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Oral history interview with Bill Hedlund

  • SR 1113
  • Collection
  • 1988-06-19

This oral history interview with Bill Hedlund was conducted by Richard McConnell on June 19, 1988. An unidentified woman was also present. In this interview, Hedlund discusses his experience in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1941 to 1942, and his experiences as a lobbyist. He discusses legislators and lobbyists he worked with, rules regarding lobbying activities, his involvement with the Democratic Party, and governors he served under while in the Legislature. He then looks at photographs and discusses them, his family history, and his early life in Portland. He discusses how he got interested in politics after he graduated from law school in 1935, and his jobs before running for the Legislature in 1940, including working for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.

Hedlund, Bill (William Hancock), 1910-1994

Oral history interview with Don Clark

  • SR 1166
  • Collection
  • 1994 August 30 - 1998 March 27

Clark discusses family heritage, education, and career beginnings in the criminal justice system; experiences as Multnomah County sheriff; campaign for the Multnomah County Commission; modernization of county government in Oregon; Mt. Hood freeway and regional transportation planning, Burnside Consortium, Columbia Villa, single-payer health care, and numerous other subjects of policy and politics of city and county in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s.

Clark, Donald Edward, 1933-

Oral history interview with Allan Hart

  • SR 1200
  • Collection
  • 1986-04-15 - 1986-07-22

This oral history interview with Allan Hart was conducted by James Strassmaier at Hart's office in the KOIN Center in Portland, Oregon, from April 15 to July 22, 1986. In this interview, Hart discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his education at Moran School. He talks about his education at Stanford University and Yale Law School, including his social life, his friendship with Boyd McNaughton, working for the Stanford and Yale papers, and the relationship between Yale and Harvard. He then discusses returning to Portland, joining his father's law firm, and cases he argued. Hart talks about serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 1936 to 1938 and cases he prosecuted, including liquor and narcotics cases. He also discusses the Lawyers Guild and the Oregon State Bar; his investigations into the Red Squad; the De Jong case; and his work on an antitrust case involving the American Medical Association. He then discusses his work as counsel for the Bonneville Power Administration from 1938 to 1941, including the beginnings of BPA, as well as dealing with private utilities and aluminum companies, particularly PGE and Alcoa. Hart also describes his experience during World War II as an officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Pacific Theater, and then during the occupation of Japan.

Hart discusses his return to law practice in 1946. He talks about taking on the Kenji Namba v. McCourt case as a way to overturn the Alien Land Law. He briefly discusses his involvement with the Oregon Democratic Party, as well as raising a family. He talks about establishing the Hart, Davidson, and Veazie firm in 1956, including working with Jebbie Davidson, as well as the subsequent changes the firm underwent, which ultimately led him to the law firm of Lindsay, Nahstoll, Hart, and Krause. He discusses his involvement with the American Civil Liberties Union and civil rights cases that he worked on. He discusses his involvement with education, including serving on the board of the Sylvan School District from 1952 to 1956, and facing issues of school funding; serving on the State Board of Higher Education; and serving on the board of Catlin Gabel School. Hart speaks at length about discriminatory practices at many Portland social clubs, as well as U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon's efforts against them. He then discusses his relationships with Solomon and U.S. Supreme Court Justices William O. Douglas and Abe Fortas. Hart talks about his stymied aspirations of being appointed as a judge; political infighting in the Democratic Party; and additional cases he worked on. He revisits the topic of the Bonneville Power Administration, describing the changes it underwent after World War II, as well as the WPPSS crisis of the 1980s. Hart closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Hart, Allan (Charles Allan), 1909-2002

Oral history interview with Flavel W. Temple

  • SR 809
  • Collection
  • 1992-04-30 - 1992-10-13

This oral history interview with Flavel W. Temple was conducted by Linda Watkins from April 30 to May 1, 1992, and by Jim Strassmaier at Temple's office in Lake Oswego, Oregon, on October 13, 1992. Tapes 1 and 2 are missing, but their contents are included in an incomplete transcript. The interview was conducted in 3 sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 30, 1992, Temple discusses his family background and early life in Pendleton, Oregon, including his education and his family's ownership of the Temple Hotel. He talks about his experience at Behnke-Walker Business School in Portland, getting his start in the hotel business, and his experience during the Depression. He speaks at length about running the Washington Hotel in Portland, including the state the hotel was in when he took over, instituting weekly rates, and refurbishing the hotel. He also talks about speakeasies in Portland during Prohibition and about running the Congress Hotel in Portland. He describes his involvement in the Oregon Democratic Party, and talks about his involvement with several other clubs and organizations. He talks about racial discrimination in the hotel business and his reasons for being complicit in perpetuating it. He talks about his marriage to Hazel McBride in 1940, running a hotel during World War II, and his involvement with the Al Kader Temple of the Shriners. He also revisits the topic of running the Washington Hotel. He talks about his interest in a gold mine in Idaho; speaks at length about learning to fly planes and his involvement with various aviation organizations; and describes his interest in opera. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers; his interest in boating; and revisits his involvement with the Al Kader Temple and other organizations. He also discusses running the Timber Topper Restaurant.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 1, 1992, Temple continues discussing his involvement with the Al Kader Temple at length, particularly events he helped to organize and the organization's charitable works, including the Shriners Children's Hospital. He also talks about the Al Kader building and the decline in fraternal organizations' membership. He describes the car collision that killed his wife, Hazel Temple, and put him in the hospital for five months, and he talks about organizing the Oregon Restaurant Association during his recovery. He also talks about his involvement in the U.S. Army Association. He then revisits the topic of his recovery from the car collision. He talks about his marriage to Rachel E. Boyce and his involvement with the Save Our Stadium committee, and returns to the topic of managing the Washington Hotel. He discusses his travels with Rachel Temple in a motor home, revisits his involvement with the Al Kader Temple, and talks about the sale of the Washington Hotel and others in 1972. He describes his retirement activities, and talks about awards he received. He then tells a few anecdotes from his youth, about managing the Washington Hotel, about his involvement with the Al Kader Temple, and others. He reflects on his accomplishments and talks about his hopes for the future.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on October 13, 1992, Temple discusses arriving in Portland in 1932 and how he became involved in the hotel industry. He talks about his early years of managing the Washington Hotel during the Depression and Prohibition; discusses his involvement with the Democratic Party; and discusses running the Timber Topper Restaurant. He describes the improvements he made to the Washington Hotel, dealing with labor unions, and the sale of the Washington Hotel in 1972. He discusses the changes in the hotel industry from 1932 to the time of the interview in 1992, as well as hotel associations that he was involved with. He speaks about his marriage to and divorce from Judith Evangeline Hoffman, and talks about their child. He then talks about his involvement with the Al Kader Temple; describes the car collision that killed his wife, Hazel Temple, and put him in the hospital for five months; and speaks about learning to fly planes and his involvement with various aviation organizations. He discusses raising money for the Shiners Children's Hospital. He closes the interview by revisiting the topic of his involvement with the Democratic Party.

Temple, Flavel W. (Flavel Wells), 1902-2001

Oral history interview with Ben Padrow

  • SR 9041
  • Collection
  • 1979-01-16 - 1979-02-09

This oral history interview with Ben Padrow was conducted by Charles Digregorio in Portland, Oregon, from January 16 to February 9, 1979. In this interview, Padrow discusses his family background and early life in South Portland, including his experience as a Jewish person. He briefly talks about his college education and early teaching jobs. Padrow discusses teaching at Portland State University beginning in 1955. He describes the growth of the campus during that time, discusses his teaching style, and talks about his students. He also talks about his other activities, including moderating the television show High Q, and coaching the school's College Bowl team. He talks about working as a speechwriter for various Oregon politicians, gives advice for delivering speeches, and discusses working as a consultant. Padrow discusses his involvement in the Democratic Party, particularly serving on the Multnomah County Commission from 1971 to 1974. He closes the interview by discussing the future of Portland State University.

Padrow, Ben, 1927-

Oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman

  • SR 9042
  • Collection
  • 1981-09-17

This oral history interview with Olga S. Freeman was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Eugene, Oregon, on September 17, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Freeman discusses her early life on a farm in Colton, Oregon; attending Oregon State University; and working as a math teacher in Oregon and California. She then talks about settling in Eugene after her marriage to Neil Freeman, and about teaching mathematics at the University of Oregon from 1943 to 1949. She discusses how her involvement in Lane County politics began with a Democratic speechwriting contest in which she took second place, losing to future U. S. Rep. Edith Green. She talks about serving as precinct committee chair, her involvement with the League of Women Voters, and running for the Oregon Legislature in 1952. She discusses her reasons for joining the Democratic Party and her campaign for Lane County treasurer. She speaks at length about her accomplishments as treasurer. Freeman talks about feeling as if the county commissioners didn't hold the office of treasurer in high esteem and how that pushed her to run for Lane County clerk in 1960. She discusses her accomplishments as county clerk, then describes how the office of county clerk was changed to an appointed position rather than elected, which led to her losing the position. She closes the interview by talking about her activities during retirement, including freelance writing.

Freeman, Olga Samuelson, 1903-1997

Oral history interview with Beulah J. Hand

  • SR 9043
  • Collection
  • 1981-09-01

This oral history interview with Beulah J. Hand was conducted by Linda S. Dodds in Milwaukie, Oregon, on September 1, 1981. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody.

In this interview, Hand discusses her early life in Baker and Portland, Oregon, including her memories of the Depression and working at the Oregonian newspaper in Portland during high school. She then describes attending Reed College, meeting Floyd Hand and their subsequent marriage, and the difficulty Floyd had finding a job after graduating during the Depression. She discusses Floyd Hand's service in the Navy during World War II and her experience traveling with him during his training, as well as working in the Portland shipyards.

Hand discusses getting involved in politics through an attempt to save public transportation in the Portland area. She talks about her reaction to Adlai Stevenson's defeat in the 1952 presidential election. She describes becoming precinct committeewoman for the Democratic Party, and then vice-chairman, alongside Chairman Richard Groener. She describes their efforts to build the Democratic Party in Oregon. She then talks about working as a secretary for Groener after he was elected to the Oregon Legislature in 1956, and about being appointed to the House of Representatives in 1957. She describes the ways in which she and other women legislators were treated differently. She also talks about her committee assignments, particularly her work on the highway, parks, and ways and means committees. She describes some of the legislation that she worked on, particularly regarding highways and public utility districts. She speaks at length about her opposition to nuclear power. She then talks about her unsuccessful campaigns for the Oregon Senate and secretary of state. She closes the interview by talking about the prominent Democrats she worked with during her political career.

Hand, Beulah J. (Beulah Joan Caviness), 1917-2009

Oral history interview with Vera Katz

  • SR 9044
  • Collection
  • 1982-04-28 - 1982-05-19

This oral history interview with Vera Katz was conducted by Linda S. Dodds at Katz's home in Portland, Oregon, from April 28 to May 19, 1982. At the time of the interview, Dodds' name was Linda S. Brody. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 28, 1982, Katz discusses her family's immigration to the United States from Nazi Germany in 1940. She talks about her early life in New York City, including her education and learning English. She then discusses her experience studying sociology and psychology at Brooklyn College; talks about her interest in modern dance and studying under Martha Graham; and speaks about her marriage to Mel Katz. She also briefly talks about working in marketing while in New York. She then discusses relocating to Portland, Oregon, in 1964, in order to support Mel Katz's career, and describes her early impressions of Portland. She talks about the beginnings of her political career working for Robert F. Kennedy's 1968 presidential campaign. She discusses lobbying the Legislature with the Kennedy Action Corps and how that led to her ultimately running to represent Multnomah County in the Oregon Legislature in 1972. She talks about her campaign, legislation she worked on, and her involvement with the Women's Caucus. She also talks about balancing her home life in Portland with her role as a legislator in Salem.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 19, 1982, Katz continues discussing representing Multnomah County in the Oregon Legislature from 1973 to the time of the interview in 1982. She continues talking about legislation she worked on, and discusses working with lobbyists and her fellow legislators. She talks about representing and connecting with her constituency, her role in Democratic party leadership in the Legislature, and her committee assignments. She discusses her experience as a woman legislator; describes her political philosophy; and speaks about serving on the Ways and Means committee. She closes the interview by discussing her plans for the future.

Katz, Vera, 1933-2017