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Oral history interview with Walter E. Hazlett

  • SR 800
  • Collection
  • 1974-02

This oral history interview with Walter E. Hazlett was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in February 1974. In this interview, Hazlett discusses his early life in Portage and Willmore, Pennsylvania, including his courtship with Naomi Ruth Long (also known as Ruth Hazlett), as well as working in coal mines. He also talks about working in the shipyards in Washington during World War II. He speaks about Ruth Hazlett, including her family background and their marriage. He describes his experience during the 1948 Vanport flood and talks about its aftermath at length. He speaks further about Ruth Hazlett. He speaks more about working in coal mines in Pennsylvania, including participating in labor strikes. He talks about his children, their careers, and his relationship with them. He then gives a timeline of the places he lived; talks about injuries he sustained in the workplace and in a car collision; and revisits the topic of his marriage. He also talks about his and Ruth Hazlett's family educational background. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of working in coal mines in Pennsylvania and his experience during the Depression.

Hazlett, Walter E. (Walter Earl), 1905-1976

Oral history interview with Mark Bocek

  • SR 813
  • Collection
  • 1979-04-21

This oral history interview with Mark Bocek was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 21, 1979. Bocek's daughter, Rose Mary Bocek, also contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Bocek discusses his family background and early life in Poland. He talks about immigrating to the United States in 1905 and describes his experience as an immigrant in Pennsylvania and New York, including the jobs he worked. He talks about serving in the U.S. Army beginning in 1909, and describes spending 18 months stationed in the Philippines and playing clarinet in the Army band. Bocek and Strassmaier also talk about some photographs of Bocek's time in the U.S. Army. He briefly discusses his marriage to Rose White in 1914; his activities in the Army after returning from the Philippines in 1912; and settling in Portland, Oregon. He talks about his education in Poland, the jobs he held in Portland, including during the Depression, and building engines for Liberty ships during World War II. He then talks about his children, their families, and their careers. Bocek and Rose Mary Bocek also share their memories of the Tillamook Burn. Bocek closes the interview by discussing the dedication necessary to learn how to play an instrument.

Bocek, Mark, 1887-1984

Oral history interview with Paul T. Gillette

  • SR 822
  • Collection
  • 1983-02-09

This oral history interview with Paul T. Gillette was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on February 9, 1983. An unidentified woman was also present and occasionally contributed interview questions.

In this interview, Gillette discusses his family background and early life in Ellston, Iowa, including life on his grandparents' farm. He talks about teaching high school in South Dakota and shares his memories of the Depression. He discusses his marriage to Jennie Maude Maule, his association with football player Frank Leahy, and working for the Kresge Company, which later became Kmart, in Buffalo, New York. He reflects on the places he lived and shows photographs to the interviewers, while discussing the effects of aging on his appearance and health. He then revisits the topic of his family background and early life in Ellston, Iowa. He talks about his religious affiliation, coaching basketball at a school in South Dakota, and attending the University of South Dakota. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of working for the Kresge Company.

Gillette, Paul T. (Paul Traverse), 1902-1992

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Windsor Calkins

  • SR 470
  • Collection
  • 1986-07-07 - 1986-08-01

This oral history interview with Windsor Calkins was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Calkins' office in Eugene, Oregon, from July 7 to August 1, 1986. In the interview, Calkins discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including a 1922 trip on foot from Newport to Florence, Oregon, with his father. He also discusses his father's career as a court reporter, as well as his own interest in the law. Calkins talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including taking classes from Wayne Morse. Calkins talks about practicing law in Eugene and some of the cases he argued, including bootlegging and murder cases. He also discusses the effect the Depression had on his family. He then talks about his experiences in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Calkins also talks about notable people from Eugene, including William G. East and other judges. He then discusses his work as a lawyer for the Eugene Water and Electric Board and Sacred Heart Hospital, as well as his involvement with the Lane County Bar Association, the Eugene City Health Board, and other civic organizations. He closes the interview with a description of malpractice lawsuits, as well as his family life.

Calkins, Windsor, 1910-1989

Oral history interview with Nona E. Colley

  • SR 927
  • Collection
  • 1987-09-25

This oral history interview with Nona E. Colley was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on September 25, 1987. Jan Wells was also present. In this interview, Colley discusses her experience working with Amos Burg as a child and starring in his film about children in England for Encyclopedia Britannica. She talks about her long-term correspondence with Burg. She also discusses her family and life as a child in post-war Britain.

Colley, Nona E., 1938-

Oral history interview with Emery Neale

  • SR 339
  • Collection
  • 1988-02-10

This oral history interview with Emery Neale was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on February 10, 1988. In this interview, Neale discusses his family background and early life, including his early interest in tennis. He talks about tennis tournaments at the Irvington Tennis Club, building indoor tennis courts at the club, and his service on the Irvington Tennis Club board. He also briefly talks about Walter Goss, the president of the Irvington Tennis Club, as well as racial discrimination at tennis clubs. He discusses his career as a tennis player, including taking lessons, playing at Stanford University, and playing in national tournaments. He talks about his education at Stanford University and working as a teacher after graduating. He describes how his experience during World War II affected him. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with the People to People tennis tournaments.

Neale, Emery W. (Emery William), 1921-1994

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 1752
  • Collection
  • 1989-04-26 - 1989-04-26

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session.

In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with John P. Meynink

  • SR 600-1
  • Collection
  • 1990-08-17 - 1990-08-24

This oral history interview with John P. Meynink was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from August 17-24, 1990. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 17, 1990, Meynink discusses his family background and early life in the Netherlands in the early 20th century, including working on farms. He then talks about his reasons for immigrating to the United States in 1923. He also briefly discusses his compulsory service in the Dutch Army. He describes his journey across the Atlantic and adjusting to life in the U.S., including learning English as a second language. He talks about the various jobs he held in Oregon and Washington, other immigrant groups in the area, and his experience during the Depression. He also discusses his political beliefs.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 24, 1990, Meynink continues discussing his political beliefs and his experience during the Depression. He talks about the various jobs he held in Oregon, including working at a bakery, running gas stations, and running the State Hotel in Astoria. He also discusses his marriage to Wanda Marie Rohrbough and running an ice cream shop in Newberg. He talks about becoming an accountant after moving to Portland in 1959; about his children, their families, and their careers; and about working as a tour guide in Portland. He discusses his interest in history and talks about both Dutch and Portland history. He closes the interview by talking about his affiliation with the Oregon Historical Society, about farming equipment, and about his health at the time of the interview in 1990.

Meynink, John P. (John Phillip), 1899-1995

Oral history interview with Ralph B. Bennett

  • SR 483
  • Collection
  • 1991-06-08

This oral history interview with Ralph B. Bennett was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Bennett's home in San Diego, California, on June 8, 1991. In this interview, Bennett discusses his family background. He talks about taking over The Optimist, a newspaper run by his father, Ralph B. Bennett, Sr., in The Dalles, Oregon. He talks about campaigning for public power and working with then-lawyer Gus Solomon, and how that led to him working for the Bonneville Power Administration. He then discusses his experience at Harvard University, including working on the student newspaper and his views about World War II before 1942. He also describes his political philosophy. He discusses working in public relations for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1946 to 1947, including people he worked with, his association with Woody Guthrie, and his work promoting public power. He also talks about leftist politics in Oregon. He describes living in Vanport, including running a newsletter and his experience during the 1948 flood. He briefly talks about working as a reporter for the Wenatchee Daily World in Ephrata, Washington, and his continued advocacy for public power. He then revisits the topics of working in public relations for the Bonneville Power Administration, living in Vanport, and his political philosophy. He closes the interview by talking more about Woody Guthrie.

Bennett, Ralph B. (Ralph Blackhurst), 1920-2002

Oral history interview with Gerry Frank

  • SR 1002
  • Collection
  • 1991-07-16 - 1992-04-29

This oral history interview with Gerry Frank was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Frank's office in Salem, Oregon, from July 16, 1991, to April 29, 1992. The interview was conducted in four sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 16, 1991, Frank discusses his family background and how it intertwines with the history of the Meier & Frank Company. He talks about the company's founding in 1857 by his great-grandfather, Aaron Meier, and the growth of the store during the 19th century, including the store's Friday Surprise marketing strategy and the buildings the store inhabited. He then talks about the history of Meier & Frank during the early 20th century, including his uncle Julius Meier's term as Oregon governor from 1931 to 1935, competition with other department stores in Portland, and Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He also talks about the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank.

In the second interview session, conducted on November 6, 1991, Frank continues discussing the life of his father, Aaron Meier Frank, including his management of the Meier & Frank Department Store beginning in 1937. He also continues discussing Meier & Frank's newspaper advertisements. He talks about the use of credit lines in the department store, particularly during the Depression. He discusses the Meier & Frank board of directors, and begins talking about the expansion of the store into Salem.

In the third interview session, conducted on December 21, 1991, Frank continues discussing the expansion of the Meier & Frank Department Store into Salem. He talks about managing the Salem branch from 1955 to 1965, including tailoring merchandise to the Salem community, his involvement in Salem community organizations, and his relationship with his employees. He also talks about the store's seasonal events and his relationship with other Meier & Frank store managers.

In the fourth and final interview session, conducted on April 29, 1992, Frank discusses the conditions that led to the sale of the Meier & Frank Department Store to the May Company in 1965. He describes the family divisions surrounding the sale. He then talks about resigning as manager of the Salem branch and the effect of the sale on the store's personnel and customer base. He closes the interview by talking about his relationship with the management of the Meier & Frank Department Store at the time of the interview in 1992.

Frank, Gerry

Oral history interview with Flavel W. Temple

  • SR 809
  • Collection
  • 1992-04-30 - 1992-10-13

This oral history interview with Flavel W. Temple was conducted by Linda Watkins from April 30 to May 1, 1992, and by Jim Strassmaier at Temple's office in Lake Oswego, Oregon, on October 13, 1992. Tapes 1 and 2 are missing, but their contents are included in an incomplete transcript. The interview was conducted in 3 sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 30, 1992, Temple discusses his family background and early life in Pendleton, Oregon, including his education and his family's ownership of the Temple Hotel. He talks about his experience at Behnke-Walker Business School in Portland, getting his start in the hotel business, and his experience during the Depression. He speaks at length about running the Washington Hotel in Portland, including the state the hotel was in when he took over, instituting weekly rates, and refurbishing the hotel. He also talks about speakeasies in Portland during Prohibition and about running the Congress Hotel in Portland. He describes his involvement in the Oregon Democratic Party, and talks about his involvement with several other clubs and organizations. He talks about racial discrimination in the hotel business and his reasons for being complicit in perpetuating it. He talks about his marriage to Hazel McBride in 1940, running a hotel during World War II, and his involvement with the Al Kader Temple of the Shriners. He also revisits the topic of running the Washington Hotel. He talks about his interest in a gold mine in Idaho; speaks at length about learning to fly planes and his involvement with various aviation organizations; and describes his interest in opera. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers; his interest in boating; and revisits his involvement with the Al Kader Temple and other organizations. He also discusses running the Timber Topper Restaurant.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 1, 1992, Temple continues discussing his involvement with the Al Kader Temple at length, particularly events he helped to organize and the organization's charitable works, including the Shriners Children's Hospital. He also talks about the Al Kader building and the decline in fraternal organizations' membership. He describes the car collision that killed his wife, Hazel Temple, and put him in the hospital for five months, and he talks about organizing the Oregon Restaurant Association during his recovery. He also talks about his involvement in the U.S. Army Association. He then revisits the topic of his recovery from the car collision. He talks about his marriage to Rachel E. Boyce and his involvement with the Save Our Stadium committee, and returns to the topic of managing the Washington Hotel. He discusses his travels with Rachel Temple in a motor home, revisits his involvement with the Al Kader Temple, and talks about the sale of the Washington Hotel and others in 1972. He describes his retirement activities, and talks about awards he received. He then tells a few anecdotes from his youth, about managing the Washington Hotel, about his involvement with the Al Kader Temple, and others. He reflects on his accomplishments and talks about his hopes for the future.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on October 13, 1992, Temple discusses arriving in Portland in 1932 and how he became involved in the hotel industry. He talks about his early years of managing the Washington Hotel during the Depression and Prohibition; discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party; and discusses running the Timber Topper Restaurant. He describes the improvements he made to the Washington Hotel, dealing with labor unions, and the sale of the Washington Hotel in 1972. He discusses the changes in the hotel industry from 1932 to the time of the interview in 1992, as well as hotel associations that he was involved with. He speaks about his marriage to and divorce from Judith Evangeline Hoffman, and talks about their child. He then talks about his involvement with the Al Kader Temple; describes the car collision that killed his wife, Hazel Temple, and put him in the hospital for five months; and speaks about learning to fly planes and his involvement with various aviation organizations. He discusses raising money for the Shiners Children's Hospital. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of his involvement with the Democratic Party.

Temple, Flavel W. (Flavel Wells), 1902-2001

Oral history interview with Charles B. Maxey

  • SR 4001
  • Collection
  • 1994-02-25 - 1994-11-18

This oral history interview with Charles B. Maxey was conducted by Jim Strassmaier at Maxey's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 25 to November 18, 1994. Johnnie Obina Maxey was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview. The interview was conducted in six sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 25, 1994, Maxey discusses his family background and early life in St. Augustine and in Longview, Texas, including his education, growing up in a predominantly black neighborhood, and learning to navigate a racist world. He speaks at length about the importance of reading black authors in high school. He then discusses trying to find decent-paying work in Texas, Colorado, and Utah after graduating from college, and describes how he ultimately decided to settle in Portland, Oregon, in 1943. He talks about working in the shipyards in Portland during World War II and describes his frustration with being denied promotions and other job opportunities due to his youth and race. He then talks about beginning his career as a barber. He also reflects on his college experience at Texas College in Tyler, Texas, and talks about meeting Johnnie O. Maxey and his unrealized plans to go to law school. He discusses his political beliefs and involvement with the Republican Party in Oregon; talks about his first impressions of Portland; and describes how life in Oregon for black people differed from the South.

In the second interview session, conducted on March 4, 1994, Maxey revisits the topic of his early life in St. Augustine and in Longview, Texas, including racism he experienced, learning to navigate a racist world, and working at a drugstore. He also revisits the topics of his first impressions of Portland, working in the shipyards, and beginning his career as a barber. He describes racism he experienced in Portland.

In the third interview session, conducted on March 25, 1994, Maxey talks about a fight between his father and a white police officer in Texas, and how the fallout affected his family. He discusses conditions for black people in Texas, and how they changed during the lead-up to World War II; talks about his experiences working wartime jobs; and describes the development of his political philosophy at the time of the war. He talks about his involvement with the NAACP; discusses people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights; and discusses conditions for black people in Portland after the war. He talks about the social life of the black community, racism they experienced, and the passage of Oregon's various civil rights acts. He also talks about the experiences of black members of the U.S. military during World War II, as well as his involvement in the Oregon Republican Party.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on April 1, 1994, Maxey continues discussing his involvement in the Oregon Republican Party and his involvement in the NAACP, as well as people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights. He also continues discussing his involvement in the NAACP. He discusses the slow progress of civil rights in Oregon; talks about his own activism; and shares his thoughts on interracial marriage. He talks about experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and discusses his experiences with Oregon Republicans such as Tom McCall, Clay Myers, and Sig Unander. He describes how the black community was disproportionately affected by the state's land seizures during the construction of I-5, including his own loss of his home and first two barbershops. He then discusses owning and operating a grocery store as a family business in North Portland, as well as a barbershop and other businesses that he ran on the side. He talks about raising his children, including their education.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on May 3, 1994, Maxey discusses the reasons why many black people left the South for the West. He talks about the types of jobs that were available to black people in Oregon during World War II and the impact of Oliver Smith's campaign for the Oregon Legislature, and he revisits the topic of people being accused of communism for advocating for civil rights. He discusses his political views, his disagreements with the national Republican Party, and his reasons for remaining a registered Republican. He then revisits the topic of experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and talks about having dinner with the governor of Utah. He shares his opinion on school integration and busing; talks about racism his children faced in Portland schools; and discusses the importance of historically black universities. He also revisits the topic of working in the shipyards and describes discrimination he experienced there. He describes the subtler forms that racism took in Oregon as opposed to the South. He then talks about his children, their families, and their careers; discusses his upbringing in the African Methodist Episcopal Church; and reflects on his accomplishments.

In the sixth and final interview session, conducted on November 18, 1994, Maxey revisits the topic of experiencing discrimination at a Young Republicans convention in Utah and describes the process through which the convention passed his resolution that the Young Republicans never again hold a convention at any hotel with discriminatory practices.

Maxey, Charles B. (Charles Britton), 1917-2001

Oral history interview with Charles L. Hayward

  • SR 2035
  • Collection
  • 1994-04-13 - 1994-05-04

This oral history interview with Charles L. Hayward was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from April 13 to May 4, 1994. The interview was meant to act as a sequel to an earlier interview with Hayward that was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in 1979. The sequel interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 13, 1994, Hayward discusses his family background and early life in Holyoke, Massachusetts, including his education and his social life. He talks about his experience studying chemical engineering and electrical engineering at Columbia University, including his social life, his involvement in sports, and the advent of World War I. He discusses his U.S. Army service in the 13th Balloon Corps in France during the war. He describes a back injury he sustained during training and the treatment he received after his discharge. He then talks about his career after the war, manufacturing time switches and later self-starting motors for clocks, known as Telechron motors. He also discusses his involvement with the American Legion and dealing with the Veterans Administration. He also talks about serving as chair for Minnesota congressman Walter Judd's campaign committee.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 4, 1994, Hayward discusses his association with Charles Lindbergh while Hayward was manufacturing clock self-starting motors. He also briefly revisits the topic of his U.S. Army service in the 13th Balloon Corps in France during the World War I. He then talks about his brief marriage to Grace Parsons and his relationship with her son, Robert P. Hayward. He discusses his affiliation with the Congregational Church and his involvement with the American Legion. He closes the interview by taking about his participation in a parade in Vancouver, Washington.

Hayward, Charles L. (Charles Lewis), 1895-1998

Oral history interview with Noreen Saltveit McGraw

  • SR 2409
  • Collection
  • 1996-11-29 - 1996-11-29

This oral history interview with Noreen Saltveit McGraw was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on November 29, 1996, as part of the Legacy of Hope: Catholics and Social Justice Project. In this interview, McGraw discusses representing the Hmong community, with the help of Reverend Morton Parks, in a case where a baby's spinal cord had been severed during delivery. McGraw mediated the dispute over whether to continue life support.

McGraw, Noreen Saltveit, 1934-

Oral history interview with Alan Green

  • SR 2824
  • Collection
  • 1999-04-20 - 1999-07-21

This oral history interview with Alan Green was conducted by Jim Strassmaier in Green's office and home in Portland, Oregon, from April 20 to July 21, 1999. Tape 16 of the recording is missing, but the contents are reflected in an incomplete transcript of the interview.

In this interview, Green discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his memories of the Depression, his family history of alcoholism, and his early education, including his involvement in student body government during high school. He then discusses his experiences as a theodylite observer in the Army during World War II, including spending time in an Army hospital after a truck accident in New Guinea. He talks about attending Stanford University, including living in the Phi Delta fraternity house, and meeting his wife, Joan Irwin. He describes working an insurance salesman, his marriage, and starting a battery company. He also briefly discusses serving as president of the University Club in 1967 and his efforts to open membership to Jewish people. He talks about a DUI infraction in 1962, his struggle with alcoholism, and his path to sobriety, as well as his later work helping others get sober. He speaks at length about his management of various business enterprises.

Green discusses his involvement in moderate conservative politics and the Republican Party. He talks about his chairmanship of the Multnomah County Central Committee, the 1964 presidential campaign of Barry Goldwater, and Mark Hatfield's brush with the vice presidency in 1968. He also talks about Wayne Morse's defection to the Democratic Party. He speaks at length about his service on the Port of Portland, including competition with Seattle, labor issues, and other members of the commission, particularly Ed Westerdahl. He shares his memories of the Richard Nixon administration, particularly his feelings regarding the Watergate scandal and the rise of the far right. He also talks about serving on the Federal Maritime Commission from 1982 to 1988, including the confirmation process, the Shipping Act of 1985, and his social life while living in Washington, D.C. He talks about how his work on that commission was facilitated by both Mark Hatfield and Bob Packwood. Green then describes serving as chairman for George H.W. Bush's 1988 presidential campaign in Oregon and his subsequent appointment as ambassador to Romania in 1989.

Green speaks at length about serving as ambassador to Romania from 1989 to 1992. He talks about his confirmation, his training, and the fall of Nicolae Ceaușescu. He talks about the members of his staff, living behind the Iron Curtain, and helping Romanian political dissidents become American citizens. He then talks about the new Romanian president, Ion Iliescu, Romanian political parties, and Romanian society and economy after the revolution. He also talks about traveling through Europe while an ambassador, Romania's role in the Gulf War, and international adoption of Romanian children. He then discusses his activities during retirement, including sitting on various boards, and his involvement with the political campaigns of Gordon Smith and George W. Bush. He closes the interview by talking about his children and grandchildren.

Green, Alan, 1925-

Oral history interview with Ambrose A. Oderman

  • SR 11275
  • Collection
  • 2005-04-05 - 2005-04-25

In this interview, Oderman discusses his family background and early life in Foxholm, North Dakota. He describes his experience during the 1918 flu pandemic, including the death of his father. He discusses his mother's remarriage and his early education. He talks about moving to Monroe, Oregon, in 1926, as well as his high school experience there. He then discusses studying business at the University of Oregon during the Depression, including his plans to become an accountant. He also tells several stories about growing up on a farm. He discusses working for the Public Utility Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration as an accountant and auditor. He talks about his family and his social life during that time. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and living in Vanport, Oregon, after the end of the war. He discusses his service as western region audit director for the U.S. Interior Department. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement.

Oderman, Ambrose A. (Ambrose Adolph), 1912-2014