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Finley, Irene
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Trip to Alaska, 1926

Field notes, correspondence, and article drafts discussing animals, people, and landscape observed on the Finleys' trip to the Bering Sea and Pribilof Islands in Alaska.

Finley, Irene

Trip to Alaska, 1926

Field notes from the Finleys' trip to the Pribilof Islands in Alaska. Included are drafts of Irene Finley's articles, "Off to Aleut land", "Lucy", and "Cuffy and Tuffy."

Finley, Irene

Trip to eastern United States, 1927-1928

Overview of William and Irene Finley's trip to the eastern United States, including Finley's recent publication, "Wild Animal Pets", release of a film series, "Finley Nature Series", and series of lectures, "Camera Hunting on the Continental Divide" and "Cruising in B.C. and Alaska."

Finley, Irene

Lower Klamath Lake, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake Refuges, 1917-1935

Correspondence, reports, and articles discussing the impact of agriculture and reclamation projects on the Lower Klamath, Tule Lake, and Clear Lake Refuges. Topics of focus include the impacts of grazing on bird refuges, construction of dikes and dams on the Klamath and Link Rivers, and possible reflooding of portions of the Lower Klamath Lake.

Finley, Irene

William L. Finley Papers, 1899-1946

  • MSS Finley
  • Collection
  • 1899 - 1946

William L. Finley's papers primarily document his work as a wildlife conservationist, author, lecturer, photographer, and filmmaker from about 1900 to 1940. The collection also documents the work his wife Irene Finley and photography partner Herman Bohlman. The collection consists of published and unpublished manuscripts, lecture and field notes, reports, correspondence, photographs and motion picture films.

An addition to the collection (Accession 2014:062) is made up of correspondence and newspaper clippings documenting the wildlife conservation work of William and Irene Finley. Among the topics addressed in the correspondence include: song bird protection laws in Oregon, requests to Finley for use of his photographs, the forming of an Oregon Fish and Game Commission, biological surveys conducted by Finley, legislation in California repealing meadowlark protection, and letters by Finley to various organizations regarding the presentation of one of his lectures. A highlight among the correspondence is a thank you letter from Finley to President Theodore Roosevelt for his establishment of wild bird reservations. The clippings are newspaper articles written by Irene and William Finley about encounters with wildlife, nocturnal bird sounds, and their filming of wildlife at Paulina Lake. The four articles all appeared in editions of the "Oregon Sunday Journal."

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Series 1: Manuscripts, circa 1910-1942

This series consists of typewritten and handwritten manuscripts of newspaper and magazine articles, books, lecture notes, circa 1910-1942. Some were submitted to publications such as Pacific Monthly, Sunset Magazine, Century and Nature Magazine. Many describe particular species of birds. Authors include William L. Finley, Irene Finley, Phoebe Finley, Kenneth Reid, and Ed Averill.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Towhee, the shy garden songster

Manuscript that contains excerpts from "The towhees, window friends." The document describes several of the different species of towhees, including their diet, physical appearance, and where they can be found.

Finley, Irene

Birds' winter beds

Manuscript in which the author offers her observations on three types of birds she has noticed as winter has arrived, including a woodpecker, bluebird, and geese.

Finley, Irene

Do not feed the bears

Manuscript containing excerpts from "The bear and the boob." The document contains additional tales of interactions between people and bears at Yellowstone National Park.

Finley, Irene

Robin

Manuscript describing a young robin who ventured out of the nest. Upon the realization that life was not as easy as his parents made it seem, the bird called out to the parents. The mother responded and attended to his needs but he would not return with her to the nest. The father attempted but gave up. Eventually the bird had to learn for himself because the mother would be occupied with a new brood.

Finley, Irene

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