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Oral history interview with Joe Kye [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Joe Kye was conducted by Sankar Raman and Allison Merkel on December 23, 2020. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. The interview was conducted remotely using Cleanfeed software due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In this interview, Kye discusses his family background and early life in Seoul, South Korea, and talks about his family's reasons for immigrating to the United States in 1993. He describes his experiences as a Korean immigrant in the U.S., including learning English, adjusting to American culture, and acting as a translator for his parents. He discusses his early interest in music and playing violin, talks about his early career ambitions, and shares his experiences at Yale University. He speaks about his reasons for not majoring in music at Yale, instead pursuing a career as a high school teacher; talks about his marriage to Natasha K. Kye; and discusses his decision to pursue a career as a musician. He speaks at length about the development of his music career in Sacramento, California, and in Portland, Oregon, and talks about telling stories while performing his music onstage. He closes the interview by discussing the difficulty of working as a musician as a new parent and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Kye, Joe (Joseph Hyon), 1987-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Jamie G. Partridge [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with Jamie G. Partridge was conducted in thirty sessions by Stephanie Vallance from February 7, 2020, to April 23, 2021. TThe interview was conducted as part of the Oregon Labor Oral History Program, which collects oral histories of individuals who have advocated for working people of Oregon, including public figures, union members, and workers. Sessions one through four were conducted at Partridge’s home in Portland, Oregon. The remaining sessions were conducted using Zoom video conferencing software due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the first interview session, conducted on February 7, 2020, Partridge discusses his family background and early life in California, Washington state, and in Lake Oswego, Oregon. He discusses the evolution of his political beliefs, particularly regarding racial justice and labor unions, and talks about some of the people who influenced him. He describes hitchhiking to San Francisco, California, during the 1967 “Summer of Love.”

In the second interview session, conducted on February 21, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his early life, including his education and jobs he worked. He speaks about his experiences in San Francisco during the 1967 “Summer of Love.” He describes his involvement in political, labor, and civil rights movements in the late 1960s while a student at Dartmouth College, including his experiences as a protestor at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. He also talks about becoming aware of class struggles and of his white privilege.

In the third interview session, conducted on February 28, 2020, Partridge shares his reason for dropping out of college in 1968, then talks about his work with the Brooklyn Action Center. He also describes his relationship with Tom Potter. He speaks about living in various collectives and communes during the 1970s, about seeking conscientious objector status during the Vietnam War, and about his involvement with the Black Panthers and the Community Control of Police initiative.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on March 6, 2020, Partridge discusses his relationship with the Portland Police Bureau, including his friendships with individual officers, witnessing police interactions with Black people, and his involvement with protests against police brutality. He shares his experiences as a victim of sexual assault, and talks about his identity as a bisexual man.

In the fifth interview session, conducted on July 11, 2020, Partridge discusses his involvement with the Black Panthers, talks about his work with feminist organizations, and shares his experiences teaching classes at an experimental high school. He also talks about living in collectives and communes in Portland, about various jobs he held, and about his experiences in San Francisco during the summer of 1976.

In the sixth interview session, conducted on July 18, 2020, Partridge discusses the evolution of his political views during the 1970s and joining the Freedom Socialist Party. He describes a co-parenting arrangement he entered with a former student. He talks about more jobs that he held and his early involvement with labor unions.

In the seventh interview session, conducted on July 25, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Freedom Socialist Party, and the co-parenting arrangement he entered with a former student. He talks about his involvement with the Central American Solidarity Committee in the 1980s, including traveling to Mexico and Nicaragua.

In the eighth interview session, conducted on August 1, 2020, Partridge discusses organizing postal workers to resist an attempt by the administration of President Donald J. Trump to dismantle the U.S. Postal Service at the time of the interview in 2020. He revisits the topic of his involvement with the Central American Solidarity Committee in the 1980s, talks about the connection between the labor movement and revolutionary politics in Central America, and discusses Canadian postal unions. He talks about his career as a letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service in Portland from 1984 to 2011. He also discusses campaigning for Jesse Jackson in the 1980s.

In the ninth interview session, conducted on August 29, 2020, Partridge discusses his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition, and continues to talk about campaigning for Jesse Jackson in the 1980s. He discusses his involvement in political campaigns for labor-friendly politicians in Oregon, as well as campaigns for issues such as minimum wage increases and the renaming of Portland streets. He also talks about his work as a contributor to various publications.

In the tenth interview session, conducted on September 19, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and reads from their newsletter. He talks about his involvement with Jobs with Justice, and about the political activism of his parents.

In the eleventh interview session , conducted on October 3, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and reads from their newsletter. He continues to talk about his involvement with Jobs with Justice, discusses the history of the Teamsters Union, and talks about the inclusion of agricultural workers in the labor movement. He talks about Jesse Jackson’s 1992 visit to Portland, and about the activities of the Portland Teacher’s Union in the 1990s.

In the twelfth interview session, conducted on October 16, 2020, Partridge discusses his involvement in election integrity efforts for the 2020 presidential election. He then continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and to read from their newsletter. He talks about the Workers Rights Hearing Board, and shares his thoughts about police interactions with protestors in Portland.

In the thirteenth interview session, conducted on October 23, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the Rainbow Coalition and read from their newsletter. He discusses his involvement in political campaigns, including acting as campaign manager for Geri Washington, as well lobbying on issues such as single payer health care and an increased minimum wage. He also talks about his relationship with U.S. Senator Ron Wyden.

In the fourteenth interview session, conducted on October 30, 2020, Partridge Partridge reflects on his lifetime of involvement in politics and protest movements. He discusses the transition of the Rainbow Coalition into the New Party, and talks about his involvement with the organization. He talks about the history of trade globalization and the 1999 World Trade Organization (WT) protests in Seattle, Washington.

In the fifteenth interview session, conducted on November 13, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with the New Party and read from their newsletter. He talks about gentrification in North and Northeast Portland, about recovering from a drug addiction, and about his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service.

In the sixteenth interview session, conducted on November 27, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, including working conditions and unions for postal workers.

In the seventeenth interview session, conducted on December 4, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and reads from the “Branch Mike” newsletter, which was published by the National Association of Letter Carriers Branch 82. He talks about working conditions and about women postal workers. He discusses his involvement in the postal workers’ union and talks about his political activism with the union.

In the eighteenth interview session, conducted on December 18, 2020, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and reads from the “Branch Mike” newsletter. He also talks about his retirement in 2011 and his continued involvement with the union.

In the nineteenth interview session, conducted on January 15, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss his career as a carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and reads from the “Branch Mike” newsletter. He continues to talk about his involvement with the postal workers union.

In the twentieth interview session, conducted on January 22, 2021, Partridge discusses the history and activities of Jobs with Justice, including the annual Bad Boss award and efforts to increase the minimum wage. He also talks about the relationship between police and labor.

In the twenty-first interview session, conducted on January 29, 2021, Partridge discusses his involvement with Jobs with Justice and the Workers Rights Board. He talks about the activities of those organizations, including efforts to organize workers at Powell’s Books.

In the twenty-second interview session, conducted on February 5, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss his involvement with Jobs with Justice and talk about its activities, including supporting unionization efforts. He also talks about the 2006 Great American Boycott.

In the twenty-third interview session, conducted on February 19, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss the 2006 Great American Boycott. He also talks about efforts to unionize workers at Providence Hospital and about his show on the Portland radio station KBOO.

In the twenty-fourth interview session, conducted on February 27, 2021, Partridge continues to discuss his show on the Portland radio station KBOO. He talks about the activities of Jobs with Justice, about federal labor legislation, and about the history of Portland’s day labor center. He speaks about the Occupy movement.

In the twenty-fifth interview session, conducted on March 5, 2021, Partridge revisits the topic of the Workers Rights Board, focusing on its work on behalf of postal workers. He discusses his involvement in the postal workers union after his retirement, particularly protesting the Postal Service retirement prefunding mandate.

In the twenty-sixth interview session, conducted on March 19, 2021, Partridge discusses his relationship with LaVern Simmons, including their involvement with the New Hope Missionary Baptist Church. He talks about Simmons’ early life and her children.

In the twenty-seventh interview session, conducted on March 26, 2021, Partridge revisits the topic of his involvement in the postal workers union after his retirement, particularly regarding resistance against the policies of Postmaster General Louis DeJoy.

In the twenty-eighth interview session, conducted on April 9, 2021, Partridge reviews his life of political activism, describing his involvement in movements not previously discussed in the interview, including Portland Tenants United and Don’t Shoot PDX. He also revisits the topics of his relationship with police officers and the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Portland.

In the twenty-ninth interview session, conducted on April 16, 2021, Partridge discusses his involvement with the Democratic Socialists of America. He also talks about the postal workers union.

In the thirtieth and final interview session, conducted on April 23, 2021, Partridge closes the interview by reflecting on the oral history interview experience, and by talking about his hopes for the future.

Partridge, Jamie G. (James Gilbert), 1949-

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting [Session 02]

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting’s views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting’s work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

Oral history interview with Anne Johnson [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Anne Johnson was conducted by Julianna Robidoux and Monica Salazar on November 29, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Sankar Raman was also present.

In this interview, Johnson discusses her family background and early life in Nairobi, Kenya, including her education. She talks about turning her love of creative pursuits into a tea and chocolate business in Oregon. She discusses her reasons for relocating to Portland, Oregon, for college. She describes the tea sommelier course she took, talks about starting her business, and discusses ethically sourcing her products. She talks about her partnership with her husband, Mark Johnson, about the importance of tea in her family life, and about her reasons for including chocolate in her business. She talks about her future plans for Mamancy Tea Co. She closes the interview by discussing discrimination that she experienced as a Black woman and an immigrant.

Johnson, Anne, 1978-

Oral history interview with Abdi Nazemian [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Abdi Nazemian was conducted by Sankar Raman and Nancy E. Dollahite on November 8, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Nazemian discusses his family background and early life in Paris, France; Toronto, Canada; and New York City. He shares the reasons his family left Iran for France, then Canada; talks about his experience growing up multilingual and about raising his own children to also be multilingual; and about adjusting to life in the United States. He discusses his cultural and ethnic identity, and his identity as a gay man, and talks about how those identities inform his writing. He speaks about his experiences and education at a boarding school in New York, talks about coming out to his family in his twenties, and describes his early career as a screenwriter in Los Angeles, California. He speaks at length about writing books telling queer Iranian stories, and about his writing process. He closes the interview by talking about how the AIDS pandemic affected him, by describing the themes of his novels, and by discussing public reception of his novels.

Nazemian, Abdi

Oral history interview with Chang-Shee Chang [Session 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Chang-Shee Chang was conducted by Dora Totoian on October 18, 2019. Sankar Raman was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview questions. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Chang discusses his family background and early life in Taiwan during the Sino-Japanese War; speaks about his ethnic and cultural identity; and talks about life during the White Terror period. He discusses his education and social life in Taipei, including his experience studying medicine at National Taiwan University, and speaks about how his feelings about China changed after coming to the United States. He talks about his marriage to Hwei Chang, discusses completing his medical residency in Baltimore, Maryland, and speaks about adjusting to life in the U.S., particularly the food. He talks about the process of becoming a naturalized citizen in 1973, and about his career as a vascular surgeon in Portland, Oregon, beginning in 1974. He speaks about raising a family in the Pacific Northwest. He talks about the origins of his nickname, "George," about incidences of racial discrimination his family experienced in the United States, and about his children and their careers. He closes the interview by discussing his experience with lung cancer and his retirement activities.

Chang, Chang-Shee, 1937-

Oral history interview with Ayan Salat [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Ayan Salat was conducted by Sankar Raman and Jessica Pollard on March 22, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Salat discusses her family background and early life in Somalia. She also shares the reasons that her father fled to Kenya in the 1990s. She shares her experiences living in refugee camps in Kenya from 2005 to 2015, including her education, her home and family life, and living conditions in the camps. She talks about the markets that her parents ran in the camps, about her social life, and about the process of immigrating to the United States. She talks about adjusting to life in the U.S., describes racism she experienced, and discusses her education in Portland, Oregon. She talks about writing poetry and reads one of her poems. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for the future and by sharing advice for young immigrants.

Salat, Ayan

Oral history interview with Dilshad Karim Saatchi [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Dilshad Karim Saatchi was conducted by Sankar Raman and Shea Seery on September 27, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Saatchi discusses his family background and early life as a Kurd in Iraq, including his experiences during the Iran-Iraq war, and during the Iraqi genocide of Kurds that began in 1991. He describes his family fleeing their home for the Kurdish countryside and talks about living in hiding from the Iraqi army in a makeshift refugee camp. He briefly talks about his education after returning home. He discusses working as an English translator for the U.S. military at a prison during the Iraq War, describes some of the interrogations that he was part of, and talks about the dangers of the job. He shares his reasons for immigrating to the United States. He talks about joining the U.S. Army, and shares his experiences during his 2012 deployment to Kandahar, Afghanistan. He discusses his reasons for settling in Portland, Oregon, and briefly talks about his marriage and his education at Portland State University. He closes the interview by reflecting on the fact that the majority of his life was spent in the midst of war, by sharing his experience with post-traumatic stress disorder, and by discussing his plans for the future.

Saatchi, Dilshad Karim, 1981-

Oral history interview with Xiomara Y. Torres [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Xiomara Y. Torres was conducted by Lisa Cohn and Sankar Raman on September 12, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Torres discusses her family background and early life in El Paraiso, El Salvador. She shares her reasons for talking about her former status as an undocumented immigrant. She describes her family's journey to California in 1980 and talks about the reasons her family fled El Salvador during the country's civil war. She discusses her early life as an undocumented immigrant in Los Angeles, including learning English, and her education. She speaks about her experiences in the U.S. foster care system. She talks about the process of receiving her green card, her experiences at the University of California, Berkeley, and about how her experiences in foster care influenced her choice to attend law school. She also talks about receiving U.S. citizenship in 2002, and speaks about her work as a family law lawyer in Oregon. She discusses doing interviews about her experiences, and a play written about her life. She closes the interview by talking about her plans for the future.

Torres, Xiomara Y., 1971-

Oral history interview with Nader Rezvani [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Nader Rezvani was conducted by Dora Totoian and Sankar Raman on August 15, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Rebecca Benoit was also present and contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Rezvani discusses his family background and early life in Tehran, Iran, including his education and his conversion from Islam to atheism. He describes life in pre-revolution Iran and talks about working as an inspector on a hydroelectric project after high school. He speaks about his experiences in Berlin, Germany, in 1963, and shares his reasons for immigrating to the United States that same year. He describes adjusting to life in the U.S., experiencing winter in New York, and his experiences living in Los Angeles and attending college to study mechanical engineering. He shares his reasons for moving to Beaverton, Oregon, and speaks about his 20-year career as an engineer at Tektronix, Inc. Rezvani talks about his children and grandchildren, and Benoit talks about the Iranian community in the Portland area. He discusses his retirement on a farm near Gaston, Oregon, and Benoit shares the story of meeting Rezvani. He closes the interview by sharing his opinion on events in Iran after he left in 1963, and by talking about U.S.-Iranian relations, and about his cultural and ethnic identity.

Rezvani, Nader, 1938-

Oral history interview with Nong Poonsukwattana [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Nong Poonsukwattana was conducted by Monica Salazar on August 12, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Poonsukwattana's landlord was also briefly present.

In this interview, Poonsukwattana discusses her family background and early life in Bangkok, Thailand, and talks about experiencing child abuse. She talks about immigrating to the United States after marrying an American citizen in 2003; about adjusting to life in Portland, Oregon, including learning English; and about working as a waitress in Thai restaurants in Portland, including Pok Pok. She discusses developing recipes, opening Nong's Khao Man Gai, a food cart in downtown Portland, in 2009, and then a restaurant of the same name in 2011. She then describes opening a second location for her restaurant in 2018. She closes the interview by sharing her plans for the future, by talking about managing her restaurant staff, and by discussing her experience with the immigration process.

Poonsukwattana, Nong, 1980-

Oral history interview with Reza Uddin [Sound Recording 02]

Session 1, Part 2. This oral history interview with Resa Uddin was conducted by Allison Merkel and Sankar Raman on July 25, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Uddin discusses his family background and early life in Maungdaw, Burma, in the 1960s and 1970s, including the relationship between Rohingya Muslims and Rakhine Buddhists. He describes the deterioration in the status of Rohingya Muslims after the 1982 change to the Burmese constitution that rescinded their citizenship, and talks about his experience in college in Rangoon, including his involvement in student organizations for Rohingya rights. He also discusses the history of oppression of the Rohingya, and describes the oppression he and his family experienced in the 1980s and 1990s. He speaks about coming to the United States on a student visa, and about his experiences living and studying in Pendleton, Oregon. He talks about the process of receiving asylum. He discusses his experiences at Portland State University, and as the only Rohingya in Portland until 2005. He also talks about his marriage and the process of getting a green card for his wife. He discusses jobs he held, including running a gas station with his wife in Salem, Oregon. He closes the interview by talking about his work to help other Rohingya refugees, and by sharing his thoughts about the future of the Rohingya people.

Uddin, Reza, 1964-

Oral history interview with Reza Uddin [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1, Part 1. This oral history interview with Resa Uddin was conducted by Allison Merkel and Sankar Raman on July 25, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Uddin discusses his family background and early life in Maungdaw, Burma, in the 1960s and 1970s, including the relationship between Rohingya Muslims and Rakhine Buddhists. He describes the deterioration in the status of Rohingya Muslims after the 1982 change to the Burmese constitution that rescinded their citizenship, and talks about his experience in college in Rangoon, including his involvement in student organizations for Rohingya rights. He also discusses the history of oppression of the Rohingya, and describes the oppression he and his family experienced in the 1980s and 1990s. He speaks about coming to the United States on a student visa, and about his experiences living and studying in Pendleton, Oregon. He talks about the process of receiving asylum. He discusses his experiences at Portland State University, and as the only Rohingya in Portland until 2005. He also talks about his marriage and the process of getting a green card for his wife. He discusses jobs he held, including running a gas station with his wife in Salem, Oregon. He closes the interview by talking about his work to help other Rohingya refugees, and by sharing his thoughts about the future of the Rohingya people.

Uddin, Reza, 1964-

Oral history interview with Miguel Rodriguez [Sound Recording 02]

Session 1, Part 2. This oral history interview with Miguel Rodriguez was conducted by David Lipoff on July 16, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Rodriguez discusses his sister’s injury, which led the family to leave Mexico and seek medical treatment in the United States; shares their reasons for staying; and talks about the legal barriers that prevented them from receiving U.S. citizenship. He discusses his early life in Los Angeles, California; his relationship with his father and step-father; and moving to Roseburg to live near his step-father’s family. He talks about the financial hardship that led his mother and step-father to return to Los Angeles, about attending Umpqua Community College, and about the deaths of some of his family members in L.A. He speaks at length about the limitations on his life and the feelings of vulnerability caused by his status as an undocumented immigrant. He talks about the positive effect that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy had on his life, including the ability to find a job and attend Portland State University. He then talks about getting a green card along with his mother under the Violence Against Women Act. He speaks about his cultural and ethnic identity. He talks about his work as a college access coach at Madison High School, about his reasons for volunteering with AmeriCorps, and about difficult conversations with his conservative grandfather. He shares his hopes and plans for the future and talks about his career goals. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement in non-profit organizations focused on the Latino community, particularly the organization Portland Through a Latinx Lens.

Rodriguez, Miguel, 1993-

Oral history interview with Miguel Rodriguez [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1, Part 1. This oral history interview with Miguel Rodriguez was conducted by David Lipoff on July 16, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Rodriguez discusses his sister’s injury, which led the family to leave Mexico and seek medical treatment in the United States; shares their reasons for staying; and talks about the legal barriers that prevented them from receiving U.S. citizenship. He discusses his early life in Los Angeles, California; his relationship with his father and step-father; and moving to Roseburg to live near his step-father’s family. He talks about the financial hardship that led his mother and step-father to return to Los Angeles, about attending Umpqua Community College, and about the deaths of some of his family members in L.A. He speaks at length about the limitations on his life and the feelings of vulnerability caused by his status as an undocumented immigrant. He talks about the positive effect that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy had on his life, including the ability to find a job and attend Portland State University. He then talks about getting a green card along with his mother under the Violence Against Women Act. He speaks about his cultural and ethnic identity. He talks about his work as a college access coach at Madison High School, about his reasons for volunteering with AmeriCorps, and about difficult conversations with his conservative grandfather. He shares his hopes and plans for the future and talks about his career goals. He closes the interview by talking about his involvement in non-profit organizations focused on the Latino community, particularly the organization Portland Through a Latinx Lens.

Rodriguez, Miguel, 1993-

Oral history interview with Liliana Luna [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Liliana Luna was conducted by Dora Totoian and Sankar Raman on July 12, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Luna discusses her early life in Mexico City, Michoacán, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, including her family life, her education, and the houses her family lived in. She describes the dangers of life in the border town of Nuevo Laredo, and shares the reasons her family came to Portland, Oregon, in 2005. She speaks about her experience as an undocumented immigrant. She talks about adjusting to life in the United States, about her experience in high school, and about racism she experienced. She discusses studying at Portland Community College; talks about her involvement with Oregon Dream Activists, an organization that advocates for rights for undocumented immigrants; and speaks about her participation in the 2012 May Day protest in Portland, in which she was arrested. She talks about her experiences studying at Portland State University as a person of color and an undocumented immigrant, shares her plans for the future, and speaks at length about her activism. She talks about her accomplishments, and shares her opinion about American culture. She closes the interview by discussing the experience of immigrants during the presidency of Donald Trump, and by discussing the abolition of borders.

Luna, Liliana, 1990-

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Vince Whiting was conducted by Kim L. Andrews from July 1 to December 2, 2019, at the Brookwood branch of the Washington County Public Library in Hillsboro, Oregon. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on July 1, 2019, Whiting discusses the life and career of his first wife, Pat Whiting. He talks about her education at San Jose State University and their early marriage. He discusses his own education at San Jose State University, Chico State University, and Oregon State University and his plan to become a veterinarian. He also briefly talks about his wife at the time of the interview, Amira Whiting. He discusses Pat Whiting's service in the Oregon State Legislature, including her work on legislation regarding the ban of chlorofluorocarbons, and describes her personality. Whiting briefly discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois. He then talks about moving to Oregon with Pat Whiting around 1968, and his career with GlaxoSmithKline. He discusses Pat Whiting's political philosophy and speaks at length about her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and how she interacted with her constituents. He speaks about the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, her interest in environmentalism, and the environmental legislation she worked on.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 2, 2019, Whiting discusses the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, the barriers she faced as a Filipina, and her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives. He describes how she communicated with her constituents and her priorities as a legislator, particularly regarding the environment. He discusses Pat Whiting's views on and experience with abortion, as well as her views on birth control. He talks about internships that Pat Whiting started and her legislative and community work regarding education, as well as her work on an Oregon smoking ban. He discusses Pat Whiting's work after leaving the Legislature in 1979, including her involvement with various organizations and charities, particularly Loaves and Fishes, Dress for Success, and Project Independence. He talks about her work towards community policing and her advocacy of helmet laws. He closes the interview by talking about the reasons why Pat Whiting left the Oregon Legislature and reflects on her accomplishments.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

Oral history interview with Vince Whiting [Session 01]

In the first interview session, conducted on July 1, 2019, Whiting discusses the life and career of his first wife, Pat Whiting. He talks about her education at San Jose State University and their early marriage. He discusses his own education at San Jose State University, Chico State University, and Oregon State University and his plan to become a veterinarian. He also briefly talks about his wife at the time of the interview, Amira Whiting. He discusses Pat Whiting’s service in the Oregon State Legislature, including her work on legislation regarding the ban of chlorofluorocarbons, and describes her personality. Whiting briefly discusses his family background and early life in Chicago, Illinois. He then talks about moving to Oregon with Pat Whiting around 1968, and his career with GlaxoSmithKline. He discusses Pat Whiting’s political philosophy and speaks at length about her 1972 campaign for the Oregon House of Representatives and how she interacted with her constituents. He speaks about the reasons Pat Whiting entered politics, her interest in environmentalism, and the environmental legislation she worked on.

Whiting, R. Vince (Roy Vincent), 1946-

Oral history interview with Naskah Zada [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Naskah Zada was conducted by Dora Totoian and Sankar Raman on June 27, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Zada discusses her family background and early life as a Kurd in Sangasar, Iraq. She describes the destruction of her hometown by the Iraqi Army in 1988, and talks about living in the camp near Mosul where her family was forced to relocate. She also shares her memories of life during the Iran-Iraq War, and talks about bigotry that she experienced. She speaks at length about a childhood friend who inspired her to become a feminist, and who was later murdered in an honor killing. She discusses her experiences at the University of Sulaimani, including her ongoing education in feminist issues. She shares the reasons her family was evacuated by the U.S. military in 1996 as part of Operation Pacific Haven, describes the journey, and talks about adjusting to life in Portland, Oregon. She discusses learning English, jobs she worked, and her education. She describes racism she experienced in Portland. She speaks at length about her first marriage, discusses working in radio broadcasting in Washington, D.C., and shares her reasons for returning to Portland. She speaks about The Zada Show, her YouTube show focusing on Middle East news and culture. She reflects on the challenges she faced, discusses her preference for the both-sides news style, and closes the interview by talking about her plans for the future.

Zada, Naskah

Oral history interview with Elijah Russell [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Elijah Russell was conducted by Sankar Raman and Allison Merkel on June 26, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Russell discusses his family background and early life in Hamburg, Germany, including the music careers of his parents, and the reasons he and his mother moved to Portland, Oregon, in 2005. He talks about growing up with a famous father, about writing music, and about his education in Germany and Beaverton. He shares his experiences as a Black person in both Germany and Portland, and speaks at length about starting a school club called Kids of Color. He talks about writing songs, plays some of his music, and discusses his musical ambitions. He talks about his plans for college, about sharing music with his father, and about his identity. He closes the interview by discussing plans for the future.

Russell, Elijah, 2001-

Oral history interview with Susheela Jayapal [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Susheela Jayapal was conducted by Sankar Raman on June 1, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. Monica Salazar was also present.

In this interview, Jayapal discusses her family background and early life in India, Singapore, and in Jakarta, Indonesia, including her education. She talks about her reasons for going to the United States for college, and shares her experiences as an international student studying economics at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. She talks about working for Goldman Sachs in New York State after graduating, then shares her experiences studying law at the University of Chicago. She also discusses the availability of Indian cuisine in the U.S. She talks about practicing law in San Francisco, California, about her marriage to Bradley Stuart Miller, and about raising biracial children in Portland, Oregon. She then talks about working as a lawyer for Adidas, shares her reasons for quitting in 2000, and discusses her involvement in several non-profit organizations in Portland. She shares her reasons for running for the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners in 2017, talks about her campaign, and discusses the issues she plans to address while in office, including housing. She closes the interview by talking about communicating with her constituents, and about encouraging more Indian Americans to run for office.

Jayapal, Susheela, 1962-

Oral history interview with Anna Giurgiev [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Anna Giurgiev was conducted by Caitlyn Malik and Sankar Raman on June 7, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. One of Giurgiev's daughters, Vesna Giurgiev, was also present.

In this interview, Giurgiev discusses her family background and early life in communist Romania, including working on a farm, her education, and the national athletics program. She speaks about her marriage to Sava Giurgiev and describes their wedding. She talks about rationing and traveling to Yugoslavia to buy food. She describes Sava Giurgiev's flight from Romania and talks about reuniting with him in Chicago, Illinois. She describes the process of getting a visa to the United States. She also looks at photographs and talks about them. She talks about adjusting to life in the U.S., about earning her nursing degree, and about working in Chicago and in Florida. She then talks about the reasons the family moved to the Portland, Oregon, area. She closes the interview by reflecting on her experiences as a Romanian immigrant and talking about her hopes for her children.

Giurgiev, Anna, 1958-

Oral history interview with Jenny Munezero [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Jenny Munezero was conducted by Julianna Robidoux and Sankar Raman on May 2, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Munezero discusses her family background and early life as a Burundian refugee in the Kanembwa refugee camp in Tanzania. She describes living conditions in the camp, her family life, and her education. She describes the dangers of the camp, discusses her father's business, and talks about the process of resettlement in the United States. She speaks about adjusting to life in Beaverton, Oregon, including her experience during her first Independence Day; talks about her high school and college education in the U.S.; and discusses her career after graduating with a degree in business management from Portland State University. She talks about her relationship with her fiance, Innocent Irakoze, and closes the interview by sharing advice for other immigrants and her plans for the future.

Munezero, Jenny, 1993-

Oral history interview with Gitanjali J. Hursh [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1, Part 1. This oral history interview with Gitanjali J. Hursh was conducted by Elayna Yussen on April 15, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Hursh discusses her family background and early life as a biracial second-generation Indian American. She also talks about her mother's immigration to the United States in 1973, as well as her mother's adjustment to life in the U.S. She talks about her family's frequent moves during her childhood, speaks about her early interest in music and dance, and discusses making friends in new schools. She speaks about her mother's life, career, and cultural background. She talks about her cultural and ethnic identity during her early life, and about connecting to her Indian cultural heritage in her 20s. She talks about studying art at Portland State University, and discusses working various jobs. She describes how she first got into being a DJ while helping to organize workers at Powell's Books into the ILWU Local 5 union. She speaks about her partnership with Stephen Strausbaugh to form the duo of DJ Anjali and the Incredible Kid; describes the music scene in Portland during the late 1990s and early 2000s; and talks about the enduring popularity of the duo's monthly Desi dance party, ANDAZ. She describes how the party has changed since its early days at the Fez Ballroom, talks about other dance parties that they play, and discusses her plans for the future. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement in the Portland Indian community, offering advice on negotiating wages, and talking about challenges she faced during her career.

Hursh, Gitanjali J. (Gitanjali Jacqueline), 1973-

Oral history interview with Gitanjali J. Hursh [Sound Recording 02]

Session 1, Part 2. This oral history interview with Gitanjali J. Hursh was conducted by Elayna Yussen on April 15, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Hursh discusses her family background and early life as a biracial second-generation Indian American. She also talks about her mother's immigration to the United States in 1973, as well as her mother's adjustment to life in the U.S. She talks about her family's frequent moves during her childhood, speaks about her early interest in music and dance, and discusses making friends in new schools. She speaks about her mother's life, career, and cultural background. She talks about her cultural and ethnic identity during her early life, and about connecting to her Indian cultural heritage in her 20s. She talks about studying art at Portland State University, and discusses working various jobs. She describes how she first got into being a DJ while helping to organize workers at Powell's Books into the ILWU Local 5 union. She speaks about her partnership with Stephen Strausbaugh to form the duo of DJ Anjali and the Incredible Kid; describes the music scene in Portland during the late 1990s and early 2000s; and talks about the enduring popularity of the duo's monthly Desi dance party, ANDAZ. She describes how the party has changed since its early days at the Fez Ballroom, talks about other dance parties that they play, and discusses her plans for the future. She closes the interview by discussing her involvement in the Portland Indian community, offering advice on negotiating wages, and talking about challenges she faced during her career.

Hursh, Gitanjali J. (Gitanjali Jacqueline), 1973-

Oral history interview with Sivheng Ung [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1, Part 1. This oral history interview with Sivheng Ung was conducted by Elizabeth Mehren and Sankar Raman on March 25, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Ung discusses her family background and early life in Battambang, Cambodia, describes a happy and affluent childhood, and talks about her education. She describes the rise of the communist rebels who would become the Khmer Rouge during the 1960s and 1970s. She speaks about living in Phnom Penh in the early 1970s, about her marriage in 1974, and about the Khmer Rouge takeover of the capital in 1975. She speaks at length about her experiences during the forced march of Phnom Penh residents to a labor camp, talks about conditions in the camp, and describes what they did to survive. She gives a detailed account of her attempt to escape with her husband, and talks about their eventual capture and imprisonment, which led to the murder of her husband and a miscarriage around 1977. She describes her months-long illness and depression following these losses, her continued ordeal during the Khmer Rouge regime, and the horrors she witnessed over the next years. She talks about returning to Battambang and reuniting with her surviving family after Pol Pot was overthrown. She then describes her successful escape to Thailand with her brother and her future husband in 1979, talks about living in a refugee camp, and describes the process of immigrating to the United States. She shares how her traumatic experiences in Cambodia affected her ability to adjust to life in the U.S. and Portland, Oregon. She talks about her marriage to Van Touch in 1984, about the education, family, and career of her younger brother, and about jobs she and her husband worked. She closes the interview by sharing her reasons for talking about her experiences, including the death of her son, and talks about what she hopes others learn from her story.

Ung, Sivheng, 1951-

Oral history interview with Sivheng Ung [Sound Recording 02]

Session 1, Part 2. This oral history interview with Sivheng Ung was conducted by Elizabeth Mehren and Sankar Raman on March 25, 2019. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States.

In this interview, Ung discusses her family background and early life in Battambang, Cambodia, describes a happy and affluent childhood, and talks about her education. She describes the rise of the communist rebels who would become the Khmer Rouge during the 1960s and 1970s. She speaks about living in Phnom Penh in the early 1970s, about her marriage in 1974, and about the Khmer Rouge takeover of the capital in 1975. She speaks at length about her experiences during the forced march of Phnom Penh residents to a labor camp, talks about conditions in the camp, and describes what they did to survive. She gives a detailed account of her attempt to escape with her husband, and talks about their eventual capture and imprisonment, which led to the murder of her husband and a miscarriage around 1977. She describes her months-long illness and depression following these losses, her continued ordeal during the Khmer Rouge regime, and the horrors she witnessed over the next years. She talks about returning to Battambang and reuniting with her surviving family after Pol Pot was overthrown. She then describes her successful escape to Thailand with her brother and her future husband in 1979, talks about living in a refugee camp, and describes the process of immigrating to the United States. She shares how her traumatic experiences in Cambodia affected her ability to adjust to life in the U.S. and Portland, Oregon. She talks about her marriage to Van Touch in 1984, about the education, family, and career of her younger brother, and about jobs she and her husband worked. She closes the interview by sharing her reasons for talking about her experiences, including the death of her son, and talks about what she hopes others learn from her story.

Ung, Sivheng, 1951-

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