the position of assistant to the U.S. attorney general by Monroe Sweetland. He turned down the offer and ran for Congress instead.

Porter discusses representing the Fourth District of Oregon in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1956 to 1960, particularly his campaigns. He talks about his fellow legislators, including Wayne Morse, Maurine Neuberger, Edith Green, and Joseph McCarthy. He discusses parliamentary procedure and legislation he worked on, particularly on foreign policy in Latin America. He also talks about his relationship with the press; his involvement with Amnesty International; and his activities as a lawyer after his 1960 re-election loss. He discusses many of the cases he worked on, including on prisoners' rights, fluoridation, sterilization, and a case against the Air Force. He closes the interview by talking about his family and the livability of Oregon.

Porter, Charles O. (Charles Orlando), 1919-2006

Oral History Interview with Bette Lee

  • SR 11258
  • Collection
  • 2014-06-17 - 2014-12-29

Bette Lee discusses her activism and career in photographing protests, beginning in the San Fransisco Bay Area in the 1980s, and later in Portland, Oregon. She discusses several specific photographs, many of which can be found in the transcript. Protests and movements discussed include the Portland Alliance, Indie Media, World trade Organization, Iraq War, Occupy Wall Street, Livermore Action Group, etc.

Lee, Bette

Oral history interview with Betty Roberts

This oral history interview of Betty Roberts was conducted by Clark Hansen from March 24, 1992, to September 19, 1994, at Roberts' home in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Roberts describes her early life and family background, including growing up in Texas during the Depression and her father's alcohol poisoning. She also discusses meeting her first husband, John Willard "Bill" Rice, as well as their marriage and starting a family in Oregon. Roberts discusses attending Portland State College and the strain it put on her marriage to Rice; discrimination she encountered as an older woman student; and pursuing a master's degree at the University of Oregon. She also talks about her divorce from Rice due to his objection to her working outside the home, the divorce's effect on her children, and her subsequent marriage to Frank L. Roberts. She also discusses her divorce from Frank Roberts in 1965.

Roberts discusses her career as an educator, including teaching at high schools in East Portland; serving on school boards; and her activity in the Oregon Education Association. She talks about meeting her third husband, Keith Skelton; civil liberties; her involvement in the Democratic Party; and practicing law. She then talks about her experiences in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968, including campaigning, sexist media coverage, and teaching high school and attending law school at Northwestern College of Law while in the Legislature. Roberts discusses legislation she worked on during her time in the House, primarily on education, including sick leave for teachers and universal kindergarten.

Roberts also discusses her 1968 campaign for the Oregon Senate against Tom Mahoney, as well as the 1968 presidential campaign, including the debate around the Vietnam War and her attendance at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois, with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. She then discusses her experience in the Oregon Senate from 1969 to 1977, including legislation on taxes, particularly sales taxes; women's rights; abortion; environmental issues; rape shield laws; and child custody. She discusses working with Debbs Potts, John D. Burns, and Gracie Peck, and and talks about running for governor against Bob Straub in 1974. She also discusses her run for the U.S. Senate against Bob Packwood the same year. She talks about the various forms of sexism she encountered while in the Senate, the formation of the Women's Caucus in 1973, and support for the Equal Rights Amendment.

Roberts talks about her time as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1982, and about working alongside judges Herbert Schwabe and W. Michael Gillette. She describes being appointed to the Oregon Supreme Court by Governor Vic Atiyeh and the encouragement she received from Norma Paulus. She discusses several cases from the years 1982 to 1986, including cases regarding sex discrimination and misuse of taxpayer monies. She also talks about her law clerk, Maureen Leonard, and about working alongside judges Jacob Tanzer and Mercedes Deiz. Roberts relates her opinion on the efficacy and procedures of the judicial system in Oregon. She discusses her activities after resigning from the court, including her involvement with Oregon Women Lawyers and the Bob Packwood sexual harassment scandal.

Roberts, Betty, 1923-2011

Oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards

This oral history interview with Cecil L. Edwards was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Capitol building in Salem, Oregon, on October 31, 1991. In the interview, Edwards discusses the life and political career of Jason Boe, a conservative Democrat who was president of the Oregon Senate from 1973 to 1980. He discusses the improvements Boe made to the Capitol building; his political influence on the House; and his relationship to Governor Tom McCall. Edwards briefly discusses the balance of powers between the executive and legislative branches in Oregon. He talks about Boe's political ambitions, his efforts for school financing, and his role in passing some of the landmark legislation of the 1970s, including on land use. Edwards also describes Boe's personality and sense of humor. Edwards closes the interview by discussing his own career as legislative historian.

Edwards, Cecil L.

Oral history interview with Ambrose A. Oderman

  • SR 11275
  • Collection
  • 2005-04-05 - 2005-04-25

In this interview, Oderman discusses his family background and early life in Foxholm, North Dakota. He describes his experience during the 1918 flu pandemic, including the death of his father. He discusses his mother's remarriage and his early education. He talks about moving to Monroe, Oregon, in 1926, as well as his high school experience there. He then discusses studying business at the University of Oregon during the Depression, including his plans to become an accountant. He also tells several stories about growing up on a farm. He discusses working for the Public Utility Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration as an accountant and auditor. He talks about his family and his social life during that time. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and living in Vanport, Oregon, after the end of the war. He discusses his service as western region audit director for the U.S. Interior Department. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement.

Oderman, Ambrose A. (Ambrose Adolph), 1912-2014

Oral history interview with Bob Straub

This oral history interview with Bob Straub was conducted by Clark Hansen at Straub's home near Salem, Oregon, from May 14 to June 17, 1991. Pat Straub was also present. In this interview, Straub discusses his family background and early life in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. He then discusses attending Dartmouth College; meeting his wife, Pat Stroud; and serving in World War II. He then talks about running his own business as a building contractor in Springfield, Oregon; his involvement with the Democratic Party; and getting into politics by running for Lane County commissioner in 1954. He discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1959 to 1962, including his campaign and constituency. He also discusses his fellow legislators, including Charles Porter, Alfred Corbett, and Howell Appling. He also discusses legislation he worked on, including on taxes. He talks about working with prominent politicians while chairman of the Democratic Party in Oregon, including Monroe Sweetland; serving on the Board of Control; and serving as state treasurer from 1965 to 1973 under Governor Tom McCall. He then discusses ranching in the years before he served as governor. He discusses his 1974 campaign for governor against Vic Atiyeh; his staff, particularly Stafford Hansell; and administrative and judicial appointments he made, including appointing Ron Wyden to the Nursing Board, Wally Carson to the Marion County Circuit Court, and Betty Roberts to the appellate court. He also discusses his working relationship with the Legislature. He talks about many of the issues he dealt with as governor. He speaks briefly about his involvement in the creation of the Willamette Greenway. He then speaks briefly about several national and state politicians, including President Jimmy Carter, U.S. Senator Wayne Morse, and congressman Bob Duncan. He closes the interview by discussing his family life and activities since leaving politics.

Straub, Robert W.

Oral history interview with Cindy Cumfer, by Erik Funkhouser and Tim Aguirre

Cindy Cumfer discusses her involvement with the lesbian and women's communities in Portland, Oregon; her work as a civil rights attorney, particularly in the area of lesbian adoption; the AIDS epidemic and how it bridge the divide between the gay and lesbian communities; and her involvement with the Unitarian Universalist Church.

Cumfer, Cynthia

Oral history interview with Monroe and Lil Sweetland

  • SR 1129
  • Collection
  • 1976-08-17

This oral history interview with Monroe and Lil Sweetland was conducted by their daughter, Barbara Sweetland, on August 17, 1976. In this interview, the Sweetlands discusses their college experiences. Monroe Sweetland talks about attending Cornell University and Syracuse Law School in New York. Lil Sweetland discusses attending Smith College in Massachusetts. They both discuss meeting through their political activism while in New York; their reasons for being anti-war during the lead-up to World War II; and their involvement with the Socialist Party.

Sweetland, Monroe, 1910-2006

Oral history interview with Kimberlee Van Patten, by Katie Horton and Amy Sherwood

Katie Horton and Amy Sherwood, PSU students, interviewed Kimberlee Van Patten on February 12th 2009. Kimberlee Van Patten has been involved with the Imperial Sovereign Rose Court and Peacock in the Park for several years. During the interview we discussed her life in general, from her childhood to the present, as well as her involvement with both the Court and Peacock in the Park. Kimberlee told us a little about Lady Elaine Peacock and the Audria M. Edwards Scholarship Fund and also about many of the members of the Rose Court. We discussed other new projects she is working on and her favorite memories and some sad moments from the projects that she has worked on in the past.

Van Patten, Kimberlee

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