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Norr, Roy (Photographer) Portland (Or.)
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Bank of British Columbia building, Front and Ankeny, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the Bank of British Columbia building at Front and Ankeny streets in downtown Portland. The building is three stories and has arched windows. Wooden barriers block off the front of the building, and a crane is parked at left. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Bank of British Columbia bldg Front & Ankeny, Portland’s second bank.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Side view of entrance to Kamm Block, Pine Street, Portland

Photograph, taken from the side, showing the exterior of the ornate entrance to the Kamm block on Pine Street (now Southwest Pine Street) between Front and First in Portland. Above the doorway is a balcony; just below the balcony are two male figures carved to look as though they are supporting the balcony on their backs. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Attractive entry to Kamm Block built in 1884.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, and 371N5470, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Carstens Packing Company, Front Street, Portland

Photograph, taken from across the street, showing a truck parked outside a three-story brick building on Front Street between Stark and Washington in downtown Portland. A sign on the front of the building reads “Carstens Packing Co.” A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Original home of Ladd & Tilton Bank on Front Street / The first two stories were Portland’s first brick building / Built in 1853.” Wharton reported that the third story had been added later. See related image Nos. 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Esmond rooming house, Front and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing a four-story building on Front and Morrison streets (now Southwest Morrison Street) in Portland. The building has bay windows on the second and third floors. On the ground floor is a sign for Oregon Sheet Metal Works. The 1905 Morrison Bridge is partially visible in the background. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Last wing of the New Esmond Hotel - Front & Morrison Sts.” The story reported that the hotel opened in 1878, but only the portion of the building shown in this photograph remained in 1928, and it operated as the Esmond rooming house. See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

St. Charles Hotel building, Front and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the St. Charles Hotel building at Front and Morrison (now Southwest Morrison Street) in Portland. The four-story building is brick and has arched windows and a mansard roof. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “St. Charles Hotel, Front & Morrison, finest of Portland’s hotels when built in 1869.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Rankin brothers’ On-to-Oregon and Shell Oil plane conducting aerial refueling test

Aerial photograph showing a Shell Oil monoplane transferring fuel to a Stinson monoplane, the On-To-Oregon, over the Portland area on Saturday, August 16, 1930. A person, probably Dick Rankin, is waving from the top of the On-To-Oregon. The Shell plane was flown by W. G. Fletcher and the On-To-Oregon was flown by Tex Rankin. The aerial refueling was a test run before the first of four unsuccessful attempts by Tex Rankin and his brothers, Dick and Dud Rankin, to set an endurance flying record that month. A cropped and partially masked version of this photograph appears to have been published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 17, 1930. The photograph was published under the headline “Three Times Daily—For How Long?” It had the following caption: “Air picture taken by Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, of the refueling rehearsal act Saturday between a Shell Oil plane and the On-to-Oregon endurance plane of the Rankin brothers. They expect to do this three times a day on the flight, which is scheduled to start at 10 o’clock this morning.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the refueling test and and plans for the endurance flight. Also see image Nos. 371N6017, 371N6022, 371N6023, 371N6024, 371N6025, 371N6060, 371N6064, 371N6103, 371N6120, 371N6121, 371N6128, 371N6129, 371N6130, 371N6132, 371N6133, 371N6134, 371N6138, 371N6206, 371N6207, 371N6221, 371N6227, 371N6228, 371N6233, and 371N6234. Image note: Damaged negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Building at First and Alder, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of a three-story building at the corner of 1st and Alder streets (now Southwest 1st Avenue and Southwest Alder Street) in Portland. The building has a mansard roof and arched windows on the upper stories. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Once occupied by Emil Weber’s gambling hall / Now used as P E P Co’s [Portland Electric Power Company’s] interurban station.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

U. S. Navy dirigible Akron over Portland

Aerial photograph of the United States Navy dirigible Akron in flight above Portland on May 24, 1932. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on May 24, 1932, under the headline “U. S. S. Akron, Early Morning Visitor Here, Flying Over Swan Island.” The photograph had the following caption: “Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, in an airplane flown by Tex Rankin, caught the giant naval dirigible, U. S. S. Akron, as she poked her nose over Swan Island airport. The great aircraft gave Portlanders a thrill as she flew directly over the city, but they saw her under body only. The Akron is 785 feet long, weighs 403,000 pounds, and has 6,300,000 cubic feet gas volume. The ship has eight motors, totaling 4480 horsepower, and can make 83.8 miles an hour at top speed.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the Akron’s visit. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to negative damage.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

New Market Theatre building, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the New Market Theater building in downtown Portland and several cars parked on the street. On the ground floor is the Multnomah Hotel Garage car-repair shop. The building is bordered by Southwest 1st and 2nd avenues and Southwest Ash and Ankeny streets. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Entrance to Newmarket Building / First Street / Portland’s finest theatre from 1872 to 1885.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Parrish building, Front and Washington, Portland

Photograph showing two trucks parked outside the three-story Parrish building at Front and Washington (now Southwest Washington Street) in Portland. On the ground floor are signs for the Western Fruit & Produce Company and the Tri-State Produce Company. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Southwest corner Front & Washington streets. Site of the first post office [in Portland].” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)