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Oral history interview with Bill Hedlund

  • SR 1113
  • Collection
  • 1988-06-19

This oral history interview with Bill Hedlund was conducted by Richard McConnell on June 19, 1988. An unidentified woman was also present. In this interview, Hedlund discusses his experience in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1941 to 1942, and his experiences as a lobbyist. He discusses legislators and lobbyists he worked with, rules regarding lobbying activities, his involvement with the Democratic Party, and governors he served under while in the Legislature. He then looks at photographs and discusses them, his family history, and his early life in Portland. He discusses how he got interested in politics after he graduated from law school in 1935, and his jobs before running for the Legislature in 1940, including working for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.

Hedlund, Bill (William Hancock), 1910-1994

Oral history interview with Bill Hedlund

This oral history interview with Bill Hedlund was conducted by Clark Hansen from September 4-25, 1990. In the interview, Hedlund discusses his family history and early life in Portland, Oregon, including notable people that his family knew, such as Oswald West; his memories of World War I; and his early involvement with the Democratic Party. He then discusses his experience during the Depression, and attending the University of Oregon and the Northwestern College of Law. He talks about his early career as a deputy U.S. marshal and on the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. He also discusses practicing law in Portland, then in the U.S. Attorney's office; the evolution of his political outlook; his father's political career; and his experience in the Coast Guard auxiliary during World War II. Hedlund then discusses his term in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1941 to 1942, including his campaign, his staff and office arrangements, and legislation. He then discusses working in the U.S. Attorney's office from 1943 to 1945, after leaving the Legislature. He also talks about his 33 years as a lobbyist, particularly for oil companies, from 1945 to 1977. He discusses issues the oil lobby was concerned with, including oil spills, gas additives, and environmental legislation. He also talks briefly about the plane accident that killed Secretary of State Robert S. Farrell, Jr., Senate President Marshall E. Cornett, and Governor Earl Snell. He discusses governors of Oregon and their staffs, as well as several legislators. He closes the interview by talking about the lobbying profession in more detail, particularly his work for oil companies, and his service as commissioner of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission from 1980 to 1987.

Hedlund, Bill (William Hancock), 1910-1994

Oral history interview with James A. Redden

This oral history interview with James A. Redden was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Redden's chambers at the U.S. District Court in Portland, Oregon, on January 27, 2006. In this interview, Redden discusses cases during his time as Oregon attorney general and as a U.S. District Court judge, including some involving treaties with Native Americans and fishing rights on the Columbia River, as well as the effects of the dams on salmon runs and other fisheries. He also discusses the history and impact of the U.S. District Court Historical Society; the war on terror, particularly the Patriot Act; and drug-related cases.

Redden, James A.

Oral history interview with Becky Johnson

This oral history interview with Elizabeth Johnson was conducted by Rick Harmon and Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from June 25, 1986, to March 31, 1993. In the interview, Johnson discusses her family background and early life in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Bellevue, Ohio, including her family's religious faith, and life under Prohibition and during the Depression. She then discusses attending Miami University, including joining a sorority, her involvement with the YWCA, and the discrimination she saw. She also discusses attending Wellesley College, then teaching English to high school students. Johnson then talks about her experience as a woman in the Navy during World War II, serving with the WAVES, particularly her time stationed in Portland and Astoria, Oregon.

Johnson then discusses, at length, the family background and early life of her husband, Oregon State Representative Sam Johnson. She discusses Sam Johnson's youth and his education in the San Francisco area and in France, as well as his struggle with hereditary gout. She talks about their marriage and settling in Redmond, Oregon, and Sam's career with his family's timber business, including a trip they took to Chile to explore timber opportunities there. She also discusses the S.S. Johnson Foundation.

Johnson goes on to talk about her involvement in Oregon politics, including her involvement with the Oregon Republican Women's organization, campaigning for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and particularly her role on the State Board of Education. She also talks about Sam Johnson's time in the Oregon House of Representatives, his relationship to the changing Republican Party, and legislation he was involved with. She also discusses his time as mayor of Redmond. Johnson closes the interview by talking about her family life.

Johnson, Becky (Elizabeth Avery Hill), 1913-2007

Oral history interview with Donal D. Sullivan

This oral history interview with Donal D. Sullivan was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Sullivan's chambers at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Portland, Oregon, on July 6, 2006. In the interview, Sullivan discusses his early career as a lawyer in Salem, and as assistant district attorney with Sid Lezak in the Multnomah County district attorney's office in Portland, then as a clerk for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He describes working with judges Gus Solomon and William East. Sullivan also talks about serving as a bankruptcy judge. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family.

Sullivan, Donal D. (Donal Dennis), 1931-2009

Oral history interview with Owen Panner

This interview with Owen Panner was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Portland, Oregon, on December 19, 2005. In the interview, Panner discusses mandatory sentencing and the effect of politics on the judiciary. He also talks about his plan to move to the District Court in Medford, Oregon. In addition, he discusses the structure and procedures of the District Court; technology in the courts; his involvement with the U.S. District Court Historical Society; and life on his Medford ranch.

Panner, Owen Murphy, 1924-

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin

This interview with Alfred Goodwin was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Goodwin's home in Sisters, Oregon, on August 26, 2006. In the interview, Goodwin discusses some of the topics that often come before the U.S. District Court, including immigration, fishing rights, and environmental law. He also discusses national legislation regarding terrorism; proposals to split the Ninth Circuit; technology in the court; and the War on Drugs. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family background.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman

This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman's office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London in England; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Oral history interview with Lee Johnson

This oral history interview with Lee Johnson was conducted by Clark Hansen at Johnson's home, as well as his office, in Portland, Oregon, from April 20 to September 29, 1992. In this interview, Johnson discusses his family background and early life in Toledo, Oregon, during the Depression; he likens Toledo to a company town. He talks about moving to Portland at the age of 11, then attending prep school in New Jersey, and Princeton after that. He discusses how his education at Princeton changed his political outlook, and talks about volunteering for the Navy after the Korean War. He then talks about studying law at Stanford, including his interest in antitrust law, his involvement with the Law Review, and starting a family with his wife, Dorothy Marie Miller. He goes on to discuss his brief stint as a trial lawyer for the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., under both the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations, as well as practicing law in Portland. He briefly describes many of the judges before whom he argued cases. He talks about his involvement with the Trumpeters and the Republican Party.

Johnson discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968, including campaigning, advocating for a sales tax, and his views on decriminalizing drugs. He also talks about some of the legislators he served with, including Monte Montgomery and Harry Boivin. He also speaks about Governor Mark Hatfield's administration; reapportionment; and the constitutionality of the Beach Bill. He then discusses serving as attorney general for Oregon from 1969 to 1975, particularly his campaigns. He also discusses some of the cases he prosecuted, his staff, and recruiting lawyers. He also speaks at length about the passage of the Bottle Bill. He discusses working in Governor Tom McCall's administration, as well as Governor Bob Straub's; his rivalry with Clay Myers; and working with George Van Hoomisen. He also talks about his work on cases regarding welfare reforms, particularly to help single mothers; antitrust law; regulation of fisheries; and crime prevention. He speaks often about the working relationship the district attorney's office had with the Oregon Legislature. He also describes his DUI arrest and the resulting trial; the gun control debate; the prison system and capital punishment; and whistleblower protections.

Johnson discusses his partial term as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1978, including his campaigns, the role of the judiciary, and working with juries. He also discusses judges he worked with, including Jacob Tanzer, Jason Lee, Hans Linde and Herb Schwabe. He talks about judicial decisions, including on abortion; procedures of the court; continuing education; the relationship between courts of different levels; and his views on the role of judges. He speaks at length about his time working for the administration of Governor Vic Atiyeh, as well as changes in the Legislature. He then talks about serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court of Appeals from 1983 up to the time of the interview in 1992, including cases he worked on, his colleagues, and staff. He talks about how legislation has affected the job of judges, including the war on drugs, liability laws, and sentencing guidelines. He closes the interview with a discussion of the members of the Oregon delegation to Congress.

Johnson, Lee (Robertson Lee), 1930-2009

Oral history interviews with Windsor Dean Calkins, by Monica D. LaRosa

Includes discussions of: family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon; education at University of Oregon and Willamette University Law School, Clark Honors College; portraits of Windsor Calkins (father) and Steve Deutsch; lobbying and drafting bills at the state legislature, including probate code; law practice in personal injury defense, medical malpractice, for public utilities, Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) in particular, and for Sacred Heart Hospital, Eugene. Also includes discussions of court cases, including: Marilyn Durham v Donald Slocum M.D. before U.S. Judge Belloni; Norma Fay Kesey v State of Oregon et al., before Judge William Beckett; Dr. Carl Yeager v Sacred Heart Hospital, before Judge Hogan. Other topics include: professional organizations, including Eugene Inns of Court; U.S. Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference; family life and interest in music.

Calkins, Windsor Dean

Oral history interview with Denny Jones

This oral history interview with Denny Jones was conducted by Clark Hansen at Jones' home in Ontario, Oregon, from July 27-30, 1992. Jones' wife, Mildred Jones, was also present. In the interview, Jones discusses his family background and early life in Eastern Oregon and Montana, including training and racing horses, daily life on a cattle ranch, and life during Prohibition and the Depression. Denny Jones and Mildred Jones then discuss their courtship and wedding, as well as her family background. He then talks about buying a cattle ranch and issues ranchers face, including water rights, livestock loss, and using federal land for grazing. Jones discusses getting involved in politics, including lobbying for the Oregon Cattlemen's Association.

Jones discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1973 to the time of the interview in 1992, including his campaigns, his constituency, and legislation he worked on, particularly on agriculture and land use. He also discusses working with various governors' administrations, including those of Tom McCall, Bob Straub, Vic Atiyeh, and Neil Goldschmidt. He also discusses his relationship with the press, his conservative politics, and the procedures of the House. He talks about some of his fellow legislators, particularly John Kitzhaber and Vera Katz. He closes the interview by talking about his current family life and ranching activities.

Jones, Denny (Denzil Eugene), 1910-2012

Oral history interview with Sidney Leiken

This oral history interview with Sidney Leiken was conducted by Clark Hansen at Leiken's office in Roseburg, Oregon, on June 8, 1992. In the interview, Leiken discusses his family background and early life in New Haven, Connecticut, including the effect the Depression had on his family and his experience in the Civilian Conservation Corps, which brought him to Oregon. He then discusses working at sawmills, his marriage to Thora Hult, and the lumber business. He discusses moving to Roseburg, Oregon, starting a family, and getting into politics, including his involvement with the Democratic Party. Leiken talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1961 to 1967. He describes his campaign and constituency in Douglas County. He talks about legislation, including on taxes, community colleges, timber, labor, and land use. He also talks about his fellow legislators, including Monte Montgomery, Al Flegel, Jason Boe, and W.O. Kelsay. He also discusses working on Bob Duncan's campaign for the U.S. Senate in 1966. Leiken talks about leaving politics, his wife's cancer diagnosis, and her subsequent death in 1969. He goes on to talk about the changes in the Democratic Party since then, as well as partisan politics during his terms in the Legislature. He closes the interview with some words of advice to aspiring politicians, and a discussion of his family life.

Leiken, Sidney, 1916-2012

Oral history interview with Irvin Luiten

This oral history interview with Irvin "Irv" Herman Luiten was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from March 16, 1988, to January 19, 1990, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Luiten discusses his family background and early life on wheat farms in Ritzville and Edwall, Washington, including his early education and the struggles his family faced during the Great Depression. He then describes studying journalism at Washington State University in the late 1930s, including the evolution of his political views and his interest in radio broadcasting. He discusses his early career as a journalist for the Colville Examiner from 1940 to 1941 and for the Northwest Farm News in 1941. Luiten also talks extensively about his service during World War II, including acting as defense counsel for his battalion and about soldier morale. He talks about his work with the Military Intelligence Service to teach escape and evasion tactics to airmen and setting up lines of escape in France.

Next, he describes his post-war life, including taking the editorship of the Northwest Farm News; marrying Ellen Boyde and raising a family; taking a job at Washington State University; and beginning his career with the Weyerhaeuser Company, doing public relations work as a writer for Weyerhaeuser News. He talks about aspects of Weyerhaeuser that made him loyal to the company, including the company's forest management practices and the management style of Phil Weyerhaeuser. Luiten also describes his experiences as a lobbyist for Weyerhaeuser from 1953 to 1978. He talks about the primary issues Weyerhauser was concerned with, including taxes, particularly timber taxes; pollution; land use; environmental law; and labor laws. Luiten also discusses his involvement with the Izaak Walton League of America and his conservation work; the Clemons Tree Farm; the workplace culture at Weyerhaeuser; and the company's relationship with the public. He goes on to talk about working with lobbyists for other Oregon timber interests, the different timber harvesting philosophies between Weyerhaeuser and Georgia-Pacific, and how those philosophies affected the economy of the state. He speaks at length on the importance of public relations work. He also discusses working with legislators such as Mark Hatfield, Dick Neuberger, Clarence Barton, Dick Eymann, and Vic Atiyeh. He closes the interview by talking about his life in retirement.

Luiten, Irvin H. (Irvin Herman), 1915-1997

Oral history interview with Hector Macpherson, Jr.

This oral history interview with Hector Macpherson, Jr. was conducted by Clark Hansen at Macpherson's farm in Oakville, Oregon, from February 14-25, 1992. MacPherson's wife, Katharine "Kitty" Macpherson, was also present. In this interview, Macpherson discusses his family background and early life on a dairy farm in central Oregon. He speaks at length about his father, Hector Macpherson, Sr., and his activism regarding farm cooperatives and higher education. He then discusses his high school education, particularly his involvement in debate; the history of the land his family's dairy farm is on; and life for farmers during the Depression. He talks about studying science at Oregon State College, training for his military service during World War II, and meeting Kitty. He then discusses running a dairy farm, including water rights and milk pricing. He describes his interest in land-use planning in rural areas. Macpherson also talks about his time in the Oregon Senate from 1971 to 1974, particularly his work on Senate Bill 100, which concerned land-use planning. He also talks about his involvement with the Republican Party, his political campaign against Glenn Huston, and the election of John Burns as Senate president. He speaks about the nature of his constituency, and his thoughts on why rural areas tend to oppose environmental regulation. He then discusses other legislation he worked on, including on field burning, bicycle paths, the Bottle Bill, and additional land use planning. He talks about legislators he worked with, particularly Vic Atiyeh, Jason Boe, Ted Hallock, and Betty Roberts. He closes the interview with a discussion about serving on the Land Conservation and Development Commission, land-use laws in other states, and his impressions of the 1992 Oregon delegation to Congress.

Macpherson, Hector, Jr., 1918-2015

Oral history interview with Diarmuid O'Scannlain, by Michael O'Rourke

O'Scannlain discusses his family background and Irish heritage, his childhood in New York City, his education at St. John's Prep and Harvard, his involvement with the National Young Republicans and Trumpeters, his work as a lawyer in Portland, Oregon with the Dave Briggs firm (aka Stoel Rices) and Ragen, Roberts & O'Scannlain, his involvement in Republican politics and the Reagan administration, nuclear power, his appointment to the 9th Circuit Court, and some of the cases he oversaw while on that court.

O'Scannlain, Diarmuid F.

Oral history interview with John D. Mosser

This oral history interview with John D. Mosser was conducted by Clark Hansen at Mosser's home in Portland, Oregon, from November 15 to December 11, 1990. In this interview, Mosser discusses his family background and early life in the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. He talks about attending Princeton and working on the school newspaper, as well as his service in the U.S. Army during World War II, which interrupted his education. He details his experience fighting on the front lines in France. He discusses studying law at Yale, his marriage to Priscilla Alexander, and coming to Oregon to practice law, primarily admiralty law, in 1950.

Mosser discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his legislative service in the Oregon House of Representatives in 1957, including his campaign. He discusses legislation he worked on, particularly on education. He then discusses his activities before he re-entered the Legislature in 1963, including lobbying and raising a family. He goes on to talk about his return to the Oregon House of Representatives from 1963 to 1966. He discusses additional education legislation that he worked on, as well as legislation on taxes, labor, and land use. He speaks at length about the many legislators he worked with, particularly Vera Katz and Vic Atiyeh. He discusses his reasons for leaving the Legislature and his subsequent activities, including serving on the Board of Education and the Land Conservation and Development Commission, continuing his law practice, and leaving the Republican Party. He discusses serving on the Portland Waterfront Commission in the late 1960s, and his involvement in the creation of Tom McCall Waterfront Park. He closes the interview by talking about his family.

Mosser, John D. (John Daniel), 1923-1996

Oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry

This oral history interview with Lynn W. Newbry was conducted by Clark Hansen at Newbry's home in Talent, Oregon, from May 6-7, 1993. In this interview, Newbry discusses his family background and early life in Talent, including life on the family farm and the Depression. He also discusses the political career of his father, Earl T. Newbry. He talks about his education in Talent, as well as attending Oregon State College, and then Pomona College. He also briefly discusses serving in the Air Force during World War II. He discusses his courtship with Charlotte Short and their subsequent marriage in 1943. He discusses his return to Oregon in 1945 and taking over the family orchards and fruit business in 1949 when his father was appointed secretary of state, as well as several community organizations he was involved with. He discusses his involvement with the Republican Party, serving on the Talent school board, and running for the Oregon Senate in 1960. He discusses his legislative career in the Senate from 1961 to 1974, including his committee assignments. He also talks about his fellow legislators, including Harry Boivin, Grace Peck, Ted Hallock, Stafford Hansell, Debbs Potts, Bill Holmstrom, and Jason Boe. He also discusses legislation he worked on, including on land use, labor, taxes, health care, and agriculture. He talks about the administrations of governors Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, and Neil Goldschmidt; coalitions in the Senate; the procedure of creating legislation; and reapportionment. He closes the interview by discussing SB 100, the land-use planning bill of 1974.

Newbry, Lynn W. (Lyndel Warren), 1923-2012

Oral history interview with Ellen Goldberg, by Annica Eagle and Spencer Trueax

Ellen Goldberg is a lesbian activist who was one of the co-founders of the Mountain Moving Café, a collectively run restaurant that was created to engender networking, collaboration, and particularly political organizing. The café, with its large dance floor and performance stage, featured different entertainment every night of the month and was well-known for it's Wednesday Women's Nights (on these evenings, men were turned away). An earlier interview with Goldberg, addressing the café and radical political organizing, was conducted in 1978 (SR6314).

Goldberg, Ellen

Oral history interview with Sally Cohn, by Jade Davis and Erin Babcock Musick

Sally Cohn is a lesbian activist who has been involved with many organizations in Portland, Oregon since the 1970s. She discusses several topics including her involvement with the Lesbian Community Project, Old Lesbians Organizing for Change, lesbian stereotypes, women’s softball, and what it was like to fight anti-gay ballot measures. She also talks about her appearance on national television doing her “hand whistling.”

Cohn, Sally H.

Oral history interview with Earl T. Newbry

This oral history interview with Earl T. Newbry was conducted by Clark Hansen at Newbry's home in Ashland, Oregon, from July 23-24, 1990. In this interview, Newbry discusses his family background and early life, mostly in Eastern Oregon and northeastern Washington. He talks about working on and running the family orchard, Newbry Orchards. He then discusses his involvement in local politics in Jackson County, Oregon. He talks about his legislative career in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1939 to 1942 and in the Oregon Senate from 1943 to 1948, including his campaigns; balancing work and family; lobbyists; and his constituency. He also discusses many of his fellow legislators, including William McAllister, Truman Chase, and Eugene Marsh. He talks about legislation he worked on, including on labor, transportation, and taxes. He then discusses being secretary of state from 1949 to 1955, as well as his 1954 run for the governor's office. He discusses the duties of the secretary of state, including overseeing the Department of Motor Vehicles. He also talks about being a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1954 and his involvement with the Republican Party. He then discusses Oregon governors and legislators who served after he left politics, and reflects on his own accomplishments. He closes the interview by talking about his family, particularly his son, Lynn Newbry, and his political career.

Newbry, Earl T., 1900-1995

Oral history interview with Charles O. Porter

This oral history interview with Charles O. Porter was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Porter's office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 18 to November 7, 1986. In this interview, Porter discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including his education at Eugene High School, working for newspapers in the area, and his early political ambitions. He then talks about attending Harvard. He speaks at length about his experiences in Panama, and later in Europe, during World War II. He then talks about returning to Harvard, job prospects, and returning to Oregon to take a job on the state Highway Commission. He discusses practicing law in Eugene, including his experience with various judges, some of the cases he worked on, and the administration of justice. He then talks about getting involved in politics, including being offered the position of assistant to the U.S. attorney general by Monroe Sweetland. He turned down the offer and ran for Congress instead.

Porter discusses representing the Fourth District of Oregon in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1956 to 1960, particularly his campaigns. He talks about his fellow legislators, including Wayne Morse, Maurine Neuberger, Edith Green, and Joseph McCarthy. He discusses parliamentary procedure and legislation he worked on, particularly on foreign policy in Latin America. He also talks about his relationship with the press; his involvement with Amnesty International; and his activities as a lawyer after his 1960 re-election loss. He discusses many of the cases he worked on, including on prisoners' rights, fluoridation, sterilization, and a case against the Air Force. He closes the interview by talking about his family and the livability of Oregon.

Porter, Charles O. (Charles Orlando), 1919-2006

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