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Oral history interview with Harry D. Boivin

This oral history interview with Harry Boivin was conducted by Clark Hansen in Boivin's office in Medford, Oregon, from July 25, 1991, to June 6, 1992. In this interview, Boivin discusses his family history and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon, as well as his education at Santa Clara University in California. He then discusses getting started in his law career, including working for the district attorney in Dorris, California, and then working with Claude McColloch in Klamath Falls.

Boivin then talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1935 to 1942, including serving as speaker of the House in 1937. He discusses partisan politics and coalition building; the old Capitol building and conditions after it burned down in 1937; his support of the New Deal; and his time as speaker. He discusses some of the legislators he worked with in the House, including Grace Peck. He also talks briefly about his activities after leaving the House, including trying to enlist during World War II, as well as serving on the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the Board of Education.

Boivin goes on to discuss serving in the Oregon Senate from 1955 to 1972, including as Senate president from 1961 to 1966. Some of the issues he discusses include reapportionment, logging and forestry, taxation, and agriculture. He also talks about campaigning, committee assignments, and the duties of the Senate president. Boivin talks often about the Oregon Institute of Technology and his role in its formation. He also discusses his working relationship with the many governors that served during his political career. He discusses his fellow senators, including Monte Montgomery, Al Ullman, Wayne Morse, and Debbs Potts.

He closes the interview by discussing the changes in the Democratic and Republican parties, and politics in general, over the second half of the 20th century.

Boivin, Harry D. (Harry Dolan), 1904-1999

Oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty

This oral history interview with Ancer L. Haggerty was conducted by Clark Hansen in Haggerty's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, in four sessions from December 9, 2005, to February 23, 2006. Interview sessions in December 2005, part of a session in January 2006, and the session in February 2006 were recorded on audiocassette. The other part of the session in January 2006 was recorded on videocassette.

In the December 2005 and January 2006 sessions recorded on audiocassette, Haggerty discusses his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, including his involvement in high school football. He talks about attending the University of Oregon, his views on the Vietnam War, and joining the Marine Corps. He discusses his military training, being wounded in Vietnam in 1968, and his rehabilitation. He also discusses some of the politics contemporary to the interview session in 2005. He talks about attending the U.C. Hastings College of the Law and taking the Oregon bar exam in 1973.

Haggerty speaks about his legal career, beginning with a brief discussion of his work as a public defender for the Metropolitan Public Defender in Portland from 1973 to 1977. He then talks about working as a lawyer with Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt from 1977 to 1989. He discusses his marriage to Judith Ann Blair in 1983, and their children. He talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1990 to 1993, including his appointment by Governor Neil Goldschmidt, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election campaign. He then talks about serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1993 to the time of the interview in 2006. He talks about his nomination by President Bill Clinton.

In the January 2006 video recording, Haggerty revisits the topic of his family background and early life in the Woodlawn neighborhood of Portland, his interest in playing football, and his service in the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. He then speaks in more detail about his college experience at U.C. Hastings College of the Law; his work as a public defender in Portland; and practicing law at Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt. He also talks about serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court and describes his experience as a judge on the Tom Metzger case, as well as other cases he heard. He then discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, including his fellow judges, writing opinions, and serving as chief judge. He closes the video session by discussing his judicial philosophy.

In the final, audio-only interview session in February 2006, Haggerty discusses his early years as a judge on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, his relationship with his fellow District Court judges and other court employees, and the role of the court. He talks about some of the cases he heard, his staff, and serving as chief judge from 2002 until the time of the interview in 2006. He also discusses writing opinions, funding for the courts, and the make-up of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2006. He talks about the public opinion of the U.S. District Court of Oregon, jury trials, and sentencing. He talks about national politics between 2000 and 2006. He closes the interview by reflecting on his career and accomplishments.

Haggerty, Ancer Lee, 1944-

Oral history interview with John R. Dellenback

This oral history interview with John R. Dellenback was conducted by Clark Hansen at Dellenback's home in Medford, Oregon, from June 24 to October 3, 1992. In this interview, Dellenback discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois, including his family life, his early education, and some of his influential teachers. He speaks at length about his Christian faith and how it has influenced his personal philosophy. He talks about his experience at Yale University, including his social life. He talks about the jobs he worked after graduating, including working as a bellboy and at General Electric in Connecticut. He describes his naval service in the Pacific Theater during World War II, including the invasion of Okinawa. He discusses attending the University of Michigan Law School, as well as his courtship of Mary Jane Benedict and their subsequent marriage. He then talks about practicing law with Frank Van Dyke in Medford, Oregon, including his philosophy of law. He also talks about his involvement with several local organizations, including the Oregon Bar Association. He discusses his involvement with the Republican Party, as well as his views on contemporary geopolitics.

Dellenback discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1960 to 1966. He talks about his reasons for running for the Legislature in 1960 and his campaign that year. He talks about his committee assignments, building coalitions, and the attempt to revise the state constitution in 1963. He also discusses other legislation that came up during his time in the House; Governor Mark Hatfield's administration; and engaging with his constituents. He also speaks at length about national Republican politics, including his longtime support for Nelson Rockefeller; President Richard Nixon and the Watergate scandal; and his moderate Republicanism. Dellenback then discusses serving in the U.S. House from 1967 to 1974. He talks about his decision to run for a seat in Congress, his campaigns, and his staff. He discusses legislation that came up in Congress during this time, his fellow representatives, and congressional procedure. He talks about the Vietnam War, the proliferation of nuclear weapons, and the Oregon Dunes. He also discusses his 1974 election loss.

Dellenback discusses serving as director of the Peace Corps from 1975 to 1977. He describes the mission and activities of the Peace Corps. He also talks about the 1992 presidential election. He talks about serving as president of the Christian College Coalition. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement with other faith-based organizations.

Dellenback, John R., 1918-2002

Oral history interview with Betty Roberts

This oral history interview of Betty Roberts was conducted by Clark Hansen from March 24, 1992, to September 19, 1994, at Roberts' home in Portland, Oregon. In the interview, Roberts describes her early life and family background, including growing up in Texas during the Depression and her father's alcohol poisoning. She also discusses meeting her first husband, John Willard "Bill" Rice, as well as their marriage and starting a family in Oregon. Roberts discusses attending Portland State College and the strain it put on her marriage to Rice; discrimination she encountered as an older woman student; and pursuing a master's degree at the University of Oregon. She also talks about her divorce from Rice due to his objection to her working outside the home, the divorce's effect on her children, and her subsequent marriage to Frank L. Roberts. She also discusses her divorce from Frank Roberts in 1965.

Roberts discusses her career as an educator, including teaching at high schools in East Portland; serving on school boards; and her activity in the Oregon Education Association. She talks about meeting her third husband, Keith Skelton; civil liberties; her involvement in the Democratic Party; and practicing law. She then talks about her experiences in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968, including campaigning, sexist media coverage, and teaching high school and attending law school at Northwestern College of Law while in the Legislature. Roberts discusses legislation she worked on during her time in the House, primarily on education, including sick leave for teachers and universal kindergarten.

Roberts also discusses her 1968 campaign for the Oregon Senate against Tom Mahoney, as well as the 1968 presidential campaign, including the debate around the Vietnam War and her attendance at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois, with U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. She then discusses her experience in the Oregon Senate from 1969 to 1977, including legislation on taxes, particularly sales taxes; women's rights; abortion; environmental issues; rape shield laws; and child custody. She discusses working with Debbs Potts, John D. Burns, and Gracie Peck, and and talks about running for governor against Bob Straub in 1974. She also discusses her run for the U.S. Senate against Bob Packwood the same year. She talks about the various forms of sexism she encountered while in the Senate, the formation of the Women's Caucus in 1973, and support for the Equal Rights Amendment.

Roberts talks about her time as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1982, and about working alongside judges Herbert Schwabe and W. Michael Gillette. She describes being appointed to the Oregon Supreme Court by Governor Vic Atiyeh and the encouragement she received from Norma Paulus. She discusses several cases from the years 1982 to 1986, including cases regarding sex discrimination and misuse of taxpayer monies. She also talks about her law clerk, Maureen Leonard, and about working alongside judges Jacob Tanzer and Mercedes Deiz. Roberts relates her opinion on the efficacy and procedures of the judicial system in Oregon. She discusses her activities after resigning from the court, including her involvement with Oregon Women Lawyers and the Bob Packwood sexual harassment scandal.

Roberts, Betty, 1923-2011

Oral history interview with Victor Atiyeh

This oral history interview with Victor Atiyeh was conducted by Clark Hansen at Atiyeh's office in Portland, Oregon, from November 24, 1992, to September 10, 1993, and on June 11, 1998. In this interview, Atiyeh discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his experience growing up as a Syrian American. He discusses his early education; talks about the family carpet business, Atiyeh Brothers; and his involvement in high school football. He describes his memories of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and his unsuccessful attempt to enlist in the military during World War II. He talks about the University of Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political beliefs. He also talks about his marriage to Delores Hewitt in 1944; dropping out of college to take over the family business; and his involvement in the Republican Party and other organizations.

Atiyeh discusses his service in Oregon state government and his political campaigns. He talks about serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1959 to 1964. He talks about his fellow legislators, including Stafford Hansell, Monte Montgomery, and Walter Pearson. He also talks about working with Governor Mark Hatfield. He discusses his committee assignments, legislation that came up during his service in the House, and working across party lines. Atiyeh then discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1965 to 1979, and describes the differences between the Senate and the House. He talks about his fellow senators, including Ted Hallock, Tony Yturri, and Don Willner. He discusses some of the legislation that came up during his service in the Senate, his committee assignments, and Senate procedures. He speaks at length about his involvement in taxation and environmental issues. Atiyeh also talks about national politics contemporary to 1992 and 1993; his voting record; and his relationship with the press.

Atiyeh discusses serving as Oregon governor from 1979 to 1987, including his campaigns. He talks about the transition, his staff, and administration appointments. He describes his philosophy of government, working with the Legislature, and the effect of the governorship on his family life. He discusses his administration's legislative agenda, including on energy and taxation; his use of the veto; and his relationships with other state governors. He discusses much of the legislation he signed as governor, his budgets, and many of the reforms he implemented. He also talks about Oregon's trade relationship with Japan, as well as a 1984 trip to the Middle East, particularly Syria. He describes the major issues of each legislative session during his government service.

Atiyeh discusses Oregon politics since he left elected office in 1987. He talks about Oregon governors Neil Goldschmidt and Barbara Roberts, as well as Oregon's congressional delegation. He discusses his involvement with the Boy Scouts, the Japan-America Society, and other organizations. The interview closes with a session conducted in 1998, in which Atiyeh discusses the Northwest Power Planning Council and his retirement activities, as well as a 1998 shooting at Thurston High School and his stance on gun control.

Atiyeh, Victor

Oral history interview with Howard Morgan

This oral history interview with Howard Morgan was conducted by Clark Hansen from August 25 to October 7, 1992. The interview was conducted in three sessions. Rosina Morgan was also present and contributed to the interview during the first session.

In the first session, conducted at Morgan's boat in Portland on August 25, 1992, Morgan discusses his family background, as well as the family background of his wife, Rosina Morgan. He talks about his early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, including his recreational activities, his education, and jobs he worked during the Depression. He also speaks briefly about spending a few years living with his aunt in San Francisco, California. He briefly discusses his experiences at the University of Oregon and Reed College. He talks about the jobs he worked during his college years, his memories of Pearl Harbor, and his experiences at the University of Berkeley. He speaks at length about working for the Office of Defense Transportation in Washington, D.C., and then for the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He describes his role in supplying equipment to the Navy and discusses spending time in Natal, Brazil, and in the Pacific Theater. The Morgans discuss their courtship and marriage. Rosina Morgan talks about her education and raising a family while Howard Morgan was working for the Navy.

In the second session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland on October 6, 1992, Morgan revisits the topic of working for the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He talks about instances of fraud and waste that he uncovered during that time. He talks about his activities after his discharge in 1945, including ranching and working for the American Veterans Committee. He also talks about his friendships with Monroe Sweetland and Dick Neuberger. Morgan then discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party of Oregon, particularly his efforts to make the Democratic Party competitive in Oregon. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives in 1949, including his election and his experience as a legislator in the minority party. He talks about lawmakers he worked with and legislation he worked on. He then discusses his service as chair of the Democratic Party of Oregon, including recruiting people to run for office, increasing the influence of the party, and recruiting Wayne Morse. He speaks about the various political campaigns he was involved in and talks about the legislative careers of Democrats who were elected during his time as chair.

In the third and final session, conducted at the Oregon Historical Society on October 7, 1992, Morgan continues speaking about the various political campaigns he was involved in and the legislative careers of Democrats who were elected during his time as chair. He also talks about his admiration for Adlai Stevenson and working for Stevenson's 1956 presidential campaign, as well as his experience at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. He goes on to talk about Oregon Democratic politics and politicians after he left the position of party chair. He then talks about his accomplishments during his service as Public Utility Commissioner from 1957 to 1959, and describes his dealings with some private utility companies, particularly Pacific Power & Light and the Portland Traction Company. He describes his accomplishments as a member of the Federal Power Commission from 1961 to 1963, and talks about his experience living in Washington, D.C. He talks about his reasons for running for the Oregon Senate in 1966 as an anti-Vietnam War candidate. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Morgan, Howard, 1914-

Oral history interview with Loran L. Stewart

This oral history interview with Loran L. Stewart was conducted by Clark Hansen in Eugene, Oregon, from October 29, 1992, to June 22, 1993. In this interview, Stewart discusses his family background and early life in logging camps in Lane County. He talks about his early education, working at Booth-Kelly lumber mill, and his experience during the Depression. He talks about studying forestry engineering at Oregon State University and working as a road locator for the U.S. Forest Service in the Willamette National Forest. He describes his Army service in during World War II, including his journey through North Africa and South Asia to reach China, where he spent much of the war. He briefly talks about the 1992 election, which had just occurred at the time of the interview. Stewart describes his return to civilian life in 1946, including working as an engineer for forestry companies. He also talks about meeting his wife, Dorothy Elizabeth McDonald, and their subsequent marriage in 1936. He gives a brief history of the lumber industry in Oregon; describes his 1946 purchase of Bohemia Lumber Company, which he refers to as Bohemia Mills, as well as the running of the company; and the 1991 sale of Bohemia Lumber Company to Willamette Industries.

Stewart discusses his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955. He talks about his campaign and his support for term limits. He also describes the Order of the Antelope, as well as other fraternal organizations he was involved with. He talks about his committee assignments, his fellow legislators, and legislation that he worked on, particularly regarding taxation and forestry. He discusses the administration of Governor Paul Patterson; working with lobbyists; and interacting with his constituents. He also discusses his 1956 re-election loss.

Stewart talks about his activities since leaving elected office. He discusses serving as president of Bohemia Lumber Company. He speaks at length about the growth of the company, as well as the forestry products industry. He talks about the increasing environmental movement during the 1980s and how that affected the business. He also discusses serving on the State Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee. He then reflects on Oregon legislators who served after his legislative service. He closes the interview by talking a little about his recreational activities and social life.

Stewart, Loran LaSells, 1911-2005

Oral history interview with Patrick E. Dooley

This oral history interview with Patrick E. Dooley was conducted by Clark Hansen at Dooley's home in Wilsonville, Oregon, from September 23 to October 26, 1992. Barbara Lynch Dooley was also present for the session conducted on October 26, 1992.

In this interview, Dooley discusses his family background and early life in the Albina neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, including his early education at Catholic schools and his experience during the Depression. He talks about moving to Washington for his sister's education and about working various jobs. He then discusses his service in the U.S. Army in North Africa and Italy during World War II. He also talks about his marriage to Barbara Lynch in 1942. He discusses his determination to go to law school after his discharge in 1945; attending Reed College while working full time; studying law at Northwestern College of Law; and taking the Oregon bar exam. He talks about practicing law in Portland with Leo Smith, including some of the judges he argued before and some of the cases he handled.

Dooley discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1953 to 1958. He describes his campaigns, his committee assignments, and legislation he worked on, particularly regarding taxes. He talks about Governor Paul Patterson's administration, as well as some of Dooley's fellow legislators. He also discusses partisanship in the Legislature and his role in the formation of party caucuses. He talks about his experience as speaker of the House from 1957 to 1958, including serving as acting governor, making committee assignments, and working with Governor Bob Holmes.

Dooley discusses serving as a Multnomah County Circuit Court judge from 1968 to 1983. He talks about court procedure, cases he heard, and his feelings about handing down sentences. He spends some time looking at a scrapbook and talking about the photographs and articles in it. He talks about judges and lawyers he worked with and admired; changes in the legal profession; and his philosophy of law. He closes the interview by reflecting on Oregon political history and his own accomplishments.

Dooley, Patrick Eugene, 1918-1999

Oral history interview with Ted Hallock

This oral history interview with Ted Hallock was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Hallock Agency in Portland, Oregon, from March 15 to November 2, 1993. In the interview, Hallock discusses his family background and early life, mostly in the Irvington neighborhood of Portland; growing up during the Depression; and his early career in broadcasting, starting out in sound effects at KGW. He also discusses his interest in music; attending the University of Oregon; and his service as a bombardier in the Air Force during World War II and its effect on his life. Hallock discusses his decision to pursue a career in journalism and winning a Peabody Award for his radio broadcasting work at KPOJ.

Hallock talks about his experiences as a senator in the Oregon Legislature, and discusses many of the senators he worked with, such as Harry Boivin, Don Willner, Ben Musa, Tony Yturri, and Jason Boe. He also discusses his advertising agency, the Hallock Agency, and working on election campaigns, including U.S. Senator Wayne Morse's campaigns. Hallock details the some of the legislation he worked on while serving in the Oregon Senate from 1963 to 1982, including on health care and fluoridation; labor laws; sex education and abortion access; environmental regulations, land use planning, and SB 100; and electrical utilities. He also discusses his experiences working with governors Mark Hatfield, Tom McCall, Vic Atiyeh and Neil Goldschmidt. Hallock closes by discussing his work on the Northwest Power Planning Council, including energy conservation, nuclear waste disposal, and preservation of endangered species, particularly salmon.

Hallock, Ted

Oral history interview with Maurine B. Neuberger

This oral history interview with Maurine B. Neuberger was conducted by Clark Hansen from August 26 to December 12, 1991. The interview was conducted over eight sessions. The first session was conducted at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, while the rest were conducted at Neuberger's home in Portland.

In the first session, conducted on August 26, 1991, Neuberger discusses her family background and early life in Wilsonville, Oregon, including working on her grandparents' Salem farm, her education, and her memories of World War I. She talks about her experience at Monmouth College (now Western Oregon University), and then at the University of Oregon. She talks about teaching high school after graduating in 1929. She shares her memories of the Depression, her excitement at the election of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and living in Portland. She also talks about teaching in Providence, Rhode Island, for a year, and discusses a trip to Japan and China in 1940 and a trip to Europe in the 1930s. She discusses her involvement in the teachers' union, her summer activities, and meeting Dick Neuberger.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 30, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her husband, Dick Neuberger, including his expulsion from Oregon State University and some of his early political beliefs. She also talks about their marriage, Dick Neuberger's early political career, and the development of the Oregon Democratic Party in the 1940s and 1950s. Neuberger then discusses her service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955, including her campaign, her focus on civil rights and education, and her committee assignments. She also talks about the urban/rural divide in the Legislature and the state Legislature's relationship with the Oregon federal delegation.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 6, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955. She talks about legislation she worked on, particularly regarding billboards, consumer protection, education, and tax deductions for child care expenses. She speaks about lobbyists, reactionary right-wing groups, and the timber industry.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on September 13, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1951 to 1955. She continues talking about legislation she worked on, particularly regarding education. She talks about her re-election in 1953, her constituency, and her relationship with the press. She also talks about the salary she earned as a legislator, as well as the social life in Salem. She discusses Oregon state taxes, and the need for an annual legislative session. She then discusses Dick Neuberger's service in the Oregon Senate from 1949 to 1954 and talks about his campaign for the United States Senate in 1954.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on November 29, 1991, Neuberger discusses moving to Washington, D.C., in 1955. She talks about helping Dick Neuberger set up his Senate office, and about his staff. She discusses Dick Neuberger's service in the U.S. Senate from 1955 to 1960. She discusses his committee assignments, legislation he worked on, and senators he worked with. She also talks about Dick Neuberger's relationship with Senator Wayne Morse. She speaks about her social life and other activities while in Washington, D.C. She then talks about Dick Neuberger's failing health and his death from cancer in 1960. She discusses running for her husband's Senate seat later that year and speaks at length about her campaign. She talks about her service in the U.S. Senate from 1960 to 1965. She discusses her committee assignments and senators she worked with.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on December 9, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the U.S. Senate. She talks about the facilities available to women in the Senate building, legislation she worked on, and working with the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson administrations. She discusses some of the world events that occurred during her service, including the Cuban Missile Crisis. Neuberger and Hansen then look at and discuss photographs.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on December 10, 1991, Neuberger continues discussing her service in the U.S. Senate. She talks about her relationship with various foreign diplomats, shares her memories of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, and describes her vote for the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin resolution. She talks about the nominees to the U.S. Supreme Court during the 1950s and 1960s, as well as some of the senators she worked with. She describes some of the major pieces of legislation during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration, including the 1964 Civil Rights bill and the War on Poverty. She discusses her own legislative agenda, her reasons for not pursuing a second term, and her marriage to Philip Solomon in 1964. She also talks about her senatorial staff.

In the eighth and final interview session, conducted on December 12, 1991, Neuberger discusses her relationship with the Democratic Party and reflects on her final years the U.S. Senate. She continues talking about her senatorial staff. She then talks about her activities since leaving politics, including teaching at Radcliffe College, sitting on various commissions, and serving as an inspector of embassies. She shares her opinion of President Richard M. Nixon, and recounts witnessing him hitting his wife in public. She also shares her opinion of the Democratic Party leadership, as well as prominent Oregon politicians at the time of the interview in 1991, including Mark Hatfield. She closes the interview by talking about the expense of campaigning, the increasing role of women in politics, and her thoughts about the future.

Neuberger, Maurine B. (Maurine Brown), 1907-2000

Oral history interview with George F. Wingard

This oral history interview with George F. Wingard was conducted by Clark Hansen at Wingard's home in Eugene, Oregon, from November 16 to December 9, 1993. Wingard's dog was present and is audible throughout the interview. In this interview, Wingard discusses his family background and early life in Lakeview, Oregon, including his early education. He talks about witnessing his father's death from a heart attack in 1949. He talks about studying pre-med at the University of Oregon and transferring to Oregon State College (now Oregon State University) to study engineering. He discusses his learning disability and his struggle with his studies. He discusses his marriage to Rhea Henault. Wingard then speaks at length about running a construction business in Eugene in the 1960s.

Wingard discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his political career. He talks about serving on the Eugene City Council from 1967 to 1969, including his campaign and working on transportation issues. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1969 to 1970. He discusses his campaign, his fellow legislators, his committee assignments, and some of the legislation he worked on. He also talks about working with Governor Tom McCall's administration. He speaks at length about his opinions on issues such as abortion, field burning, and nuclear power. Wingard discusses serving in the Oregon Senate from 1971 to 1982. He talks about electing Senate presidents, his committee assignments, and his fellow legislators. He discusses legislation that came up, particularly the Bottle Bill and bills on nuclear power and land use planning. He also talks about his opposition to the lottery; his views on the criminal justice system; and the creation of single-member districts and how that affected the make-up of the Legislature. He speaks at length about the many pieces of legislation he introduced. Wingard discusses his unsuccessful 1980 campaign for state treasurer and his 1982 re-election loss.

Wingard discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks about his unsuccessful campaign for state treasurer in 1992. He closes the interview by talking about the Oregon legislative delegation of 1993.

Wingard, George F., Jr. (George Frank), 1935-

Oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott

This oral history interview with Herman P. Hendershott was conducted by Clark Hansen at Hendershott's home in Eugene, Oregon, from November 16, 1993, to January 13, 1994. In this interview, Hendershott discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, including his social life, his memories of Armistice Day in 1918, and his interest in skiing. He also talks about his memories of the 1929 stock market crash and the Depression that followed. He talks about attending the University of Oregon from 1931 to 1936, including a description of the campus and his professors. He then discusses serving as district attorney for Hood River County from 1936 to 1938, and talks about practicing law in Eugene, including judges he argued before and some of the cases he handled. He also talks about other lawyers that he admired. He describes his experience serving in Europe in the U.S. Army during World War II. He speaks briefly about his two marriages and his family life.

Hendershott discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1947 to 1949. He talks about his campaign; the 1947 plane crash that killed the governor, the secretary of state, and the president of the Senate; and juggling his service in the Legislature with his family life and his law practice. He talks about his committee assignments, legislation he worked on, and some of his fellow legislators. He discusses some of the issues that were important during his time in the Legislature, including taxes and public utilities.

Hedershott discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks about serving as city attorney for Eugene from 1959 to 1971; Martin Luther King Day celebrations and the black community; and hosting foreign exchange students. He speaks about his law practice, including arguing cases and the changes in the court system. He discusses traveling in Europe, in the Middle East, and in Asia. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of his family background and legal career.

Hendershott, Herman P. (Herman Phipps), 1913-2007

Oral history interview with Dick Eymann

This oral history interview with Dick Eymann was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Emerald PUD in Eugene, Oregon, from December 2, 1993, to September 8, 1994. In the interview, Eymann discusses his family background and early life in Saskatchewan, Canada; Scottsbluff, Nebraska; LaSalle, Colorado; Linton, North Dakota; Dallas and Portland, Oregon; and Anaheim, California. He also talks about his experiences studying political science at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, including his early political beliefs and registering as a Democrat. Eymann describes being drafted immediately after college and his experience as a U.S. Air Force airman in the Pacific theater during World War II, including training; deployment to Manila Bay, Philippines, and Okinawa, Japan; his thoughts on the atomic bomb; and serving with African-Americans. He then discusses raising a large family; working for the Weyerhaeuser Company in Springfield, Oregon, and his acquaintance with George Weyerhaeuser; and living on a chicken farm.

Eymann describes his experience representing Lane County in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1974. He discusses legislation he worked on, including on taxation, particularly attempts to pass a sales tax; electrical utilities and nuclear power; Lane Community College; and agricultural labor laws. He also speaks about his tenure as speaker of the House. He describes his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party and campaigning. He also discusses some of the people he worked with in the Oregon Legislature, including Keith Skelton, Clarence Barton, Nancy Fadeley, Debbs Potts, Jason Boe, Pat Dooley, and Stafford Hansell. Eymann relates his experience working under various Oregon governors, including Bob Holmes, Mark Hatfield, and Tom McCall. He closes the interview by discussing his life after politics, including his career with the Emerald People's Utility District in Lane County, Oregon.

Eymann, Dick (Richard Oswald), 1919-2005

Oral history interview with Connie McCready

This oral history interview with Connie McCready was conducted by Clark Hansen at McCready's home in Portland, Oregon, from March 21 to July 5, 1994. In this interview, McCready discusses her family background and early life in Portland. She also discusses her early career in journalism working for the Coos Bay Times and the Oregonian; and starting a family with her husband, Oregonian reporter Albert L. McCready. She discusses her involvement with the Republican Party, campaigning, her liberal politics, and her experience as a woman in the Oregon Legislature during the 1967 and 1969 sessions. McCready also discusses legislation she worked on, including taxes, fair employment, public transportation and TriMet, and her work on behalf of sternwheelers. McCready talks about some of the legislators she worked with, including Tom Mahoney, Bob Packwood, Stafford Hansell, and Jason Boe. She then discusses her time in the Portland City Council from 1970 to 1979, including the Mount Hood Freeway vote; the bureaus she ran, including fire, cable, and public works; her support for gay rights; and receiving death threats. She discusses the city commissioners and mayors she worked with, including Frank Ivancie, Neil Goldschmidt, Terry Schrunk, and Mildred Schwab. She also discusses her campaign against John Lorenz in 1976, and Portland's sister-city relationship with Sapporo, Japan.

McCready, Connie (Constance), 1921-2000

Oral history interview with Monte Montgomery

This oral history interview with Monte Montgomery was conducted by Clark Hansen at Montgomery's office in Eugene, Oregon, from January 18 to June 16, 1994. In this interview, Montgomery discusses his family background and early life in Oklahoma, including his memories of the Dust Bowl drought, his father's store, and his early education. He also discusses the racism he learned as a child and coming to terms with it later. He discusses studying engineering at the University of Oklahoma; his wife, Lois Roberts; and coming to Eugene, Oregon, in 1943. He also discusses jobs he held during this time, including working for the Douglas Aircraft Company and selling insurance. He talks about his involvement in the Junior Chamber of Commerce, the Eugene Planning Commission, the Jaycees, and other civic organizations.

Montgomery discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1959 to 1968. He talks about his campaigns, committee assignments, and some of his fellow legislators, including Stafford Hansell, Grace Peck, Kitty Musa, and Tom Mahoney. He describes serving as House minority leader from 1961 to 1963, and speaker of the House from 1965 to 1968. He talks about making committee assignments, working with the Senate, and the administration of Governor Mark Hatfield. He also discusses legislation that he worked on, including on Daylight Savings Time, community colleges, taxes, and worker compensation. He talks about considering running for Oregon governor in 1966, as well as his unsuccessful 1968 campaign for secretary of state. He talks about his relationship with the press, as well as an interview program he hosted. He describes the circumstances surrounding the 1967 riot at the Oregon State Penitentiary.

Montgomery talks about his activities after leaving the Legislature. He discusses the various boards he served on, including Northwest Power and Gas. He talks about the changes in the Republican Party. He describes his involvement with State Accident Insurance Fund Corporation and Association of Oregon Loggers, as well as his subsequent fraud charges, his conviction for misappropriation of funds, and his sentence. He closes the interview by discussing his faith.

Montgomery, Monte (Finis Firman), 1924-2016

Oral history interview with Keith D. Skelton

This oral history interview with Keith D. Skelton was conducted by Clark Hansen at Skelton's home in Portland, Oregon, from November 9, 1994, to May 12, 1995. In this interview, Skelton discusses his family background and early life on a farm in Pennsylvania, including his early education and his memories of the Depression. He talks about attending Edinboro State Teachers College, including his summer jobs and social life. He talks about working for a zipper company after graduating, studying history at the University of Michigan, and dropping out to earn money as an insurance adjuster for Liberty Mutual in various cities around New England. He describes getting his draft notice in 1941 and his subsequent marriage to Ruth Ellen Blake. He describes the lead-up to World War II and his service in the U.S. Air Force from 1942 to 1945. He talks about his pilot training and service in the Pacific theater. He discusses the effect that his war experience had on his political beliefs; the difficulty of returning to civilian life; and relocating to Seattle, Washington, in 1947. He talks about attending the University of Washington Law School and his involvement with progressive political groups. He describes trying to find regular work in Seattle before relocating to Eugene, Oregon, in 1951 to begin his own law firm.

Skelton next discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party. He talks about working with Charlie Porter to reinvigorate the party in Lane County during the 1950s. He describes a riot that broke out during vice presidential candidate Richard Nixon's 1952 visit to Eugene. He talks about his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1957 to 1960. He talks about his constituency and his campaigns, and also describes each of his legislative sessions. He discusses his committee assignments and fellow legislators, including Dick Eymann. He talks about some of the legislation he worked on, including on worker compensation, the justice system, and taxes. He discusses working with the administration of Governor Mark Hatfield. He also talks about his activities after leaving the Legislature in 1960, including his involvement with civic organizations, lobbying, and his law practice in Eugene. He describes some of the cases he handled.

Skelton discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives again from 1965 to 1974. He describes each of his legislative sessions, including his committee assignments and fellow legislators. He discusses working with the administration of Governor Tom McCall. He also talks about meeting fellow legislator Betty Roberts and their subsequent marriage; relocating to Portland in 1967; and his experience at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. He discusses some of the legislation that came up during his legislative service, including on abortion, public transportation, and worker compensation. He describes the reasons he didn't run for re-election in 1974.

Skelton talks about his activities since leaving the Legislature. He discusses the governors that have held office between 1974 and the time of the interview in 1995; Betty Roberts' service in the Oregon Senate; and the role of lobbyists. He talks about returning to the practice of law and serving on the board for Portland Community College. He closes the interview by talking about the influence of television on society and discussing his Christian faith and his family.

Skelton, Keith D. (Keith Dexter), 1918-1995

Oral history interview with Roger E. Martin

This oral history interview with Roger E. Martin was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from October 28, 1994, to November 10, 1995. In this interview, Martin discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his family life; his early jobs, including golf caddy; and his early education at Catholic schools. He then talks about attending the University of Oregon, including his studies in Latin American history and his social life. He also talks about his brief service in the U.S. Army. He talks about meeting Janet Duffy, as well as her family background. He speaks about their marriage in 1957 and divorce in 1979, particularly how it affected his children. He talks about his children, their careers, and their families. He discusses working for the family electronics business, Martin Electronics.

Martin discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his service in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1967 to 1978. He describes in detail each legislative session in which he served. He talks about his unsuccessful campaigns in 1962 and 1964, as well as his later successful campaigns. He talks about his committee assignments, working with the Senate, and social life. He discusses some of his fellow legislators, including Tony Yturri, Grace Peck, and Robert Smith. He talks about some of the legislation he worked on, including on taxes, water pollution, and government reorganization. He talks about reapportionment, the emergency board, and lobbyists. He discusses the creation of the Department of Fish and Wildlife in 1973. He talks about working with Governor Tom McCall's administration; practical jokes legislators played on one another; and Governor Bob Straub. He speaks at length about his unsuccessful campaign for the Republican nomination for governor in 1978.

Martin discusses his activities since leaving the Legislature. He talks his about career as a lobbyist and his continued involvement with the Republican Party. He also discusses the initiative process and recent ballot measures. He talks about his family life; his opinions on legislation current to 1993; and his marriage to Margaret Jane. He closes the interview by talking about his plans for the future.

Martin, Roger E. (Roger Edward), 1935-

Oral history interview with F. Leo Smith

This oral history interview with F. Leo Smith was conducted by Clark Hansen at Smith's home in Portland, Oregon, from September 23 to October 28, 1993. In this interview, Smith discusses the history of the Ku Klux Klan and anti-Catholic sentiment in Oregon. He then discusses the policies of the Democratic Party in the early 20th century, particularly in Oregon, and his involvement with the party. He describes his early law career in private practice during the Depression. He talks about his time in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1939 to 1944, including his campaigns, constituency, and committee assignments. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on in the House, particularly a bill on textbooks in public schools that was later overturned by the Oregon Supreme Court. He then discusses his brief term as Multnomah County district attorney, from 1957 to 1958, and the many vice cases he prosecuted. He also talks about his involvement with the Catholic Church as a member, lawyer, and lobbyist. He discusses his later career as a lobbyist, particularly his work on establishing the Public Employees Retirement System while lobbying for the Oregon State Employees Association, and in defeating a bill on abortion while lobbying for the Archdiocese of Portland. He closes the interview by talking about the changes in society over the 20th century.

Smith, F. Leo (Frank Leo)

Oral history interview with James M. Burns

This oral history interview with James M. Burns was conducted by Clark Hansen at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, in sessions from January 17, 1990, to August 25, 1998. Sandy Dixon and a person identified as Dan G. were also present for sessions in 1998. The audio is incomplete; Tape 8 is missing as of 2001.

In the interview, Burns discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including growing up in lumber camps, his mother's death in 1930 and his father's death in 1935, and being raised by his aunts. He also discusses his early education at Grant High School and the University of Portland. He then talks about leaving the university to join the Army in 1943 and his service in France during World War II. He discusses returning to Portland and finishing his undergraduate studies at the University of Portland, attending law school at Loyola Chicago University, and earning a law degree. He also briefly discusses cases that came up later in his career that law school did not prepare him for, including civil rights and malpractice lawsuits. Burns talks about meeting his wife, Helen Hogan, and starting a family while practicing law in Portland from 1950 to 1952; about serving as district attorney in Harney County from 1953 to 1955; and about practicing law again in Portland from 1956 to 1966. He also discusses his involvement in the Republican Party during this time period, as well as the Trumpeters; small-town life in Harney County; and the vice exposé published by the Oregonian newspaper and the political figures involved in the ensuing scandal.

Burns discusses serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court from 1966 to 1972, and on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1972 until he took senior status in 1989. He talks about the history of the District Court and cases that came before him, including on topics such as environmental protection, particularly logging in national forests; Native American fishing rights; wiretapping; capital punishment; and conditions in prisons. He also talks about his colleagues on the courts: Owen Panner, James Redden, Otto Skopil, Helen Frye, Robert Belloni, Mike Hogan, Diarmuid O'Scannlain, and Ed Leavy. Burns discusses his duties as chief judge from 1979 to 1984; sentencing guidelines; plea bargains; law clerks; landmark Supreme Court cases; and the procedures of the District Court. He also describes his activities since taking senior status; his wife's career in medicine; and teaching at the judicial college in Reno, Nevada.

Burns, James M., 1924-

Oral history interview with Helen J. Frye

This oral history interview with Helen J. Frye was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from January 9 to May 20, 2002. In this interview, Frye discusses her family background and early life in Klamath Falls, Oregon. She talks about her mother and brother contracting tuberculosis; how she was raised by her grandparents; and her early education. She then discusses attending the University of Oregon, including her professors; her involvement in student government and politics in general; and meeting Bill Frye and their subsequent marriage. She talks about teaching high school in Eugene, raising a family, and returning to the University of Oregon to study law.

Frye briefly discusses practicing law in Eugene and specializing in adoption. She talks about serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court, including her appointment by Governor Tom McCall. She also discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. District Court, including her appointment by President Jimmy Carter. She talks about the cases she heard; judges she served with; and court procedure. She discusses sentencing; the role of dissent in lower courts; and the role of juries. She closes the interview by discussing her legal philosophy and how her opinions have evolved over the years.

Frye, Helen J. (Helen Jackson), 1930-

Oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson

This oral history interview with Roosevelt Robinson was conducted by Clark Hansen at Robinson's home in Portland, Oregon, from February 12 to March 10, 2004. In this interview, Robsinson discusses his family background and early life in Georgia; he describes life as a black person in the segregated South, his early education, and growing up on a farm. He talks about attending Southwestern Christian College in Texas, and moving to Portland, Oregon, after graduation. He describes working for the National Biscuit Company (now known as Nabisco Inc.), racism he faced in Oregon, and his marriage to and later divorce from Beverlee Foreman. He then talks about giving up plans to become a minister and instead attending Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College. He also talks about taking the Oregon Bar exam.

Robinson discusses starting his private law practice in Portland. He talks about arguing cases before Judge Gus Solomon and some of the cases he handled. He then discusses working as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about cases he prosecuted (and a few he chose not to prosecute), and arguing against public defenders. He also discusses systemic racism in the criminal justice system. He discusses serving on the Oregon Parole Board, including some of the decisions he made. He discusses serving as a judge on the Multnomah County Circuit Court, including his appointment in 1990. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon Bar Association, as well as numerous other organizations. He discusses cases he heard on the Circuit Court, judicial procedure, and programs to reduce recidivism. He discusses his involvement with the community court program and the drug diversion court program. He closes the interview by talking about his children, their families, and their careers; his health; and the Roosevelt Robinson scholarship fund.

Robinson, Roosevelt, 1941-2004

Oral history interview with Edward Leavy

This oral history interview with Edward Leavy was conducted by Clark Hansen in Leavy's chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse (known as the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse) in Portland, Oregon, from March 2 to April 13, 2004. The portion of the interview conducted on March 30, 2004 (Tapes 10 through 12) appears to have been simultaneously recorded on audiocassette and video. In the audio recording, the parties make reference to the video recording, which is not included in this collection.

In this interview, Leavy discusses his family background and early life on a hops farm in Butteville, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending the University of Portland and studying at Notre Dame Law School, including his reasons for attending Catholic schools. He also speaks about how his faith informs his morality and judicial decisions, particularly regarding the Fifth Amendment. He discusses serving as a deputy district attorney for Lane County and some of the cases he prosecuted. He reflects at length upon the byzantine workings of the justice system, its strengths and weaknesses, and a judge's role within it.

Leavy discusses his election to the positions of Lane County District Court judge and Circuit Court judge, as well as the elections of other judges in Oregon. He talks about some of the cases he heard and some decisions of his that were reversed. He speaks at length about many of the judges he knew, including Ted Goodwin and Otto Skopil. He discusses the differences between state and federal courts. Leavy describes the magistrate system during the years he was a U.S. Magistrate for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He then speaks at length about mediating cases and reaching settlements. He discusses some controversial issues he's had to rule on, including drug use, the death penalty, and abortion. He also speaks briefly about his family life.

Leavy discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, beginning with his appointment by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. He discusses some of the cases he heard, including on Rajneeshpuram. He describes the various duties of federal judges; the processes and procedures of the Court of Appeals; and how it differs from the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his experience as a senior judge on the Court of Appeals since 1997, including mediating for U.S. v. Wen Ho Lee. He then talks about serving on the Surveillance Court of Review from 2001 to 2008, including the history and duties of that court. He also talks about writing opinions, his staff and law clerks, and the workload on the Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by discussing his thoughts on the trend of civil penalties in lieu of criminal, and concerns about the right to privacy.

Leavy, Edward, 1929-

Oral history interview with Douglas E. Coe

This oral history interview with Douglas E. Coe was conducted by Clark Hansen in Arlington, Virginia, on June 8, 1988. In this interview, Coe briefly discusses his family background and early life, focusing on his high school years in Salem, Oregon, and his memories of the Hatfield family. He talks about the evolution of his Christian faith, and how that led to his friendship with Mark Hatfield. He discusses how Hatfield's faith influenced his political career. He also talks about Hatfield's marriage to Antoinette Kuzmanich; Hatfield's political role models; and Hatfield's relationships with other politicians. He closes the interview with a discussion of Hatfield's public and private lives.

Coe, Douglas E. (Douglas Evans), 1928-2017

Oral history interview with Frank C. Cook

This oral history interview with Frank C. Cook was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Irish Inn in Ashland, Oregon, from November 29-30, 1989. Access to a portion of Tape 1, Side 1, is currently restricted.

In this interview, Cook discusses his family background and early life in Southern California, including his family's involvement with conservative Republican politics and his father's suicide. He discusses attending Occidental College in Los Angeles, California; his involvement with the Quaker movement and Buddhism; and the evolution of his political beliefs. He talks about serving in the National Guard from 1967 to 1968, during the Vietnam War.

Cook discusses working as an aide to U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield from 1969 to 1973. He talks about Hatfield's political career, including Hatfield's role in coaching California Governor Ronald Reagan and how Hatfield's views on the Vietnam War affected his political career and his family. He talks about writing speeches for Hatfield, his work on anti-draft legislation, and other members of Hatfield's staff, particularly Gerry Frank. He also talks about other legislation he worked on for Hatfield, particularly the Neighborhood Government Act; Hatfield's 1972 re-election campaign; and his work on Middle East issues. He closes the interview by discussing the possibilities for Hatfield's future career.

Cook, Frank C. (Franklin Charles), 1944-

Oral history interview with Jenna L. Dorn

This oral history interview with Jenna L. Dorn was conducted by Clark Hansen at the Union Pacific Building in Washington, D.C., from June 13-15, 1988. In this interview, Dorn discusses her family background and early life in La Grande, Oregon. She discusses moving to New Haven, Connecticut, and her involvement in the women's movement. She talks about how she joined the staff of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield in 1977; her work as a legislative assistant; and other members of Hatfield's staff, particularly Gerry Frank. She discusses legislation that she worked on for Hatfield, particularly regarding women's rights and the environment. She discusses how Hatfield communicated with his constituency, and Hatfield's efforts against budget cuts by the Reagan administration while he was serving on the Appropriations Committee. She talks about Hatfield's working relationship with U.S. Senator Bob Packwood and other members of the Oregon congressional delegation. She relates some anecdotes to demonstrate Hatfield's personality and spirituality. She also talks about leaving Hatfield's staff to work with Elizabeth Dole. She closes the interview by discussing the interpersonal relationships of Hatfield's staff.

Dorn, Jennifer Lynn, 1950-

Oral history interview with Marty B. Gold

This oral history interview with Marty B. Gold was conducted by Clark Hansen at Gold's office in Washington, D.C., from June 13-16, 1988. In this interview, Gold discusses his family background and early life in New York City and Miami Beach, Florida, including his early political beliefs. He discusses attending American University in Washington, D.C., including his involvement in Republican politics. He talks about how he came to be aware of Mark Hatfield; Republican party politics in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly the 1968 presidential election; and Hatfield's stance on controversial issues such as abortion and the Vietnam War. He then briefly describes his service in Vietnam.

Gold discusses his work as a legal assistant to Hatfield from 1972 to 1979, while Hatfield was a U.S. senator. He talks about his duties, including applying for grants, sitting in on committee meetings, and legislation he was involved with. He also discusses other members of Hatfield's staff, Hatfield's personality, and Hatfield's re-election campaigns. He talks about being named Outstanding Young Man in America in 1977, Hatfield's filibuster on legislation about the draft, and leaving Hatfield's staff to work for U.S. Senator Howard Baker of Tennessee. He closes the interview by discussing the changes in the U.S. Senate during his time there and his political philosophy.

Gold, Martin B., 1947-

Oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt

This oral history interview with Wendell Wyatt was conducted by Clark Hansen from May 17-19, 1988. In this interview, Wyatt briefly discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon, particularly the development of his political beliefs. He talks about his early career, including working as a special agent for the FBI, serving in the Marines during World War II, and practicing law in Astoria, Oregon. He then discusses his involvement with the Republican Party and his legislative career. He shares his memories of Mark Hatfield, including Hatfield's relationship with Oregon's political parties, Hatfield's primary political opponents, and Hatfield's involvement with the 1964 Barry Goldwater presidential campaign.

Wyatt then discusses serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, including his campaigns. He talks about working with Hatfield, then governor of Oregon, on Oregon-focused legislation, as well as working with Hatfield's staff. He also talks about Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War and his 1966 campaign for U.S. Senate. Wyatt also describes U.S. Senator Wayne Morse. He goes on to speak further about Hatfield, including his staff in Washington, D.C., and Hatfield's pacifism and political alignment. He speaks at length about the 1968 Republican Convention when Hatfield was being considered as Richard Nixon's running mate, as well as Hatfield's continued opposition to the Vietnam War and legislation he worked on related to it. Wyatt talks about the Oregon Republican Party's structure, Walter Huss as its chair, and the party's increasing conservatism. He closes the interview by discussing Hatfield's effectiveness as a U.S. senator, as well as Wyatt's social relationship with Hatfield.

Wyatt, Wendell William, 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Marian J. Bruner

This oral history interview with Marian J. Bruner was conducted by Clark Hansen at Bruner's home in Bowie, Maryland, on June 18, 1988. In this interview, Bruner discusses her family background and early life in Iowa. She talks about her schooling and her interest in Christian education; working for the Reform Church in New York City; and how she got a job on the staff of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield. She talks about the other members of Hatfield's staff, and discusses some of her duties as caseworker early in Hatfield's senatorial career, including correspondence and some of the cases she handled. She then discusses Hatfield's opposition to the Vietnam War and the related cases she dealt with, including conscientious objectors. She then speaks about her promotion to executive assistant and the change in her duties, including making travel arrangements and managing Hatfield's schedule. Bruner discusses the types of engagements she arranged and Hatfield's work-life balance, as well as his hobbies and personal life. She also talks often about Hatfield's Christian faith and his political philosophy. She discusses Hatfield's relationship with his staff, his role in designing a few commemorative medals, and his committee assignments, particularly the appropriations committee. She closes the interview by discussing her decision to leave Hatfield's staff at the end of 1980.

Bruner, Marian J. (Marian Jeanette), 1915-2018

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