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Oral history interview with Kernan H. Bagley

This oral history interview with Kernan H. Bagley was conducted by Brent E. Turvey from February 9 to March 17, 1993. In this interview, Bagley discusses his family background and early life on a farm near Portland, Oregon, particularly the experience of growing up black in a predominantly white area, as well as his early education and religious upbringing. He talks about the importance of role models for young African Americans, citing Multnomah County sheriff Don E. Clark as one of his own. He speaks at length about family and social values. He talks briefly about his college education; meeting his wife, Shirlene Peacher, and starting a family; and getting started in his law enforcement career. He discusses serving as a deputy Multnomah County sheriff and the discrimination he faced there. He then talks about serving as a U.S. marshal, the duties of the marshals, and the political process of his appointment to deputy U.S. marshal for the District of Oregon. He describes the popular perception of the U.S. marshals versus the reality; the process of prisoner transportation; and his thoughts on police brutality and the recent Rodney King video. He closes the interview by discussing the prison system, including its funding and effectiveness at rehabilitation.

Bagley, Kernan H., 1936-

Oral history interview with Charles E. Wright

This oral history interview with Charles E. Wright was conducted by Karen J. Park in the offices of Bullivant, Houser, and Bailey in Portland, Oregon, from April 29 to July 1, 1993. In this interview, Wright discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his education, memories of World War I, social life, and working at First National Bank. He then discusses attending Yale, including his part-time jobs, his favorite subjects, and social life during Prohibition. He goes on to talk about attending Yale Law School. He describes some of his professors, including William O. Douglas, as well as some of his classmates. He talks about returning to Portland in 1933 and practicing law at Platt, Platt, Fales, Smith & Black, then later with the Bullivant firm in 1943. He describes the lawyers he worked with at the firms. He also talks about his marriage to Elisabeth Knowlton Strong and starting a family. He discusses working for the Securities and Exchange Commission in Seattle, Washington, from 1937 to 1943, including his frustration at the lenient sentences handed down for white-collar crimes. He also reflects on going to high school with Gus Solomon and on Solomon's later judicial career; passing the Oregon bar; and his involvement with the Portland Art Association. He speaks at length about practicing law at the Bullivant firm in Portland, including his clients, the firm's growth, and his interest in probate law. He also briefly talks about his feelings about the greater number of women practicing law since the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s. He closes the interview by talking about his children and grandchildren, and his plans for the future.

Wright, Charles E. (Charles Edward Pares), 1906-1999

Oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave

This oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave was conducted by Timothy J. Coleman on November 26, 1993. In this interview, Cosgrave discusses his family background and early life in Calaveras County, California, including his education, childhood games, and the experience of being the son of the county sheriff. He the talks about moving to the San Francisco Bay Area and attending high school. He briefly discusses coming to Oregon and getting interested in the law.

Cosgrave, Walter J. (Walter John), 1910-1999

Oral history interview with Velma J. Jeremiah

This oral history interview with Velma J. Jeremiah was conducted by Youlee Yim You from February 19 to 26, 1994, and in 2006. In this interview, Jeremiah discusses her family background and early life in Eugene and Oregon City, Oregon, including her education and her memories of the Depression. She then talks about studying architecture at the University of Oregon from 1939 to 1940, and again briefly in 1941, as well as her dire financial situation. She describes her memories of World War II, including working at army camps in California, and rationing. She also talks about her marriage to Neil Jeremiah and living in Seattle, Washington, while he served in the Navy during World War II; starting an ill-fated business in San Francisco, California; and returning to Seattle after the war. She discusses Neil's teaching career, her own jobs, and their divorce in 1963.

Jeremiah discusses her decision to go to law school at the Northwestern College of Law in Portland. She then describes practicing law at Davies, Biggs, Strayer, Stoel & Boley, the firm now known as Stoel Rives, from 1975 to 1986, including some of the cases she tried, other women attorneys, and her retirement. She also discusses her involvement with the Oregon Bar Association, the Multnomah Bar Association, and the Queen's Bench. She briefly talks about some of the discrimination women faced in the law profession. She talks about her activities during her retirement, including travel, involvement with Mensa, and stand-up comedy. She also talks about jury duty; her son and his family; and playing piano.

In the second part of this interview, conducted on June 30, 2006, Jeremiah revisits some of the topics discussed earlier in 1994. She talks about taking the bar exam in 1968; professors at Northwestern College of Law; and the difficulties she faced trying to find a job as a woman lawyer. She then talks about working at Stoel Rives. She relates a few anecdotes about how women clients were sometimes treated by her male colleagues. She describes a typical workday at the law firm; early dress codes for women; and the partners of the firm. She talks about the support women lawyers in the firm gave to each other. She also discusses organizations she's been involved in, including NARAL, Planned Parenthood, and Mensa. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement with her condominium association.

Jeremiah, Velma J. (Velma Julia), 1921-2017

Oral history interview with Robert A. Leedy

This oral history interview with Robert A. Leedy was conducted by Anna J. Brown and Katherine H. O'Neil at Leedy's home in Milwaukie, Oregon, from September 10 to October 1, 1994. In this interview, Leedy discusses his family background and early life in the rural areas around Portland, Oregon, including his education and the family farm. He then discusses studying law at the University of Oregon, including his social life and working in a can factory to pay tuition. He also describes some of the members of his graduating class, including Otto Frohnmayer. He talks about getting started in law practice in Portland, including some of the lawyers he worked with and cases he was involved in. He also speaks at length about his interest in golf and how it led to his becoming a U.S. commissioner for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He briefly discusses forming the law firm of Barzee, Leedy & Keene. He describes the duties and procedures of the U.S. District Court of Oregon commissioner, as well as some of the judges he worked with, particularly Judge James Alger Fee. He speaks at length about the bail process and several of the cases he heard. He then discusses his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, including administering the bar exam in the 1940s, and serving as president in the 1950s. He speaks at length about his children, their families, and their careers. He also describes in great detail several European trips he took, beginning in the 1950s, as well as trips to Hawaii and to Death Valley, California. He discusses his involvement with the Episcopal Church. He goes on to talk about some of the cases he worked on in private law practice, as well as the lawyers he's worked with. He closes the interview by discussing some of the changes in the law profession over the years.

Leedy, Robert A., Sr. (Robert Allan), 1909-2001

Oral history interview with Owen Panner

This oral history interview with Owen Panner was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Panner's chambers in Portland, Oregon, from November 24, 1994, to June 1, 1995. In this interview, Panner discusses his family background and early life in rural Oklahoma, including his experiences during the Depression and the Dust Bowl, and his interest in playing golf. He also discusses the racism he observed during his childhood. Panner then talks about attending the University of Oklahoma and his service in the Army during World War II, including meeting his first wife, Agnes Gilbert, and moving to New York at the end of his service. He then discusses returning to the University of Oklahoma and studying law. Panner describes moving to Oregon and practicing law in Bend from 1950 to 1979, including his impressions of the area and people, and several cases he tried during his law career. He speaks at length about representing the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, particularly on cases regarding fishing rights at Celilo Falls, the development of Kah-Nee-Ta, and the termination of the Klamath tribe. Panner discusses national political events such as the Vietnam War, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and the Nixon administration, as well as local politics in Bend, including the divorce of Oregon State Representative Al Ullman. Panner then describes his experience as a judge on the U.S. District Court in Portland from 1980 to 2018, including cases on civil rights, federal power, financial regulations, electrical utilities, and Tonya Harding. He also discusses the O.J. Simpson trial, mandatory sentencing, and the war on drugs. Panner discusses working with judges Otto Skopil, Robert Belloni, Gus Solomon, Jim Redden, and Edward Leavy. He also describes the relationship between the District Court and the Court of Appeals; the law system on the Warm Springs Reservation; and the day-to-day workings of the District Court. Panner closes the interview by discussing the modernization of the courts and his life outside the courtroom.

Panner, Owen Murphy, 1924-

Oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab

This oral history interview with Herbert M. Schwab was conducted by John C. Beatty on January 17, 1994. In this interview, Schwab discusses his early life in Portland, Oregon. He discusses his early jobs and attending Northwestern College of Law. He also talks about his service in the U.S. Army Reserves in India during World War II under General George E. Stratemeyer. He then talks about practicing law in Portland from 1947 to 1959. He briefly discusses his other activities during that time, including serving on the Portland School Board. He talks about serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He briefly describes his fellow judges. He goes on to talk about his activities since his retirement in 1980, including serving on the Northwest Power Planning Council and as mayor of Cannon Beach. He closes the interview by talking about Governor Bob Straub, Monroe Sweetland, Dorothy McCullough Lee and Dick Neuberger.

Schwab, Herbert M., 1915-2005

Oral history interview with James A. Redden

This oral history interview with James A. Redden was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Redden's chambers at the U.S. District courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from November 30, 1994, to January 14, 2002. The audio is incomplete; Tape 27 is missing as of 2015.

In this interview, Redden discusses his family background and early life in Massachusetts, including his memories of the Depression. He then talks about his Army service in the Pacific theater during World War II. He discusses his college experience at the Boston University College of Business Administration and the Boston College Law School, including his social life, his professors, and the evolution of his political views. He also talks about his marriage to Joan Johnson; his jobs after law school; and relocating to Oregon. He discusses practicing law in Medford, including some of the cases he tried and judges he argued before. He then talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, including serving as central committee chair and his involvement in Oregon campaigns, particularly the 1960 Democratic presidential primary.

Redden discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1962 to 1969. He describes each legislative session, including his campaigns; legislation that came up, including on pollution, insurance, electrical utilities, and taxes; and his fellow legislators, including Clarence Barton, Monte Montgomery, and Berkeley Lent. He also talks about balancing his legislative duties with his law practice and family life; working with lobbyists; and national politics contemporary to the interview in 1995. He also talks about the passage of the Beach Bill in 1967; his experience as a delegate to the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois; and his 1972 campaign for Oregon treasurer. He discusses serving as state treasurer from 1972 to 1976, including his duties and accomplishments. He then discusses serving as Oregon attorney general from 1977 to 1980, including his campaign and cases he prosecuted, particularly on Native American fishing rights.

Redden discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1980 to 1995. He describes his appointment by President Jimmy Carter. He talks about his fellow judges, including Helen Frye and Owen Panner; the procedures of the court, particularly scheduling and the role of magistrate judges; and lawyers that argued before him. He discusses the selection and role of juries in federal court, as well as the increasing politicization of judicial appointments. He speaks at length about his role in and the background of The United States v. Loudhawk and the American Indian Movement. He closes the interview by discussing cases he heard regarding the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in the late 1990s, and talking about his children, their careers, and their families.

Redden, James A.

Oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen

This oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen was conducted by Susan C. Glen from April 22 to June 10, 1995. In this interview, Bratzel Kremen discusses her family background and early life in Mulino, Gresham, Silverton and Salem, Oregon, including facing anti-German sentiment during World War I, working on the family orchard, and her education. She discusses the limited career opportunities open to women, her decision to pursue work as a secretary in law offices, and working as a court reporter. She then talks about attending Northwestern College of Law (which later became a part of Lewis & Clark College) at age 37, including her professors, her women classmates, and working full time as a court reporter while studying. She also describes serving as a court reporter for Judge James T. Brown at the Nuremberg Trials in 1947, as well as her travels around post-war Europe. She talks about her first race for the office of Marion County district attorney in 1951. She discusses practicing law in Salem, including representing mothers in custody cases. She then discusses her service as Marion County district attorney from 1956 to 1964, including cases she prosecuted and the long hours she kept. She briefly talks about her marriage to Leonard Kremen, as well as his family background and early life. She then discusses her return to private practice in 1964 and focusing largely on probate law. She closes the interview by talking about her travels.

Kremen, Hattie Bratzel, 1908-1996

Oral history interview with Jack G. Collins

This oral history interview with Jack G. Collins was conducted by Bruce James on August 15, 1996. Additional interview sessions were planned, but were never conducted. In this interview, Collins discusses coming to Oregon in 1958 to become a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice Water Perry; studying for the Oregon bar exam; and working with Bob Packwood. He then speaks at length about his family background and early life in Waukegan, Illinois, including his education. He discusses his involvement with the Presbyterian Church; some of the cases he worked on as a lawyer in Salem, Oregon; and attending Princeton University while serving in the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps. He closes the interview by talking briefly about his naval service during the Korean War.

Collins, Jack G. (Jack Gore), 1930-2010

Oral history interview with Jack G. Collins

This oral history interview with Jack G. Collins was conducted by Sarah Ryan in 1998. In this interview, Collins discusses his family background and early life in Waukegan, Illinois, including working at the town's sewage treatment plant. He also discusses the family background of his wife, Janine Decker. He then discusses attending Princeton University, particularly his experiences in the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps. He also talks about serving in the Navy during the Korean War after graduation, from 1952 to 1954. He describes his and Janine Decker's courtship and later marriage. He speaks briefly about attending Harvard Law School. He then talks about relocating to Oregon, passing the Oregon bar, and working as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice Walter Perry. He describes his fellow law clerks, as well as working on a draft of the Oregon Post-Conviction Hearing Act. He describes the careers of many of the lawyers he's known while in private law practice in Oregon. He also speaks at length about the kinds of cases he tried, including Revolutionary War land scrip cases.

Collins discusses his admiration for John F. Kennedy and becoming an assistant U.S. attorney in 1963. He talks about working under U.S. Attorney Sidney Lezak. He also discusses his family, salary, and living situation during this time period. He briefly shares his memories of the 1962 Columbus Day storm and the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. He talks about some of the cases he prosecuted, including cases on maritime matters and mail fraud. He describes becoming first assistant U.S. attorney and how his duties changed. He talks about cases he worked on as first assistant, including regarding foreclosures and urban renewal, pornography, and the environment. He speaks at length about protests against the Vietnam War and during the civil rights movement, and how the U.S. attorney's office handled related cases. He also talks about the planning of the Vortex music festival in 1970; the FBI investigation of Dan Cooper (also known as D.B. Cooper) and the hijacking of Flight 305 in 1971; and the bombing of the Bonneville towers by a man calling himself "Jayhawker" in 1974. He describes his secretaries. He talks about white-collar crime, civil rights enforcement, and the use of blue boxes for wire fraud. He also discusses Rajneeshpuram and several of the cases related to the activities of the Rajneeshees. He talks about the War on Drugs, which was ramped up under the George H.W. Bush administration, and some of the related cases he worked on. He describes fighting and investigating wildfires; his dealings with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council; and civil forfeiture. He also discusses Native American fishing rights.

Collins discusses his retirement in 1995, including his retirement party. He talks further about Janine, her career as a librarian, and her later diagnosis with Cushing's Disease. He then talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He talks about teaching administrative law at Lewis and Clark College and Portland State University, his involvement with the Korean United Presbyterian Church, and his stance on the legalization of marijuana. He closes the interview by reflecting on the changes in the way the U.S. attorney's office operates, his most difficult cases, and his admiration for some of the people he's worked with.

Collins, Jack G. (Jack Gore), 1930-2010

Oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus

This oral history interview with Helen F. Althaus was conducted by Mary Ellen Page Farr in Ashland, Oregon, from March 13, 1999, to February 19, 2000. In this interview, Althaus discusses her family background, particularly her family's history of civil rights activism, and her early life on a farm in Troutdale, Oregon, including her education, her interest in science, and her social life. She discusses her experiences as law clerk for Judge James Alger Fee, from 1947 to 1949. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, with the law firm King Miller, now known as Miller Nash, from 1953 to 1970, including some of the cases she argued and other women lawyers she worked with. She closes the interview by briefly discussing her work as deputy city attorney for Portland from 1949 to 1953.

Althaus, Helen F.

Oral history interview with Frederick H. Torp

This oral history interview with Frederick H. Torp was conducted by Brian Booth in the offices of Tonkon Torp LLC in Portland, Oregon, on December 28, 1998. In this interview, Torp discusses his family background and early life in New Jersey. He talks about attending Columbia College in New York City, including his family's financial difficulties during the Depression. He briefly discusses practicing law in New York before the advent of World War II. Torp then discusses his service in the Navy from 1942 to 1945, including acting as a lawyer in courts martial, and fighting in the Pacific Theater. He talks about joining the law firm of Hart Spencer, now known as Stoel Rives, in Portland, Oregon, in 1945, including the lawyers he worked with and his clients. He also talks about the 1954 termination of federal recognition of the Klamath Tribes and his involvement in some of the legal aspects of the termination. He discusses starting the law firm Tonkon Torp in 1974, including the lawyers he worked with. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers; his involvement with the Episcopal Church and other organizations; and his colleagues at the Hart Spencer firm. He closes the interview by talking about some of the judges on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, including Gus Solomon and James Alger Fee.

Torp, Frederick H., 1913-2003

Oral history interview with Jerome Kohlberg, Jr.

This oral history interview with Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at the St. Regis Hotel in New York, New York, from May 19-20, 1999. In this interview, Kohlberg discusses his experiences as a law clerk for Judge Gus Solomon from 1952 to 1953, including some of the cases Solomon heard, and Solomon's commitment to helping Jewish lawyers. He also briefly describes many of the lawyers and judges he met while in Portland, Oregon. He then talks about returning to New York to practice law and his continued relationship with Gus Solomon and Libby Solomon. He speaks at length about purchasing Fred Meyer in 1981 through his investment firm, Kohlberg, Kravis, Roberts (KKR & Co.), including his interactions with Fred G. Meyer, Oran B. Robertson, and Gerry Pratt. He closes the interview by briefly discussing how KKR has continued to manage Fred Meyer since its purchase.

Kohlberg, Jerome, Jr., 1925-2015

Oral history interview with Erskine B. Wood

This oral history interview with Erskine B. Wood was conducted by David Jacobson at Wood's home in Vancouver, Washington, on May 6, 1999. In this interview, Wood briefly discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including fishing on the Columbia River, as well as his education at a boarding school in California. He then discusses his experiences at Harvard College and at Harvard Law School. He talks about his interest in admiralty law, as well as the admiralty law career of his grandfather, C.E.S. Wood. He then discusses how World War II affected his law practice, as well as some of the cases he worked on, and some of the judges he argued before. He talks about his children and his service in the Navy during World War II. He closes the interview by discussing the changes in Oregon and his hopes for the state's future.

Wood, Erskine B. (Erskine Biddle), 1911-2001

Oral history interview with Thomas Cooney

This oral history interview with Thomas Cooney was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from October 17 to November 2, 2000. In this interview, Cooney discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his interest in drama and golf, and his memories of World War II. He then discusses attending the University of Portland, including being a cheerleader. He also briefly discusses his service in the Air Force during the Korean War. He relates several unfortunate incidents involving a pogo stick. He describes studying law at Willamette University, including his social life. He then talks about raising a family and coaching his son's basketball team. He describes getting started in law practice in Portland, Oregon, at MacGuire, Shields, Morrison, and Bailey, including several of the cases he tried. He then speaks at length about representing the Oregon Medical Association while a partner at Cooney & Crew and several of the malpractice suits he tried. He also relates several anecdotes about his life and being a lawyer.

Cooney, Thomas E., 1931-2015

Oral history interview with Katherine Huff O'Neil

This oral history interview with Katherine Huff O'Neil was conducted by Patricia Wlodarczyk from November 3, 2000, to May 9, 2001. At O'Neil's request, sections of sessions 2 and 3 of the interview were redacted by the U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society and the Oregon Historical Society. In addition to the audio recording and transcript of the interview, the collection includes a digital photograph album in PDF format containing images of O'Neil's family, friends, and colleagues. All but two of the digital photographs used to create the album are also included in the collection as individual images.

In this interview, O'Neil discusses her family background and early life in New Orleans, Louisiana, including her early education, family vacations, and race relations in the South. She talks about studying political science at Stanford University, including her social life and her year studying abroad at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. She then briefly discusses her involvement with the Republican Party and working for the Young Republicans in Washington, D.C. She talks about studying law at Harvard University, including her experience as a female student, as well as meeting Mike O'Neil and their subsequent marriage. She talks about raising a family; relocating to Tigard, Oregon, in 1964; and working as a correspondent for the Community Press and the Oregonian newspaper. She discusses studying law at Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College, including her fellow law students.

O'Neil discusses practicing law in Portland. She talks about her first job with a law firm and sexist attitudes she faced as a woman lawyer, as well as racist attitudes she observed in her fellow lawyers. She talks about her fellow lawyers, judges she argued before, and some of the cases she worked on, particularly regarding admiralty law. She describes each of the law firms she worked for during her career. She also talks about trips to China in 1983 and 1985; her involvement in the formation of Oregon Women Lawyers; and serving as a pro-tem judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court. She discusses her plans for retirement; her children and their careers and their families; and serving on the American Bar Association House of Delegates. She also speaks about her involvement with the Oregon Bar Association. She talks about changes in the law profession and her role in the investigation of U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. O'Neil closes the interview by discussing people who influenced her to pursue a career as a lawyer.

O'Neil, Katherine Huff, 1938-

Oral history interview with Selma J. Denecke

This oral history interview with Selma J. Denecke was conducted by Elizabeth Meyer at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from March 17 to June 23, 1999. In this interview, Denecke discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including her early education and her memories of the Depression. She also talks about her interest in art and music and attending Scripps College in Claremont, California. She talks about working at the Portland Art Museum during World War II. She discusses meeting Arno H. Denecke and their subsequent marriage. Denecke describes Arno Denecke's service in the U.S. Army in Europe during World War II, as well as their long-distance courtship. She talks about Arno Denecke's career from professor at the University of Oregon Law School to chief justice of the Oregon Supreme Court. She discusses raising a family, as well as the prenatal and maternity care she received.

Denecke, Selma J. (Selma Jane), 1919-2009

Oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold

This oral history interview with Barrie J. Herbold was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from September 19-26, 2001. In this interview, Herbold discusses her family background and early life, including moving around often due to her father's Navy career. She speaks briefly about attending the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oregon Law School, and about the sexism women college students faced. She talks about practicing law in Portland, Oregon, including her experience as the first woman trial attorney at the Dusendorf, Spears, Lubersky law firm. She describes starting a law firm with Dave Markowitz, the lawyers she hired, and cases she handled.

Herbold, Barrie J. (Barrie Jane), 1949-2001

Oral history interview with John E. Jaqua

This oral history interview with John E. Jaqua was conducted by Donald W. Brodie at the law offices of Jaqua and Wheatley in Eugene, Oregon, from October 5 to November 1, 2000. In this interview, Jaqua discusses his service as a Marine in the Pacific theater during World War II; attending Pomona College and the University of Oregon Law School; and beginning the practice of law in Eugene. He talks about cases he handled, judges he argued before, and his involvement with the Oregon Bar Association. He also talks about running a cattle ranch in Springfield, Oregon. He discusses some of the clients he represented. He speaks at length about his involvement with Nike Inc., including serving on the board, helping to set up factories in Japan, and his friendship with Nike cofounder Bill Bowerman. He also talks about his involvement with the University of Oregon Capital Campaign to construct a new building for the law school. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities and his memories of lawyer and University of Oregon Law School dean Orlando Hollis.

Jaqua, John E. (John Evans), 1920-2009

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye

This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from January 9 to May 20, 2002. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon. She talks about her mother and brother contracting tuberculosis; how she was raised by her grandparents; and her early education. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including her professors; her involvement in student government and politics in general; and meeting Bill Frye and their subsequent marriage. She talks about teaching high school in Eugene, raising a family, and returning to the University of Oregon to study law.

Frye briefly discusses practicing law in Eugene and specializing in adoption. She talks about serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall. She also discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court, including her appointment by President Jimmy Carter. She talks about the cases she heard; judges she served with; and court procedure. She discusses sentencing; the role of dissent in lower courts; and the role of juries. She closes the interview by discussing her legal philosophy and how her opinions have evolved over the years.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Oral history interview with Carl Burnham, Jr.

This oral history interview with Carl Burnham, Jr. was conducted by Timothy J. Helfrich at Black Butte Ranch, Oregon, on June 21, 2002. In this interview, Burnham discusses coming to Ontario, Oregon, in 1964 to practice law at Yturri, O'Keefe, and Cox. He describes many of the judges and lawyers in Malheur County, as well as some cases he handled.

Burnham, Carl Von Hoffman, Jr., 1939-

Oral history interview with Noreen Saltveit McGraw

This oral history interview with Noreen Saltveit McGraw was conducted by S. Diane Rynerson from May 24 to July 31, 2000. In this interview, McGraw discusses practicing law in Medford, Oregon, with her father, Edward Cantwell Kelly; about trying to find a job with a different law firm and the overt sexism she faced; and about working as an assistant Oregon attorney general in Portland under Robert Y. Thornton. She discusses some of the cases she tried, including on worker compensation. She then tells the story of defending the D'Autremont brothers in a train robbery case. She talks about practicing law while raising children; about arguing cases before U.S. District Court judges Gus Solomon and Robert Belloni; and about cases she argued in Spanish, particularly cases regarding migrant worker rights. She then talks about other women lawyers and the difficulty they had breaking into the legal profession, as well as women's legal organizations in Oregon. She also talks about living in Mexico with her husband, Carl Saltveit, and their children, as well as studying Spanish at Portland State University during the Vietnam War. She describes her involvement in Robert F. Kennedy's campaign for the Democratic nomination for president in 1968. McGraw talks briefly about serving as a district judge pro tempore from 1972 to 1976. She discusses the increase in women entering the legal profession, particularly the number of women entering law school later in their lives; her pro-bono work for Legal Aid; and working as a criminal trial lawyer. She talks about many of the cases she worked on, including one regarding the Mount Hood Freeway. She then speaks about serving as city judge for Medford in the 1950s and appearing on the TV show "What's My Line?" She closes the interview by discussing her experience in law school and a trip she took to Europe while awaiting her bar exam results.

McGraw, Noreen Saltveit, 1934-

Oral history interview with Randall B. Kester

This oral history interview with Randall B. Kester was conducted by Tom B. Stoel, Jr. at Kester's office in Portland, Oregon, from April 2-14, 1992. Throughout the interview, supplemental items are referenced. These items are part of the related U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society Collection, Coll 560.

In this interview, Kester discusses his family background and early life in Bloomington, Wisconsin, and in Ontario, Oregon. He talks about attending Willamette University during the Depression, including his social life, some of his professors, and his involvement in student government. He then talks about attending the Columbia University Law School in New York, including some of his classes and professors. He discusses returning to Oregon to practice law in Portland, including taking the Oregon bar exam. He talks about his marriage to Rachael Woodhouse and describes the law firm of Maguire, Shields & Morrison. He talks about arguing cases in the U.S. District Court of Oregon, particularly before Judge James Alger Fee. He also describes some of the cases he handled.

While Kester does not discuss his time as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1957 to 1958, an incomplete transcript of the interview contains a brief description of that period of his life.

Kester discusses serving as general solicitor for the Union Pacific Railroad from 1958 to 1979. He talks about some of the cases he handled for the company, including the acquisition of the Portland Traction Company. He also discusses other cases he handled, including his involvement in Yasui v. United States. He also talks about judges he argued before, including Hall Lusk and Claude McColloch. He talks about his involvement with various Oregon Bar committees and other civic organizations. He also talks about his involvement with the Mazamas and his other outdoor activities. He closes the interview by speaking again about his work as general solicitor for Union Pacific.

Kester, Randall B., 1916-2012

Oral history interview with George M. Joseph

This oral history interview with George M. Joseph was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Joseph's home in Portland, Oregon, from August 7 to November 7, 2001, and on February 25, 2002. The portion of the interview recorded on February 25, 2002, was conducted at the Friendship Health Center in Portland, where Joseph was recovering from a broken leg. The first tape of this 27-tape interview features a brief overview of Joseph's entire life and career.

Beginning from Tape 2 of this interview, Joseph discusses his family background and early life in Boise, Idaho, including a store his mother ran in Boise, and the early death of his father from tuberculosis of the bone. He also describes a 1938 visit from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Boise; his awareness of the Depression; the Mormon community in Boise; and his family's own Catholicism. He also speaks about contracting polio as a child and the lifelong physical issues it caused, as well as his memories of the internment of Japanese-Americans and other events during World War II. He then discusses his education, including attending Menlo School in Atherton, California, and Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) in Boise, Idaho; hitchhiking home; and his social life. He also discusses attending the University of San Francisco and Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political views. He speaks at length about a recurrence of polio during his senior year at Reed and the extensive treatment and physical therapy he undertook as a result. He then talks about studying law at the University of Chicago, including his divorce from his first wife, Elizabeth Kalisher, and his subsequent marriage to Elizabeth Starr, as well as coming to the realization that he did not want to be a lawyer. He describes Elizabeth Starr's family background and early life, as well as their wedding and honeymoon. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, particularly acting as an alternate delegate for the 1956 Democratic National Convention.

Joseph discusses his return to Oregon in 1955 and his early legal career as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice George Rossman. He briefly describes the judges on the Oregon Supreme Court at that time, as well as some of the cases Rossman presided over. He discusses teaching law at many different universities outside Oregon, including Ohio Northern University. He then describes working in the Multnomah County district attorney's office under George Van Hoomisen, as well as his ambitions of becoming a judge. He talks about several cases he prosecuted and making a name for himself as a criminal appellate prosecutor; the focus of the district attorney's office on vice cases, including an undercover operation that Joseph compromised; and civil rights cases he was involved with, particularly involving the people with mental illnesses. He talks about the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals and the subsequent increase in the workload of the district attorney's office; Jacob B. Tanzer and other county-level judges; and his relationship with Multnomah County sheriff, and later Multnomah County commissioner, Don E. Clark. He then talks about his brief career as a lawyer in various private law firms in Portland, his involvement in the passage of the Multnomah County Home Rule Charter, and his ongoing attempts to become a judge. He speaks at length about Multnomah County politics and Don Clark's accomplishments as county commissioner. He talks about serving as Multnomah County counsel, including working on public power and city-county consolidation. He also discusses briefly teaching at Lewis & Clark College.

Joseph next discusses serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1992. He describes the other judges on the court, including Robert Y. Thornton, Herbert M. Schwab, Betty Roberts, Jason D. Lee and William L. Richardson. He talks about writing opinions, the types of cases he heard, and his staff. He also describes the procedures and operating practices of the court. He shares his observations on the changes in the Oregon Supreme Court since the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1981 to 1992. He closes the interview by discussing his service on the Board of Bar Examiners and his involvement in the creation of a uniform bar exam, as well as reforms that have been made to the Oregon court system.

Joseph, George Manley, 1930-2003

Oral history interview with Ralph F. Cobb

This oral history interview with Ralph F. Cobb was conducted by Donald W. Brodie in Cobb's office in Eugene, Oregon, in October 2000. In this interview, Cobb discusses the circumstances of his adoption; talks about attending Yankton College and the University of South Dakota; and describes his Army service during World War II. He then discusses moving to Oregon, passing the Oregon bar exam, and practicing law in Eugene. He talks about cases he handled, judges he argued before, and his involvement with the Oregon Bar Association. He also talks about his more recent work as a mediator, his interest in track and field, and how Eugene has changed during his lifetime. He closes the interview by discussing the technological changes in the legal profession.

Cobb, Ralph F. (Ralph Fallon), 1921-2015

Oral history interview with Don H. Marmaduke

This oral history interview with Don H. Marmaduke was conducted by Brian G. Booth in the offices of the Tonkon Torp law firm in Portland, Oregon, on December 6, 2002. In this interview, Marmaduke discusses his family background and early life in Portland. He talks about his college experiences at Yale University and Harvard Law School in the 1940s, and describes his social life, as well as some of his professors and fellow students. He talks about his marriage to Mary Ellen Dandy and about working as a law clerk in Boston, Massachusetts. He discusses his 1952 move back to Portland, and practicing law with the firm now known as Stoel Rives. He discusses some of the lawyers he worked with, clients he represented, and some of his pro bono work, including in Mississippi as a civil rights lawyer in the 1960s. He discusses leaving Stoel Rives in 1971 to form his own law firm, and joining Tonkon Torp in 1974. He talks about cases he handled, including cases regarding antitrust and intellectual property law. He closes the interview by talking about awards he's won and his plans for the future.

Marmaduke, Don H. (Don Hall), 1926-2019

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