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Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

  • SR 1002
  • Collection
  • 1991-07-16 - 1992-04-29

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from July 16, 1991, to April 29, 1992. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 16, 1991, Frank discusses his family background and how it intertwines with the history of the Meier & Frank Company. He talks about the company's founding in 1857 by his great-grandfather, Aaron Meier, and the growth of the store during the 19th century, including the store's Friday Surprise marketing strategy and the buildings the store inhabited. He then talks about the history of Meier & Frank during the early 20th century, including his uncle Julius Meier's term as Oregon governor from 1931 to 1935, competition with other department stores in Portland, and Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He also talks about the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 6, 1991, Frank continues discussing the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank, including his management of the Meier & Frank Department Store beginning in 1937. He also continues discussing Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He talks about the use of credit lines in the department store, particularly during the Depression. He discusses the Meier & Frank board of directors, and begins talking about the expansion of the store into Salem.

In the third interview session, conducted on December 21, 1991, Frank continues discussing the expansion of the Meier & Frank Department Store into Salem. He talks about managing the Salem branch from 1955 to 1965, including tailoring merchandise to the Salem community, his involvement in Salem community organizations, and his relationship with his employees. He also talks about the store's seasonal events and his relationship with other Meier & Frank store managers.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 29, 1992, Frank discusses the conditions that led to the sale of the Meier & Frank Department Store to the May Company in 1965. He describes the family divisions surrounding the sale. He then talks about resigning as manager of the Salem branch and the effect of the sale on the store's personnel and customer base. He closes the interview by talking about his relationship with the management of the Meier & Frank Department Store at the time of the interview in 1992.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with Debbs Potts

This oral history interview with Debbs Potts was conducted by James Strassmaier in a Super 8 Motel in Grants Pass, Oregon, and at an ExecuLodge in Salem, Oregon, from April 15, 1991, to May 28, 1991. In the interview, Potts discusses his family background and early life in Eastern Oregon, including his family's religious life, his education in one-room schools, and working various jobs as a young teenager. He also talks about the sawmill business, including owning and operating various sawmills. He then discusses his marriage to Bobbye Irene Michael, including their attempts to adopt children. Potts talks about his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, including his training and life on a ship. He also discusses his time as mayor of Grants Pass from 1958 to 1960.

Potts then discusses serving in the state Senate from 1961 to 1984. He talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party; several prominent Democrats, including Harry Boivin and Jason Boe; and his early committee assignments, particularly the Ways and Means Committee. He discusses his campaigns, legislative procedure, and interpersonal politics. He also talks about legislation that came up during his tenure, including on taxes, reapportionment, and education. He discusses working with other legislators, including Monte Montgomery, Ben Musa, Lynn Newbry, and Ed Fadeley. Potts talks about serving as president of the Senate from 1967 to 1970, including the process of getting elected to that position, having Cecil Edwards as his secretary, and the duties of the president. He also discusses working with different governors' administrations, the Senate presidency of Jason Boe, and partisan politics. Potts talks briefly about his faith and his adopted children. He closes the interview with a discussion on his activities after serving in the Legislature, including running the Oregon Lottery.

Potts, Debbs (Eugene Debbs), 1908-2003

Oral history interview with William L. Dickson

This oral history interview with William L. Dickson was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Dickson's apartment in San Diego, California, from September 25-26, 1991. In this interview, Dickson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including contracting polio while in high school and his early interest in politics, including his admiration of Franklin D. Roosevelt as a fellow polio survivor. He then discusses attending Northwestern Law School and many of his professors; clerking at the probate court in Portland; his family's religious faith; and getting started in a law practice in Portland. He talks about his experience as a debt collector during the Depression; his first run for the Oregon Legislature in 1930; and meeting his wife, Dorothy Adelaide Unk, in 1931.

Dickson goes on to discuss his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1933 to 1936, and in the Oregon Senate from 1937 to 1939, including his desire to help people burdened by debt; coordinating with his uncle, Ashby Dickson, to pass a constitutional amendment making judges nonpartisan positions; and legislation he worked on, particularly on the probate and guardianship code. He also talks about the role of lobbyists; the pay scale for legislators; and many of the legislators he served with, including Nan Wood Honeyman, Monroe Sweetland, and Frank Lonergan. He discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party; the impact of the Depression on his politics and career; and New Deal legislation.

Dickson then discusses his career after leaving the Legislature. He talks about working for the federal Department of Justice during World War II, particularly his work on cases involving land condemnation for military use, and arguing before Judge James Alger Fee. He then talks about serving as a judge on the Circuit Court of Multnomah County from 1954 to 1973. He discusses cases involving mental health and guardianship. He then talks about the lives and careers of his children. Dickson closes the interview with a discussion of national politics in the 1990s.

Dickson, William L. (William Lucas), 1907-2002

Oral history interview with Becky Johnson

This oral history interview with Elizabeth Johnson was conducted by Rick Harmon and Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from June 25, 1986, to March 31, 1993. In the interview, Johnson discusses her family background and early life in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Bellevue, Ohio, including her family's religious faith, and life under Prohibition and during the Depression. She then discusses attending Miami University, including joining a sorority, her involvement with the YWCA, and the discrimination she saw. She also discusses attending Wellesley College, then teaching English to high school students. Johnson then talks about her experience as a woman in the Navy during World War II, serving with the WAVES, particularly her time stationed in Portland and Astoria, Oregon.

Johnson then discusses, at length, the family background and early life of her husband, Oregon State Representative Sam Johnson. She discusses Sam Johnson's youth and his education in the San Francisco area and in France, as well as his struggle with hereditary gout. She talks about their marriage and settling in Redmond, Oregon, and Sam's career with his family's timber business, including a trip they took to Chile to explore timber opportunities there. She also discusses the S.S. Johnson Foundation.

Johnson goes on to talk about her involvement in Oregon politics, including her involvement with the Oregon Republican Women's organization, campaigning for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and particularly her role on the State Board of Education. She also talks about Sam Johnson's time in the Oregon House of Representatives, his relationship to the changing Republican Party, and legislation he was involved with. She also discusses his time as mayor of Redmond. Johnson closes the interview by talking about her family life.

Johnson, Becky (Elizabeth Avery Hill), 1913-2007

Oral history interview with Irvin Luiten

This oral history interview with Irvin "Irv" Herman Luiten was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from March 16, 1988, to January 19, 1990, at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Luiten discusses his family background and early life on wheat farms in Ritzville and Edwall, Washington, including his early education and the struggles his family faced during the Great Depression. He then describes studying journalism at Washington State University in the late 1930s, including the evolution of his political views and his interest in radio broadcasting. He discusses his early career as a journalist for the Colville Examiner from 1940 to 1941 and for the Northwest Farm News in 1941. Luiten also talks extensively about his service during World War II, including acting as defense counsel for his battalion and about soldier morale. He talks about his work with the Military Intelligence Service to teach escape and evasion tactics to airmen and setting up lines of escape in France.

Next, he describes his post-war life, including taking the editorship of the Northwest Farm News; marrying Ellen Boyde and raising a family; taking a job at Washington State University; and beginning his career with the Weyerhaeuser Company, doing public relations work as a writer for Weyerhaeuser News. He talks about aspects of Weyerhaeuser that made him loyal to the company, including the company's forest management practices and the management style of Phil Weyerhaeuser. Luiten also describes his experiences as a lobbyist for Weyerhaeuser from 1953 to 1978. He talks about the primary issues Weyerhauser was concerned with, including taxes, particularly timber taxes; pollution; land use; environmental law; and labor laws. Luiten also discusses his involvement with the Izaak Walton League of America and his conservation work; the Clemons Tree Farm; the workplace culture at Weyerhaeuser; and the company's relationship with the public. He goes on to talk about working with lobbyists for other Oregon timber interests, the different timber harvesting philosophies between Weyerhaeuser and Georgia-Pacific, and how those philosophies affected the economy of the state. He speaks at length on the importance of public relations work. He also discusses working with legislators such as Mark Hatfield, Dick Neuberger, Clarence Barton, Dick Eymann, and Vic Atiyeh. He closes the interview by talking about his life in retirement.

Luiten, Irvin H. (Irvin Herman), 1915-1997

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills

This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.

In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father's construction business, discusses her early education, and speaks about her father's death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war.

Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger's Senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger's role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger's personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers' senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers' cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Ambrose A. Oderman

  • SR 11275
  • Collection
  • 2005-04-05 - 2005-04-25

In this interview, Oderman discusses his family background and early life in Foxholm, North Dakota. He describes his experience during the 1918 flu pandemic, including the death of his father. He discusses his mother's remarriage and his early education. He talks about moving to Monroe, Oregon, in 1926, as well as his high school experience there. He then discusses studying business at the University of Oregon during the Depression, including his plans to become an accountant. He also tells several stories about growing up on a farm. He discusses working for the Public Utility Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration as an accountant and auditor. He talks about his family and his social life during that time. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and living in Vanport, Oregon, after the end of the war. He discusses his service as western region audit director for the U.S. Interior Department. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement.

Oderman, Ambrose A. (Ambrose Adolph), 1912-2014

Oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan

This oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on June 29, 1993. In this interview, Boe-Duncan discusses her memories of legislative historian Cecil L. Edwards. She talks about the close relationship between Edwards and her late husband, Oregon State Senator Jason Boe; Edwards' political beliefs; Edwards' retirement in 1976; and Boe's creation of the position of legislative historian for him. She shares several anecdotes about Edwards that demonstrate his personality and discusses her own relationship with him. She closes the interview by discussing what was expected of her as a legislator's wife.

Boe-Duncan, Kathryn, 1930-

Oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan

This oral history interview with Kathryn Boe-Duncan was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Portland, Oregon, from October 15 to December 9, 1993, and on April 10, 2002. Robert Duncan was also present. In this interview, Boe-Duncan discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon; her Lutheran upbringing; her early interest in music; her high school experience; and attending Pacific Lutheran University. She then discusses her marriage to Jason Boe and the difficulties involved in getting married at a young age. She talks about Jason Boe's early political career and involvement with the Democratic Party; daily life in Reedsport, Oregon, in the 1950s; and raising a family. She then discusses working as Jason Boe's secretary while he served in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1964 to 1970, including his campaigns. She also speaks about preparing the family to move to Salem, Oregon; social life in Salem, including her relationships with other politicians' wives; and the duties of a representative's secretary. She speaks at length about Jason Boe's legislative record in the Oregon Senate from 1970 to 1980, particularly his work advancing the legislative agenda of Governor Tom McCall. She also talks about his service as president of the Senate from 1973 to 1980, his work on improving the Capitol building, and his efforts in strengthening the power of the legislative branch. She also describes Jason Boe's political ambitions. Boe-Duncan then talks about Jason Boe's activities after leaving the Legislature, including his work as a lobbyist. She describes her career as a musician, which she began pursuing at age 40, as well as her work for the Oregon Historical Society from 1986 to 1989, and for Portland State University from 1989 to 1994. She closes the interview by talking about her marriage to Robert Duncan in 1995 and her family life.

Boe-Duncan, Kathryn, 1930-

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Wendell Gray

This oral history interview with Wendell Gray was conducted by Elizabeth Reichow and James Strassmaier from January 7, 1992, to October 28, 1993. In the first part of this interview, conducted by Elizabeth Reichow on January 7, 1992, Gray discusses his family background and early life on a ranch in Prineville, Oregon. He discusses having to quit law school at the University of Oregon due to appendicitis, returning to Prineville and working various jobs, and then attending the Northwestern College of Law in Portland, Oregon. He talks about his early law career as an insurance investigator while he was in law school, and about foreclosing mortgages with his uncle, Guy LaFollette, during the Depression. He then discusses practicing maritime law and the many clients he represented in the Portland area, particularly during World War II. He also discusses a trip he and his wife, Jean Patrick, took to East Asia in 1964. He goes on to talk about many of the maritime cases he worked on and the clients he represented over his career, as well as the other maritime lawyer in Portland, Erskine Wood. He talks about being on the board of directors of the Family Life Insurance Company; real estate investments; and chairing the Portland Chamber of Commerce.

In 1992, Wendell Gray narrated three tapes on his own. On these tapes, he speaks at length about "interesting people," including Dale, Mac, and Sib Smith of the Smith Brothers Office Outfitters; Orren Brownson; and Tom Cummins. He also talks about serving on the Portland School Board from 1948 to 1956, including the sale of the Lincoln High School building in downtown Portland.

The final part of the interview was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Gray's home in Portland from October 26-28, 1993. Diana Gray was also present. In this portion, Gray discusses his education at the University of Oregon from 1925 to 1928, including his social life, his involvement with the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, and meeting his first wife, Jean Patrick. He then discusses some of his recreational activities, including his involvement with the Deschutes Club, golfing, and the various golf clubs in the Portland area. He discusses serving on the Portland School Board from 1948 to 1956, including his election, policies they adopted, funding, and construction of new school buildings. He also briefly talks about Judge Gus Solomon. He closes the interview by talking about his children and family life.

Gray, Wendell (Wendell Oliver), 1908-1995

Oral history interview with Orlando Hollis

This oral history interview with Orlando Hollis in Hollis's office in Eugene, Oregon, was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from January 27 to July 21, 1989. Audio is incomplete; Tape 4 was discovered to be blank in 2015.

In this interview, Hollis discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon, including his father's career with Southern Pacific Railroad, his childhood activities, and his memories of World War I. He also talks about his early education and about working at the First National Bank of Eugene while studying law at the University of Oregon. He also describes several prominent community members in Eugene. He discusses studying law at the University of Oregon, particularly his professors. He also talks about his friendship with University of Oregon Law School Dean, and later U.S. Senator, Wayne Morse.

Hollis discusses teaching at the University of Oregon Law School beginning in 1931, and serving as dean from 1945 to 1967. He talks about the administration of the university; how the Depression affected the law school; and students of his who went on to gain prominence, including Judge Ted Goodwin. He also talks about serving on the Eugene Water Board in the 1930s; judicial procedure; and changes in the law that affected how he taught. He also talks about his friendship with Judge James Alger Fee. Hollis discusses leading the Governor's Commission on Judicial Reform from 1971 to 1975, including legislators he worked with. He talks about constitutional law; the role of the judiciary; and appointments to the courts made by governors Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall. He describes his home and social life, particularly a trip to Moscow, Russia, in 1936. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since retiring as dean of the University of Oregon Law School in 1967.

Hollis, Orlando John, 1904-2000

Oral history interview with Otto Skopil

This oral history interview with Otto Skopil was conducted by Rick Harmon and Jim Strassmaier in Skopil's chambers at the Pioneer Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from August 19, 1985, to November 27, 1989. The audio for this interview is incomplete; Tape 26 was discovered to be blank in 2020, but its contents are reflected in an incomplete transcript and in an index.

In the interview, Skopil discusses his family background and early life in Salem, Oregon, including his time at Salem High School and the effect of the Depression and the New Deal on the Salem area. Skopil talks about attending Willamette University in great detail. He discusses his World War II experience in the Navy from 1942 to 1945, between earning his bachelor's degree in economics and returning to Willamette earn his bachelor of laws. Skopil describes practicing law in Salem for 26 years, from 1946 to 1972, including partnering with his uncle, Ralph Skopil, and later with Bruce Williams. He discusses some of the cases he argued, particularly his only U.S. Supreme Court case, which involved State Farm Insurance. He then briefly discusses his personal life, including his two marriages, first to June Johnson, then to Jan Lundy, and his involvement in various religious and civic organizations, including the Board of Governors for the Oregon Bar. He also discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his opposition to both the Korean and Vietnam wars, as well as how the draft affected his son, Ric Skopil. He talks about serving as a judge for the U.S. Circuit Court of Oregon, including his confirmation; the procedures of the court; sentencing; and the development of the magistrate system. He also discusses some of the cases he presided over on topics including the environment, white-collar crime, and securities. He talks at length about the case of Chuck Armsbury. He also discusses working with his fellow judges, particularly Gus Solomon and Robert Belloni, as well as his relationships with Mark Hatfield and Griffin Bell. Skopil then describes his time as a judge for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, including the relationship between that court and Congress; the increase of litigation during the 1980s; and the public perception of the court. He discusses some of the cases that came before the court on topics including mental health, capital punishment, timber, and drugs. He also talks about some of his fellow judges, particularly Ted Goodwin and James Browning. Skopil closes the interview by describing the importance of law clerks; discussing sentencing guidelines; and talking about his family life.

Skopil, Otto R. (Otto Richard), 1919-

Oral history interview with Walter H. Evans, III

This oral history interview with Walter H. Evans, III, was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Washington, D.C., from June 6-9, 1988. The audio is incomplete; Tape 3 was discovered to be blank in 2020. That portion of the interview is reflected in an incomplete transcript.

In this interview, Evans discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his early political beliefs. He speaks briefly about attending the University of Oregon and the Willamette University College of Law, then talks about working as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Chief Justice William Perry, as well as his role in the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He also talks about his friendship with Gerry Frank and becoming part of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's staff. He describes his duties as a legislative aide, then a press aide, and as legal counsel to Hatfield. He talks about other members of Hatfield's staff; Hatfield's relationship with other senators; and Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War. He discusses legislation that Hatfield worked on, Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign, and Hatfield's relationship with Oregon Governor Tom McCall and U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. He discusses appointments to federal offices in Oregon made during Hatfield's tenure and talks about communicating with the press. He also speaks further about Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, and talks about Hatfield's handling of the Watergate scandal. Evans closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's home and family life.

Evans, Walter H., III (Walter Howard), 1941-2017

Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from May 25, 1988, to May 2, 1990. In this interview, Frank discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his early education and the Meier & Frank department store, his family's business. He talks briefly about attending Stanford University, then discusses his Army service in Europe during World War II and his studies at Cambridge University in England. He talks about returning to Portland to work at Meier & Frank.

Frank speaks at length about Mark Hatfield's family background and early life. He talks about Hatfield's early political career, spirituality, and marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich. He talks about the 1965 sale of Meier & Frank, and his subsequent deeper involvement with Hatfield's political career. He discusses his economic planning work on the Governor's Advisory Committee, working with Glenn Jackson, and the Republican Party in Oregon. He talks about Hatfield's elections; Hatfield's brush with the vice presidential nomination in 1968; and Hatfield's working relationships with Oregon state legislators. He describes Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, as well of some of Hatfield's other controversial positions. He then talks about going to Washington, D.C., his duties as a member of Hatfield's staff, and other members of Hatfield's staff. He also talks about the conflict between Hatfield's liberal views and the increasing conservatism of the Republican Party. He speaks at length about running Hatfield's office, including managing correspondence and staff, and contracting with the Herman Miller company for furniture. He discusses the ways in which Hatfield remains connected to his constituency; the areas in which he disagrees with Hatfield; and how they handled a real estate scandal during Hatfield's 1984 re-election campaign. He discusses his personal activities, including writing an Oregon guidebook and his involvement with various organizations. He closes the interview by talking about how he first became acquainted with Mark Hatfield; Hatfield's political agenda; and issues contemporary to the interview session in 1990, including environmental concerns about logging and the proposed division of the Ninth Circuit Court.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with Richard H. Jones

This oral history interview with Richard H. Jones was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from December 11, 1987, to January 13, 1988. In this interview, Jones discusses his family background and early life in Colorado, including his early education. He then discusses his memories of the Depression and coming to the West Coast to accept a teaching job at Stanford University in 1938. He then talks about teaching history at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and becoming acquainted with Mark Hatfield and Gerry Frank. He discusses his involvement in Hatfield's 1958 campaign for Oregon governor. He discusses appointments Hatfield made as governor, and the increasing conservatism of the Republican Party. He also talks about the differences and similarities between Mark Hatfield and Tom McCall. He describes Hatfield's accomplishments as governor, including on education; Hatfield's relationship with the state Legislature; and the attempt to revise the Oregon constitution in the early 1960s. He discusses Hatfield's involvement with national Republican politics in the 1960s, particularly his involvement in the Goldwater and Nixon presidential campaigns. He also talks about Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, and how his own views aligned with Hatfield's; his involvement with Hatfield's senatorial campaigns; and Hatfield's relationship with U.S. Senator Bob Packwood. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's support for the National Rifle Association.

Jones, Richard H. (Richard Hutton), 1914-1998

Oral history interview with Wesley Granberg-Michaelson

This oral history interview with Wesley Granberg-Michaelson was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Parkridge, Illinois, and in San Antonio, Texas, from October 18, 1988, to May 28, 1989. In this interview, Granberg-Michaelson discusses his family background and early life in the Chicago, Illinois, area, including his early education. He tells the story of meeting Oregon Governor Mark Hatfield at the 1960 Republican National Convention when he was a teenager. He speaks at length about his evangelical Christian faith, his involvement in the Young Life movement, and how both permeated his political views. He speaks about his experiences at Hope College in Holland, Michigan, including his views on the Vietnam War at that time. He then discusses his experience at the Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey, including some of the courses he took and how his view of the Vietnam War evolved.

Granberg-Michaelson talks about meeting Mark Hatfield at the National Prayer Breakfast in 1968, and how that led to an internship with Hatfield, who had become a U.S. senator. He describes his duties as an intern, his promotion to full-time staff a year later, and working with other members of Hatfield's staff. He discusses his role as foreign policy advisor, particularly regarding the Vietnam War; Hatfield's relationship with President Richard Nixon; and Hatfield's relationship with his fellow members of Congress. He speaks at length about Hatfield's efforts to end the Vietnam War, including the McGovern-Hatfield amendment of 1970. He also talks about Hatfield's re-election campaign in 1972; Hatfield's spirituality; and Hatfield's opposition to nuclear weapons and power. He discusses his reasons for leaving Hatfield's staff in 1976.

Granberg-Michaelson discusses his personal life during his time as a member of Hatfield's staff, Hatfield's relationship with the evangelical community, and how Hatfield balanced his ideals with the need to compromise. He discusses his international travels, his marriage to Karen Granberg, and the protests against the draft and the Vietnam War. He speaks about the differences in management style between Sam Mallicoat and Gerry Frank, Hatfield's stance on Israel and Palestine, and a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield's 1984 re-election campaign. He discusses Hatfield's legislative efforts toward decentralizing government. He closes the interview by talking about Hatfield's family and personal life, and his own recent activities.

Granberg-Michaelson, Wesley

Oral history interview with Warne H. Nunn

This oral history interview with Warne H. Nunn was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from October 20 to November 3, 1987. In this interview, Nunn discusses his family background and early life on a farm outside Salem, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending Willamette University, including his professors. He talks about his career in civil service for the state of Oregon, beginning with a job at the Civil Service Commission in 1945, on the Public Utilities Commission in 1952, and as director of the Department of Motor Vehicles in 1956. He speaks about working with Mark Hatfield as assistant secretary of state from 1957 to 1959, and describes the make-up of Hatfield's staff, including Travis Cross. He also talks about Hatfield's relationship with the Oregon Republican Party; Hatfield's campaigns for Oregon governor; and his own friendship with Hatfield.

Nunn discusses serving as chief of staff for Hatfield from 1959 to 1967, including Hatfield's efforts to reorganize the state government, and Hatfield's working relationship with the Legislature, as well as with lobbyists. He also describes Hatfield's views on the Vietnam War; efforts toward Oregon's economic development; and the 1968 Republican Convention when Hatfield was being considered as Richard Nixon's running mate. He also discusses Hatfield's involvement with Barry Goldwater's 1964 presidential campaign. Nunn then discusses serving as chief of staff for Hatfield for three months in 1967 after Hatfield was elected as a U.S. senator. He talks about setting up an office in Washington, D.C., and some of the people who made up Hatfield's new staff, including Sam Mallicoat and Gerry Frank. He closes the interview by discussing his departure from Hatfield's staff and his return to Oregon.

Nunn, Warne H. (Warne Henry), 1920-2007

Oral history interview with Travis Cross

This oral history interview with Travis Cross was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Cross' office at St. Vincent's Hospital and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from October 8 to November 23, 1987. In this interview, Cross discusses his family background and early life in Salem, Oregon, including growing up in the same neighborhood as Mark Hatfield. He then talks about attending Willamette University at the same time as Hatfield, and how they became more closely acquainted. He talks about Hatfield's early life, military service during World War II, and college experiences at Stanford University and Willamette University. He talks about Hatfield's admiration for Herbert Hoover and Dwight D. Eisenhower; and about working at Willamette University at the same time as Hatfield.

Cross then discusses acting as an aide throughout Hatfield's Oregon political career, from 1957 to 1967. He discusses Hatfield as Oregon secretary of state, including helping with campaigns, and the make-up of Hatfield's staff. He describes the duties of the secretary of state, including running the elections division and serving on the board of control; some of their accomplishments during that time; and working with Governor Bob Holmes.

Cross talks about Hatfield as Oregon governor from 1959 to 1967. He discusses the appointment of Howard Appling as secretary of state, Hatfield's relationship with the Oregon Republican Party, and Hatfield's attempts to reorganize state government. He discusses working with the Oregon Legislature, appointments Hatfield made, and dealing with the press. Cross talks about Hatfield's political opponents, including Howard Morgan and Robert Y. Thornton. He also discusses Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, and his support for Barry Goldwater during the 1964 Republican presidential primary. He talks about Hatfield's 1966 campaign for the U.S. Senate, and his decision to leave Hatfield's staff. He discusses Hatfield's Washington, D.C., staff, including Gerry Frank. He also describes Glenn Jackson and Monte Montgomery. Cross closes the interview by discussing his activities after leaving Hatfield's staff and their continued friendship.

Cross, Travis (William Travis), 1927-2004

Oral history interview with Jim Towey

This oral history interview with Jim Towey was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on June 2, 1988. In this interview, Towey discusses his family background and early life in Jacksonville, Florida, including his Catholic upbringing. He talks about studying law at Florida State University, including working summer jobs and playing basketball. He then discusses his decision to forgo the practice of law and instead follow a spiritual calling to Washington, D.C. He describes how he came to be part of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield's staff in 1982; his duties as a legislative assistant and later legislative director; and some of the other members of the senator's staff. Towey relates a few anecdotes regarding Hatfield's personality and spirituality. Using abortion legislation as an example, he describes the way the staff would engage with Hatfield on specific legislation and how the senator made decisions. He also describes working on improving conditions for refugees and the abuses he witnessed, as well as his feelings on President Ronald Reagan's agenda in general. Towey speaks at length about a real estate scandal during Hatfield's 1984 re-election campaign and how they dealt with it. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's spiritual life.

Towey, Jim

Oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman

This oral history interview with Thomas R. Getman was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Getman's offices at World Vision in Washington, D.C., from June 3-8, 1988. In this interview, Getman discusses his family background and early life in Luverne, Minnesota, particularly the development of his religious and political beliefs. He then discusses attending Wheaton College in Chicago, Illinois, and working with Young Life ministries in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he heard Mark Hatfield speak for the first time. He talks about his longstanding admiration for Hatfield; his involvement with Young Life ministries in New England; and his work for Gerald R. Ford, including a story about being with the Ford family on the night of the 1976 presidential election. He then describes how he came to be on Hatfield's staff; discusses other staff members, particularly Doug Coe and Gerry Frank; and talks about how the staff and Hatfield interacted. Getman discusses his duties as legislative director, Hatfield's relationship with the Republican Party, and the senator's stance on several issues, including abortion. He speaks at length about Hatfield's personality, spirituality, and legislative agenda. He also talks about preacher Billy Graham, as well as the evangelical voting bloc. He discusses the Reagan administration's push for privatization and his own opinion on the limits of the private sector, particularly in regard to health care. He speaks about Hatfield's efforts to mitigate the damaging effects of privatization in his role as chair of the appropriations committee. He then talks about his work on legislation regarding Africa, particularly South Africa. He discusses the events surrounding Rajneeshpuram, and being in Africa on vacation during Hatfield's real estate scandal. He closes the interview by reflecting on the legacy and accomplishments of Hatfield's political career.

Getman, Thomas R.

Oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy

This oral history interview with J. Keith Kennedy was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Kennedy's office on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Kennedy discusses his family background and early life in Charlotte, North Carolina. He talks about his college education at Duke University in North Carolina, including influential professors. He then talks about interning for U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1972 to 1973, writing speeches, researching issues and political opponents, and assisting Wes Michaelson. He discusses Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign against Wayne Morse, and Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War, as well as Hatfield's feelings about President Richard Nixon's impeachment. He then discusses working as a legislative assistant for Hatfield from 1974 to 1977. Next, he speaks about his work on the Select Committee on Indian Affairs from 1977 to 1981, and on the Senate Appropriations Committee from 1981 to the time of this interview in 1988. Kennedy talks about Hatfield's legislative agenda and stance on some controversial issues, including the draft. He also talks about other members of Hatfield's staff, including Frank Cook. Kennedy closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's personality and spirituality, as well as Hatfield's relationship with his fellow legislators.

Kennedy, J. Keith

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 1752
  • Collection
  • 1989-04-26 - 1989-04-26

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session.

In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Charles L. Hayward

  • SR 2035
  • Collection
  • 1994-04-13 - 1994-05-04

This oral history interview with Charles L. Hayward was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from April 13 to May 4, 1994. The interview was meant to act as a sequel to an earlier interview with Hayward that was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in 1979. The sequel interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 13, 1994, Hayward discusses his family background and early life in Holyoke, Massachusetts, including his education and his social life. He talks about his experience studying chemical engineering and electrical engineering at Columbia University, including his social life, his involvement in sports, and the advent of World War I. He discusses his U.S. Army service in the 13th Balloon Corps in France during the war. He describes a back injury he sustained during training and the treatment he received after his discharge. He then talks about his career after the war, manufacturing time switches and later self-starting motors for clocks, known as Telechron motors. He also discusses his involvement with the American Legion and dealing with the Veterans Administration. He also talks about serving as chair for Minnesota congressman Walter Judd's campaign committee.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 4, 1994, Hayward discusses his association with Charles Lindbergh while Hayward was manufacturing clock self-starting motors. He also briefly revisits the topic of his U.S. Army service in the 13th Balloon Corps in France during the World War I. He then talks about his brief marriage to Grace Parsons and his relationship with her son, Robert P. Hayward. He discusses his affiliation with the Congregational Church and his involvement with the American Legion. He closes the interview by taking about his participation in a parade in Vancouver, Washington.

Hayward, Charles L. (Charles Lewis), 1895-1998

Oral history interview with Noreen Saltveit McGraw

  • SR 2409
  • Collection
  • 1996-11-29 - 1996-11-29

This oral history interview with Noreen Saltveit McGraw was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on November 29, 1996, as part of the Legacy of Hope: Catholics and Social Justice Project. In this interview, McGraw discusses representing the Hmong community, with the help of Reverend Morton Parks, in a case where a baby's spinal cord had been severed during delivery. McGraw mediated the dispute over whether to continue life support.

McGraw, Noreen Saltveit, 1934-

Oral history interview with Alan Green

  • SR 2824
  • Collection
  • 1999-04-20 - 1999-07-21

This oral history interview with Alan Green was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Green's office and home in Portland, Oregon, from April 20 to July 21, 1999. Tape 16 of the recording is missing, but the contents are reflected in an incomplete transcript of the interview.

In this interview, Green discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his memories of the Depression, his family history of alcoholism, and his early education, including his involvement in student body government during high school. He then discusses his experiences as a theodylite observer in the Army during World War II, including spending time in an Army hospital after a truck accident in New Guinea. He talks about attending Stanford University, including living in the Phi Delta fraternity house, and meeting his wife, Joan Irwin. He describes working an insurance salesman, his marriage, and starting a battery company. He also briefly discusses serving as president of the University Club in 1967 and his efforts to open membership to Jewish people. He talks about a DUI infraction in 1962, his struggle with alcoholism, and his path to sobriety, as well as his later work helping others get sober. He speaks at length about his management of various business enterprises.

Green discusses his involvement in moderate conservative politics and the Republican Party. He talks about his chairmanship of the Multnomah County Central Committee, the 1964 presidential campaign of Barry Goldwater, and Mark Hatfield's brush with the vice presidency in 1968. He also talks about Wayne Morse's defection to the Democratic Party. He speaks at length about his service on the Port of Portland, including competition with Seattle, labor issues, and other members of the commission, particularly Ed Westerdahl. He shares his memories of the Richard Nixon administration, particularly his feelings regarding the Watergate scandal and the rise of the far right. He also talks about serving on the Federal Maritime Commission from 1982 to 1988, including the confirmation process, the Shipping Act of 1985, and his social life while living in Washington, D.C. He talks about how his work on that commission was facilitated by both Mark Hatfield and Bob Packwood. Green then describes serving as chairman for George H.W. Bush's 1988 presidential campaign in Oregon and his subsequent appointment as ambassador to Romania in 1989.

Green speaks at length about serving as ambassador to Romania from 1989 to 1992. He talks about his confirmation, his training, and the fall of Nicolae Ceaușescu. He talks about the members of his staff, living behind the Iron Curtain, and helping Romanian political dissidents become American citizens. He then talks about the new Romanian president, Ion Iliescu, Romanian political parties, and Romanian society and economy after the revolution. He also talks about traveling through Europe while an ambassador, Romania's role in the Gulf War, and international adoption of Romanian children. He then discusses his activities during retirement, including sitting on various boards, and his involvement with the political campaigns of Gordon Smith and George W. Bush. He closes the interview by talking about his children and grandchildren.

Green, Alan, 1925-

Oral history interview with John Helmer, Jr.

This oral history interview with John Helmer was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on August 27, 1994. The interview was one of a series of brief oral histories created to accompany the Oregon Historical Society's World War II exhibit that same year.

In this interview, Helmer discusses his family background, including his parents' experiences as immigrants from Sweden and the origins of his family name. He talks about his early life in the Albina and Overlook neighborhoods of Portland, Oregon, including working at his father's store, John Helmer Haberdasher; his education; and his involvement in sports. He talks briefly about working in a sawmill after high school. Helmer then speaks at length about his service as a bomber pilot in the U.S. Air Force in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He describes his training, flying missions out of Okinawa, Japan, and his experience as part of the occupation of Japan. He talks about returning to Portland after his discharge in 1946, his marriage to Beverly Carroll in 1948, and taking a trip to Europe in 1952. He also discusses his family's political beliefs. He talks about purchasing John Helmer Haberdasher in 1956, his attempts to expand the business, and how the recession of the 1980s affected the store. He discusses the difference between a large department store and a small family-run business. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He also describes his and Beverly Helmer's retirement activities. He closes the interview by reflecting on how his experiences in World War II affected him.

Photographs of John Helmer, Jr., are included with the interview. They were taken by Jim Strassmaier at the time of the interview, both inside and outside the John Helmer Haberdasher store in Portland.

Helmer, John, Jr., 1923-2011

Oral history interview with Emery Neale

  • SR 339
  • Collection
  • 1988-02-10

This oral history interview with Emery Neale was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on February 10, 1988. In this interview, Neale discusses his family background and early life, including his early interest in tennis. He talks about tennis tournaments at the Irvington Tennis Club, building indoor tennis courts at the club, and his service on the Irvington Tennis Club board. He also briefly talks about Walter Goss, the president of the Irvington Tennis Club, as well as racial discrimination at tennis clubs. He discusses his career as a tennis player, including taking lessons, playing at Stanford University, and playing in national tournaments. He talks about his education at Stanford University and working as a teacher after graduating. He describes how his experience during World War II affected him. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with the People to People tennis tournaments.

Neale, Emery W. (Emery William), 1921-1994

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