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Oral history interview with William V. Deatherage [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with William V. Deatherage was conducted by Donald W. Brodie in Deatherage's office in Medford, Oregon, on February 24, 2003. In this interview, Deatherage discusses his service in the U.S. Navy from 1945 to 1948, particularly regarding the USS New Jersey. He then talks about his law professors at the University of Oregon. He discusses deciding to practice law with Otto Frohnmayer in Medford and gives a brief history of the law firm that was later known as Frohnmayer, Deatherage, Jamieson, Moore, Armosino and McGovern. He discusses some of the cases he tried over his career, including a first-degree murder case; judges he argued before; and his campaign for the Medford School Board. He also talks about his involvement in the Oregon State Bar and other legal organizations. He discusses the changes in the legal profession over the 20th century, including the increase in arbitration in lieu of trial. He also talks about government funding problems at the time of the interview and their effect on Medford. Deatherage and Brodie reminisce about the law school at the University of Oregon. Deatherage closes the interview by discussing his love of golf and gardening.

Deatherage, William V. (William Vernon), 1927-2018

Oral history interview with William V. Deatherage [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with William V. Deatherage was conducted by Donald W. Brodie in Deatherage's office in Medford, Oregon, on February 24, 2003. In this interview, Deatherage discusses his service in the U.S. Navy from 1945 to 1948, particularly regarding the USS New Jersey. He then talks about his law professors at the University of Oregon. He discusses deciding to practice law with Otto Frohnmayer in Medford and gives a brief history of the law firm that was later known as Frohnmayer, Deatherage, Jamieson, Moore, Armosino and McGovern. He discusses some of the cases he tried over his career, including a first-degree murder case; judges he argued before; and his campaign for the Medford School Board. He also talks about his involvement in the Oregon State Bar and other legal organizations. He discusses the changes in the legal profession over the 20th century, including the increase in arbitration in lieu of trial. He also talks about government funding problems at the time of the interview and their effect on Medford. Deatherage and Brodie reminisce about the law school at the University of Oregon. Deatherage closes the interview by discussing his love of golf and gardening.

Deatherage, William V. (William Vernon), 1927-2018

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 2. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns. Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with George D. Rives [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives’ home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm’s 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. Fedde’s wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present and often contributes to Canty-Jones’ questioning. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones’ name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.In this interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hauge, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. Fedde’s wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present and often contributes to Canty-Jones’ questioning. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones’ name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.In this interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hauge, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. Fedde’s wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present and often contributes to Canty-Jones’ questioning. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones’ name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.In this interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hauge, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. Fedde’s wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present and often contributes to Canty-Jones’ questioning. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones’ name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.In this interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hauge, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. Fedde’s wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present and often contributes to Canty-Jones’ questioning. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones’ name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.In this interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hauge, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. Fedde’s wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present and often contributes to Canty-Jones’ questioning. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones’ name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.In this interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hauge, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

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