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Frank M. Hawks landing plane in Portland for refueling

Photograph of Captain Frank M. Hawks landing his Texaco airplane at Swan Island airport in Portland on Saturday, January 23, 1932. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N1082 and 371N4992, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 24, 1932. The photographs were published under the headline “Speed King Refuels Here on Flight.” This photograph had the following caption: “The low wing monoplane piloted by Captain Frank M. Hawks as it landed at Swan Island at 12:23 p.m. Saturday while the noted aviator was speeding southward to Augua [sic] Caliente in an effort to set a new record round trip from Mexico to Canada.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Hawks Sets Record for 2-Way Dash.” According to the story, Hawks set a new round-trip speed record of 13 hours, 43 minutes, 59 seconds.

Kiutus Tecumseh and his father next to plane at Swan Island airport

Photograph of Kiutus Tecumseh (right) and his father, also Kiutus Tecumseh, standing next to a Hans Mirow Flying Service airplane at Swan Island airport in Portland on August 10, 1930. The younger Tecumseh is wearing a feather headdress and a beaded vest, gloves, and pants. He is holding a hatchet. The elder Tecumseh is wearing a cowboy hat, a collared shirt, a beaded vest and gloves, and breeches. On Monday, August 11, 1930, the Oregon Journal published a brief story about the two men on Page 11, under the headline “Two Indian Chiefs Tour Sky Lanes in Portland Airplane.” The Journal reported that the younger Kiutus Tecumseh, a singer, was on his fourth radio concert tour, and that he and his father had taken a flight with the Mirow service during a stop in Portland. The younger Tecumseh resided in Wenatchee, Washington, and the elder in Yakima, Washington, according to the story.

U. S. Navy dirigible Akron over Portland

Aerial photograph of the United States Navy dirigible Akron in flight above Portland on May 24, 1932. On that day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the Akron’s visit and published image No. 371N5036, a similar photograph to this one, on Page 4. The caption with that image included the following information about the dirigible: “The Akron is 785 feet long, weighs 403,000 pounds, and has 6,300,000 cubic feet gas volume. The ship has eight motors, totaling 4480 horsepower, and can make 83.8 miles an hour at top speed.” Image note: The number 2 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower left corner of the photograph.

U. S. Navy dirigible Akron over Portland

Aerial photograph of the United States Navy dirigible Akron in flight above Portland on May 24, 1932. On that day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the Akron’s visit and published image No. 371N5036, a similar photograph to this one, on Page 4. The caption with that image included the following information about the dirigible: “The Akron is 785 feet long, weighs 403,000 pounds, and has 6,300,000 cubic feet gas volume. The ship has eight motors, totaling 4480 horsepower, and can make 83.8 miles an hour at top speed.” Image note: The number 7 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower left corner of the photograph. Scratches on negative.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of unidentified people looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a similar photograph, image No. 371N3105, and a story about the crash, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a Varney Air Lines mail plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. On December 1, 1929, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the crash, headlined “Mail Pilot Rams Span; Badly Hurt.” A similar photo, image No. 371N3109, was published on Page 2 that day. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the [Interstate] bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Captain John M. Stanley in plane after return to Pearson Field

Photograph of two aviators in a plane outside a hangar at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday, January 7, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, January 8, 1927, under the headline “Here’s Kelly — If Anyone Asks.” The photograph had the following caption: “After losing and finding themselves again while looking for Leslie Brownlee, lost on Mount Hood, Lieutenant Oakley Kelly and Captain John Stanley returned Friday to Vancouver barracks. They were greeted by Motorcycle Patrolmen Regan and Tauscher, who joined in the search for them. Kelly is shown in the front seat of the plane, Stanley behind.” According to an accompanying story, headlined “Kelly Tells of Harrowing Trip; Never Such Fog,” Stanley and Kelly had left on Wednesday, January 5, to conduct an aerial search of Mount Hood for Brownlee, but were caught in a storm and dense fog. They were forced to fly east and land in a field about five miles from Long Creek, in Grant County. According to the story, they spent the night in the field with the plane and walked to get help and fuel the next morning. On their return flight, they were delayed by another storm and spent the night of Thursday, January 6, in Pendleton before continuing to Vancouver on January 7. See related image No. 371N5908. Image note: The text “Kelly + Stanley” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Pilot Tex Rankin holding black cat

Photograph, taken on August 24, 1928, of pilot Tex Rankin holding a black cat he borrowed from a Portland girl, Carol Mangold, to take with him on a national air race from New York to Los Angeles. The cat was one of two “jinxes” that Rankin deliberately adopted for the race; the other was to enter his plane under the number 13. On August 24, the day Rankin departed, the Oregon Journal published a story on Page 2 about the pilot and the cat; the headline was “Rankin and His Jinxes Go East to Start Derby.”See related image Nos. 371N5919, 371N5920, 371N6220, and 371N6222. Also see the following images related to Rankin's return from the race: 371N5921, 371N5922, 371N5923, 371N6141, 371N6150, and 377N0032. Image note: The number 6 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image.

George O. Noville, F. V. Tompkins, and R. S. Allen at air circus on Swan Island, Portland

Portrait of three men standing next to an airplane, possibly a tri-motor Ford-Stout owned by the Standard Oil Company, at Swan Island airport. The plane arrived in Portland on Saturday, June 9, 1928, and was on display at the airport on Sunday, June 10, 1928, during Portland’s second annual air circus. A cropped version of this photograph, along with a picture of the Ford-Stout plane, was published in the Oregon Journal on June 10, 1928, under the headline “Huge Avion Greeted With Acclaim.” This photograph had the following caption: “Lieutenant Commander George Noville, who flew across pole and over Atlantic with [Richard E.] Byrd; F. V. Tompkins, pilot of the giant aircraft, and R. S. Allen, assistant pilot.” In a front-page story that day, the Journal reported that Noville had arrived in Portland on the Ford-Stout plane. See related image Nos. 371N1902, 371N2520, 371N5952. Image note: Double exposure. The text “Novill [sic] — Tompkins ?” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Postmaster John M. Jones before departure for air-mail celebration

Photograph of two men, pilot Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly (left) and Portland Postmaster John M. Jones, seated in Kelly’s airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on April 6, 1926. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 8 of the Oregon Journal that day under the headline “Postmaster Also Goes by Air Mail.” The photograph had the following caption: “John M. Jones, head of Portland’s postoffice, as he appeared early today when he became a passenger with Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly, army flying ace at Vancouver barracks, to join air mail celebration at Pasco. Jones is in rear seat of plane piloted by Kelly.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the inauguration of air-mail service from the Pacific Northwest on a new route between Pasco, Washington, and Elko, Nevada. According to that story, headlined “Northwest’s First Mail Plane Is Off,” Jones and Kelly flew to Pasco on the morning of the first flight on the new route to participate in festivities marking the event. Image note: The text “Okley [sic] G Kelly and Postmaster Jones” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image. See related image No. 371N5910.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Postmaster John M. Jones before departure for air-mail celebration

Photograph of two men, pilot Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly (left) and Portland Postmaster John M. Jones, standing next to Kelly’s airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on April 6, 1926. A similar photograph of the two men, image No. 371N5909, was published on Page 8 of the Oregon Journal that day; it was part of the Journal’s coverage of the inauguration of air-mail service from the Pacific Northwest on a new route between Pasco, Washington, and Elko, Nevada. According to a front-page story, headlined “Northwest’s First Mail Plane Is Off,” Jones and Kelly flew to Pasco on April 6, the morning of the first flight on the new route, to participate in festivities marking the event.

Spectators at air circus, Swan Island, Portland

Photograph of a crowd outdoors behind a cordon. The photograph was probably taken on Sunday, June 10, 1928, at Swan Island airport during Portland’s second annual air circus. Behind the crowd is an airplane with the words “Standard of California” on the side. The plane, a tri-motor Ford-Stout owned by the Standard Oil Company, was on exhibit at Swan Island during the air show, according to a story about the event on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on June 11, 1928. The Journal reported that more than 6,000 people attended the air show, which included stunts, races, parachuting, and a double wedding on a plane. See related image Nos. 371N1902, 371N2516, and 371N2520. Image note: The number 9 is written on the negative and is faintly visible in the lower right corner of the image.

B. C. Tremaine? with Sky Crown and dog, probably at Pacific International Livestock Exposition

Photograph, taken indoors, showing a man standing next to a horse, holding the horse’s reins in one hand, and carrying a dog with his other arm. The man may be B. C. Tremaine of Los Angeles and the horse is Sky Crown. The photograph was probably taken at the 1938 Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland. A photograph of the same man and horse, image No. 374N1184, probably taken on a different day than this image, was published in the Oregon Journal on Saturday, October 8, 1938. Also see related image No. 374N1167, which was probably taken at the same time as this photograph.

Mrs. E. F. Peffer with Belgian horse, Minnie, probably at Pacific International Livestock Exposition

Full-length portrait showing a woman, Mrs. E. F. Peffer of Stockton, California, and a Belgian horse named Minnie standing outside the open door of a stable. Peffer is holding the horse’s halter and looking to the left. The photograph was probably taken in October 1935 at the Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland. The text “Mrs. E. F. Peffer - Minnie - Belgian” is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image. Also see image Nos. 375A0013, 375A0022, 375A0023, and 375A0026.

Belgian horse, Minnie, probably at Pacific International Livestock Exposition

Photograph, taken from the front, showing a Belgian horse outside the open door of a stable. An unidentified man partially outside the frame is holding the horse’s halter. The photograph was probably taken in October 1935 at the Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland. The text “Minnie - Belgian” is written on the negative and is partially visible at the bottom of the negative. Also see image Nos. 375A0013, 375A0022, 375A0023, and 375A0025.

Two unidentified men with Percherons, probably at Pacific International Livestock Exposition

Full-length portrait of two unidentified men outside a building, each holding the halter or lead rope of a Percheron. The photograph was probably taken at the annual Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland. The text “Rubys [sic] Percherons” is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image. See related image No. 375A0011.

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