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Mss 114-3

Consists of general correspondence, primarily political and military in nature, legal papers, and a survey of an unidentified Indian reservation.

Religion, faith, and worship

Photographs, circa 1920 to 1940, of people, places, objects, and activities related to religion, faith, and worship, predominantly Christian. Approximately half the images are portraits of clergy and places of worship, some of which are unidentified. The photographs also document events and activities, including the Marian Congress, held in Portland from August 12-15, 1934, at the Sanctuary of Our Sorrowful Mother (The Grotto) in Portland; processions at St. Mary's Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, both in Portland; and baptism ceremonies in the Columbia River.

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Events

Photographs related to social and civic events, predominantly unidentified. Events depicted include weddings, parties, banquets, ceremonies, and dedications.

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Vanport Flood photographs

Photographs of the damage caused by the Vanport Flood in May 1948 taken by Jerry Jiro Yasutome and other unidentified students at the Northwest School of Photography in Portland, Oregon.

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Oral history interview with Randy W. Hardy

This oral history interview with Randy W. Hardy was conducted by Michael O'Rourke from June 11 to September 10, 2002. The interview was conducted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council Oral History Project, which documented the history and purpose of the Northwest Power Planning Council, now known as the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The interview was conducted in two sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted in Portland, Oregon, on June 11, 2002, Hardy discusses his family background and early life in a military family. He speaks at length about his career in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War, and shares his opinion about the war. He talks about his graduate studies in public affairs at the University of Washington, about his marriage to Jane Van Leuven, and about his reasons for leaving the Navy. He discusses his work with the Federal Energy Administration in the late 1970s.

In the second interview session, conducted in Spokane, Washington, on September 10, 2002, Hardy continues to discuss his work with the Federal Energy Administration in the late 1970s, and talks about the passage of the 1980 Northwest Power Act. He speaks at length about the development and failure of the Washington Public Power Supply System, talks about the management of the Bonneville Power Administration in the 1980s, and about the relationship between the Northwest Power Planning Council and the BPA. He then speaks at length about his work as executive director of the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee. He also talks about serving as superintendent of Seattle City Light, shares his thoughts about the NWPPC's model conservation standards, and speaks at length about his service as CEO of the BPA in the 1990s. He also discusses the effects of the deregulation of electric utilities, talks about how changing state politics in the 1990s affected the work of the NWPPC, and speculates about the future of energy utilities in the Pacific Northwest. He closes the interview by talking about his activities since leaving the BPA in 1997.

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Oral history interview with Tim Wapato

This oral history interview with Tim Wapato was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Portland, Oregon, from August 4 to November 16, 2002. The interview was conducted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council Oral History Project, which documented the history and purpose of the Northwest Power Planning Council, now known as the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The interview was conducted in three sessions. Session 2 begins partway through Tape 2, Side 1.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 4, 2002, Wapato discusses his family background and early life in the Methow Valley, Washington, including his father's work as an Evangelical minister and his high school experiences. He briefly talks about his college experiences, about working as a smokejumper, and about his U.S. Army service. He then speaks about his 21-year career in the Los Angeles Police Department. He talks about serving as a commissioner on the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission from 1979 to 1980, and discusses setting up a fishery enforcement unit, and case law regarding Native American fishing rights.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 5, 2002, Wapato discusses his service as executive director of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission from 1980 to 1989. He talks about working with the directors of the Oregon and Washington fishery departments, discusses working with the Northwest Power Planning Council on the fish and wildlife plan and on developing the water budget, and speaks at length about his work negotiating the U.S.-Canada Pacific Salmon Treaty. He also talks about lobbying Congress to include fishery protections in the 1980 Northwest Power Act.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on November 16, 2002, Wapato speaks further about lobbying Congress to include fishery protections in the 1980 Northwest Power Act. He then continues to discuss serving as executive director of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, and to talk about working with the NWPPC. He speaks at length about his working relationship with several NWPPC members, particularly Dan Evans and Kai Lee. He also talks about working with the Bonneville Power Administration, about the commission's lawyer, John Platt, and about his reasons for leaving the commission. He closes the interview by briefly discussing his service as commissioner for the Administration for Native Americans and as director of the Indian Gaming Association.

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Sketchbook vol. 2

Primarily contains pencil sketches, with some watercolor and colored pencil. Sketches are predominantly landscape scenes, particularly coastal scenes, and include identified locations in Oregon, Washington, and California; among these are Tongue Point, Tillamook Head, views from Saddle Mountain, Cape Disappointment, and Santa Barbara.

Sketchbook vol. 8

Contains watercolor and pencil botanical sketches and one landscape scene. Identified locations of the flower sketches are primarily in California, with a small number in Oregon.

Oral history interview with Richard F. Berg

This oral history interview with Richard F. Berg was conducted by Leigh Coffey in August 1996. The interview was conducted as part of the Legacy of Hope: Catholics and Social Justice Project, which collected interviews with Catholic clergy members in Oregon about their work on social action in the Roman Catholic tradition. The interview was conducted in three sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 2, 1996, Berg discusses his family background and talks about how his family influenced his spirituality. He discusses his early life in Portland, Oregon, and speaks about his sisters, their families, and their careers. He also shares his childhood experiences during World War II while his father worked as chief surgeon at a military hospital at Fort Ord, California. He speaks about his decision to go to seminary and shares his experiences at the seminary at Notre Dame University. He also talks about fundraising for the March of Dimes as a teenager and about what the experience taught him about generosity. He then discusses a trip to Guatemala after he became a priest and talks about his work in Texas with youth struggling with drug addiction.

In the second interview session, conducted on August 3, 1996, Berg further discusses his early life in Portland and talks about his relationship with Catholicism during his youth, including in his schooling and at home. He shares his thoughts about the inclusivity of the Catholic Church. He talks about his service as pastor for the St. Andre Parish, also known as the Downtown Chapel, and speaks at length about his work with people experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder, drug addiction, and homelessness. He talks about his involvement with the Northwest Neighborhood Association and about life in the neighborhood. He speaks about his experience during a trip to Japan in 1987.

In the third and final interview session, conducted in August 1996, Berg discusses his mentors in the Catholic Church and talks about their work. He shares his strategies for maintaining enthusiasm for new projects, and speaks about his work with the MacDonald Center, now the Maybelle Center for Community, an organization dedicated to building community for people who are socially isolated. He talks about counseling draftees during the Vietnam War in Texas, and speaks further about his work with people with post-traumatic stress disorder. He shares his thoughts on the Catholic Church's stance on homosexuality, talks about social justice issues that he believes the church should address, particularly poverty, and closes the interview by describing the concept of "social mercy."

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Oral history interview with James K. Logan

This oral history interview with James K. Logan was conducted by Toni R. Black Cloud in Portland, Oregon, over three sessions from April 12 to May 23, 2002, as part of the Radical Elders oral history series. The interview was conducted as part of a senior capstone class on history at Portland State University, with instructor Sandy Polishuk. The sound quality during session 2 is very poor, and during session 3, the tape recorder malfunctioned.

In the first interview session, conducted on April 12, 2002, Logan discusses his family background and early life on the Washington coast. He describes family life with an abusive, alcoholic father and shares his memories of the murder of his father in 1969. He discusses his experiences in the foster care system in Oregon, and describes how he became homeless at age 12. He speaks at length about his experience as a homeless teenager in Portland during the 1970s, describes the dangers and stress of that life, and talks about his experiences with police and the justice system as an unhoused person. He discusses his six-year incarceration in MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, talks about his alcoholism and drug addiction, and discusses his later experiences being incarcerated in his 20s. He then speaks about his efforts to get sober, about his involvement with the American Indian Movement, and about his relationships with women.

In the second interview session, conducted on May 9, 2002, Logan speaks further about his experiences as a homeless teenager and talks about his work mentoring youth gang members. He speaks further about his involvement with the American Indian Movement, talks about connecting to his Native American heritage, and describes discrimination he experienced as a person of color. He talks about attending pow-wows.

In the third and final interview session, conducted on May 23, 2002, Logan continues to discuss attending pow-wows and talks about the spiritual significance of playing drums. He speaks further about getting sober in 1989, and also about his involvement with the American Indian Movement. He describes his experiences working in the sobriety program at Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, Inc. He talks about his sister, who had also experienced homelessness as a teenager. He speaks about going through the 12-step sobriety program. He talks about his work history in roofing and construction, discusses racism he experienced, and speaks at length about his relationship with his children and their mothers. He closes the interview by talking about his civil rights activism, and about his health.

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Oral history interview with Ree F. Adkins

This oral history interview with Ree F. Adkins was conducted by Lynn Taylor at Adkins’ home in Vancouver, Washington, on June 2, 1981. In this interview, Adkins discusses her family background and early life in Hardman, Oregon. She talks about her career as a teacher, about her experience during the Depression, and about her marriage to Conser L. Adkins. She describes how she came to work as an electrician at the Kaiser shipyards in Vancouver, Washington, during World War II, and shares her experiences as a woman worker in the shipyards. She talks about her job duties, about the people she worked with, and about the protective clothing she wore. She discusses her living conditions during the war, her commute to the shipyards, and briefly working in the cafeteria at the Kaiser hospital. She describes a typical day during the time she worked in the shipyards, talks about her life after the end of the war, and shares her thoughts about women in the workforce.

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