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Isaac L. Patterson at desk in governor’s office, looking at documents

Portrait of Oregon Governor Isaac L. Patterson sitting at a desk in the executive’s office at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem in January 1927. He is facing to the left and looking at a document he is holding. The name “Patterson” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image. See related image Nos. 371N1961, 371N1963, 371N1964, 371N1966, 371N1968, and 371N1969.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Isaac L. Patterson at desk in governor’s office

Portrait of Oregon Governor Isaac L. Patterson sitting at a desk in the executive’s office at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem in January 1927. He is facing front and holding a document. The name “Patterson” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image. See related image Nos. 371N1959, 371N1963, 371N1964, 371N1966, 371N1968, and 371N1969.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Governor Isaac L. Patterson, Walter M. Pierce, and Henry L. Corbett at Patterson’s inauguration

Photograph showing (in back row, from left) Oregon Governor Isaac L. Patterson; outgoing Governor Walter M. Pierce; and state Senate President Henry L. Corbett at the head of the Hall of Representatives at the Oregon State Capitol during Patterson’s inauguration on Monday, January 10, 1927. A group of unidentified men is standing in the foreground. Image note: The text “Pierce + Patterson” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image. See related image No. 371N1965.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Walter M. Pierce gesturing to Isaac L. Patterson to take seat at governor’s desk

Portrait of incoming governor Isaac L. Patterson (left) and outgoing governor Walter M. Pierce standing next to the desk in the governor’s office at the Oregon State Capitol in January 1927. Patterson has one hand on the back of the desk chair, and Pierce is gesturing toward the chair. A cropped version of this photograph was one of five, including image No. 371N1968, that were published on Page 22 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, January 11, 1927, the day after Patterson’s inauguration. The photographs were published under the headline “With the Preliminaries Concluded.” This photograph had the following caption: “Ex-Governor Pierce bids his successor, Governor Patterson, be seated.” See additional related image Nos. 371N1959, 371N1961, 371N1964, 371N1966, and 371N1969. Image note: The text “Pierce + Patterson” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Walter M. Pierce sitting at desk in governor’s office; Isaac L. Patterson in background

Portrait showing outgoing Oregon Governor Walter M. Pierce sitting at the desk in the governor’s office at the Oregon State Capitol. He is in profile, facing to the right. He is looking down at a document on the desk and holding a pen. Seated in the background is incoming Governor Isaac L. Patterson. The number 5 and the name “Pierce” are written on the negative and are visible in the image. See related image Nos. 371N1959, 371N1961, 371N1963, 371N1966, 371N1968, and 371N1969.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Isaac L. Patterson taking oath of office as Oregon governor

Photograph showing Isaac L. Patterson (back, second from left) being sworn in as Oregon governor as outgoing Governor Walter M. Pierce, state Senate president Henry L. Corbett, and others watch. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, January 11, 1927, under the headline “Governor Takes Oath of Office.” The photograph had the following caption: Chief Justice [George H.] Burnett administering the oath of office as governor of Oregon to I. L. Patterson in the hall of representatives, state house, Salem, Monday afternoon. Left to right—Chief Justice Burnett, Governor Patterson, ex-Governor Pierce, Henry L. Corbett, president of the state senate.” Image note: The text “Pierce + Patterson” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the right side of the image. See related image No. 371N1962.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Walter M. Pierce and Isaac L. Patterson in governor’s office, Oregon State Capitol

Portrait of outgoing governor Walter M. Pierce (left) and his successor, Isaac L. Patterson, in the governor’s office at the Oregon State Capitol. Patterson is sitting at the desk in the office and is looking at a document in front of him. Pierce is standing beside Patterson and pointing at the document. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, January 10, 1927, the day Patterson was inaugurated. The photograph was published under the headline “Change of State Pilots” and had the following caption: “Walter M. Pierce turns over desk in executive office of the state capitol which he has occupied as governor for the past four years to his successor, Isaac L. Patterson.” The photograph accompanied two stories, one headlined “Patterson Becomes Governor,” and the other headlined “Patterson - Pierce Messages Afford Striking Parallels.” See related image Nos. 371N1959, 371N1961, 371N1963, 371N1964, 371N1968, and 371N1969. Image note: The text “Patterson + Pierce” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Governor Isaac L. Patterson and Walter M. Pierce shaking hands

Photograph showing new Oregon Governor Isaac L. Patterson (left) and his predecessor, Walter M. Pierce, shaking hands outside the Oregon State Capitol. A cropped version of this photograph was one of five, including image No. 371N1963, that were published on Page 22 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, January 11, 1927, the day after Patterson’s inauguration. The photographs were published under the headline “With the Preliminaries Concluded.” This photograph had the following caption: “‘Good-by Walter. Good luck, Ike.’” See additional related image Nos. 371N1959, 371N1961, 371N1964, 371N1966, and 371N1969. The text “Pierce + Patterson” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Isaac L. Patterson and Walter M. Pierce in governor’s office, Oregon State Capitol

Photograph showing incoming Oregon Governor Isaac L. Patterson and his predecessor, Walter M. Pierce, in the governor’s office at the Oregon State Capitol in January 1927. Patterson is sitting at the desk in the office, and Pierce is standing beside him with one hand on the back of the chair. The two men are looking at one another. The text “Pierce + Patterson” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. See related image Nos. 371N1959, 371N1961, 371N1963, 371N1964, 371N1966, and 371N1968.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Crew of wrecked steamship Laurel

Group portrait of eleven crew members from the steamship Laurel, which wrecked on Peacock Spit near the mouth of the Columbia River on Sunday, June 16, 1929. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the ship, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Monday, June 17, 1929, with the following caption: "Photo taken on deck of coast guard cutter Redwing this morning by Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, showing group of those rescued from the Laurel; they are, front row, left to right, (all kneeling) James H. Miller, C. H. Salenjus, Kenneth McNaught, C. C. Morrison; back row, left to right, N. Martincivie, Joseph Meyers, J. C. Cavanaugh, Dewey Wilcott, William Oden, Bob Haley and A. Wilde. Four other survivors were in the hospital, three more were exhausted and could not be disturbed to be photographed." Image note: The text “Crew of Laurel” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and Buck Lieuallen after Hickman’s capture

Photograph of Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and State Traffic Officer Buck Lieuallen in Pendleton, probably on December 22, 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, December 23, 1927. The photograph was published under the headline and subhead "Doubling Back Was Fatal to Fugitive / Conclusion of Manhunt That Reached Over the Entire Length of Pacific Coast." The photograph had the following caption: "Above, left to right, Tom Gurdane, Pendleton chief of police, captor; William Edward Hickman, prisoner; Traffic Sergeant Buck Lieuallen, captor." Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, and 373G0076.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

U. S. Navy dirigible Akron over Portland

Aerial photograph of the United States Navy dirigible Akron in flight above Portland on May 24, 1932. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on May 24, 1932, under the headline “U. S. S. Akron, Early Morning Visitor Here, Flying Over Swan Island.” The photograph had the following caption: “Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, in an airplane flown by Tex Rankin, caught the giant naval dirigible, U. S. S. Akron, as she poked her nose over Swan Island airport. The great aircraft gave Portlanders a thrill as she flew directly over the city, but they saw her under body only. The Akron is 785 feet long, weighs 403,000 pounds, and has 6,300,000 cubic feet gas volume. The ship has eight motors, totaling 4480 horsepower, and can make 83.8 miles an hour at top speed.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the Akron’s visit. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to negative damage.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Carstens Packing Company, Front Street, Portland

Photograph, taken from across the street, showing a truck parked outside a three-story brick building on Front Street between Stark and Washington in downtown Portland. A sign on the front of the building reads “Carstens Packing Co.” A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Original home of Ladd & Tilton Bank on Front Street / The first two stories were Portland’s first brick building / Built in 1853.” Wharton reported that the third story had been added later. See related image Nos. 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Esmond rooming house, Front and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing a four-story building on Front and Morrison streets (now Southwest Morrison Street) in Portland. The building has bay windows on the second and third floors. On the ground floor is a sign for Oregon Sheet Metal Works. The 1905 Morrison Bridge is partially visible in the background. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Last wing of the New Esmond Hotel - Front & Morrison Sts.” The story reported that the hotel opened in 1878, but only the portion of the building shown in this photograph remained in 1928, and it operated as the Esmond rooming house. See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

St. Charles Hotel building, Front and Morrison, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the St. Charles Hotel building at Front and Morrison (now Southwest Morrison Street) in Portland. The four-story building is brick and has arched windows and a mansard roof. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “St. Charles Hotel, Front & Morrison, finest of Portland’s hotels when built in 1869.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

New Market Theatre building, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the New Market Theater building in downtown Portland and several cars parked on the street. On the ground floor is the Multnomah Hotel Garage car-repair shop. The building is bordered by Southwest 1st and 2nd avenues and Southwest Ash and Ankeny streets. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Entrance to Newmarket Building / First Street / Portland’s finest theatre from 1872 to 1885.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5397, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Parrish building, Front and Washington, Portland

Photograph showing two trucks parked outside the three-story Parrish building at Front and Washington (now Southwest Washington Street) in Portland. On the ground floor are signs for the Western Fruit & Produce Company and the Tri-State Produce Company. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Southwest corner Front & Washington streets. Site of the first post office [in Portland].” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5418, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Building at First and Alder, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of a three-story building at the corner of 1st and Alder streets (now Southwest 1st Avenue and Southwest Alder Street) in Portland. The building has a mansard roof and arched windows on the upper stories. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Once occupied by Emil Weber’s gambling hall / Now used as P E P Co’s [Portland Electric Power Company’s] interurban station.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5470, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Bank of British Columbia building, Front and Ankeny, Portland

Photograph showing the exterior of the Bank of British Columbia building at Front and Ankeny streets in downtown Portland. The building is three stories and has arched windows. Wooden barriers block off the front of the building, and a crane is parked at left. A cropped version of this photograph was part of a two-page spread in the Oregon Journal’s Sunday magazine on February 26, 1928. The spread, on Pages 4 and 5, was devoted to a story by Wallace S. Wharton about the history of the Portland waterfront and the buildings on First and Front streets. Wharton reflected on the changes that would occur as a result of the construction, then in progress, of Portland’s west-side harbor wall and redevelopment of the waterfront. He noted that many of the “stately old buildings along First and Front streets face destruction, or remodeling to such an extent that the reminiscent charm of their present environment will be lost.” Accompanying the story were 15 photos, primarily of buildings in the area. Across the top of the spread was the headline “IN THE PATH OF CIVIC PROGRESS — STRUCTURES OF ANOTHER DAY.” Below the headline on Page 4 was the subheading “Splendid Bits of Old Architecture Once Called Equal of Finest in Gotham of the Same Period.” Below the headline on Page 5 was the subheading “Waterfront Development Gives New Significance to Portland’s Old-Time Business Center.” This photograph had the following caption: “Bank of British Columbia bldg Front & Ankeny, Portland’s second bank.” See related image Nos. 371N5379, 371N5380, 371N5384, 371N5385, 371N5397, 371N5418, and 371N5857, which were published on the same spread.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view of Vista House and Crown Point Viaduct

Aerial photograph showing Vista House and the surrounding Crown Point Viaduct in the Columbia River Gorge. The view is toward the east. The lower half of the view is obstructed by the wing of the airplane from which the photograph was taken. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 10 that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Looping the Loop by Air,” that recounted an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway and described the views from the air. The photographs had the following caption: “Glimpses of familiar scenery snapped by Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, in ‘doing’ the Mont [sic] Hood Loop the air way.” This photograph had the following additional information: “Crown Point as it looks to the sky rider.” See image Nos. 371N5698, 371N5703, 371N5704, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721, which were published on the same page as this photograph. Also see image Nos. 371N5699, 371N5700, 371N5701, and 371N5702, which were taken during the same trip. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view, east face of Mount Hood

Aerial photograph showing the east face of Mount Hood. The wing of the airplane from which the photograph was taken is visible at lower left. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 10 that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Looping the Loop by Air,” that recounted an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway and described the views from the air. The photographs had the following caption: “Glimpses of familiar scenery snapped by Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, in ‘doing’ the Mont [sic] Hood Loop the air way.” This photograph had the following additional information: “Getting chummy with Mont [sic] Hood.” See image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5703, 371N5704, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721, which were published on the same page as this photograph. Also see image Nos. 371N5699, 371N5700, 371N5701, and 371N5702, which were taken during the same trip. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view, south and east faces of Mount Hood

Aerial photograph showing the south and east faces of Mount Hood. Part of the airplane from which the photograph was taken is visible on the right. This photograph was taken in 1932 during an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway. A story and 10 related photos from the trip were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The story was headlined “Looping the Loop by Air.” See related image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5698, 371N5700, 371N5701, 371N5702, 371N5703, 371N5704, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view, south face of Mount Hood

Aerial photograph, looking northwest, showing the south face of Mount Hood. The wings and struts of the plane from which the photograph was taken are visible at left. This photograph was taken in 1932 during an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway. A story and 10 related photos from the trip were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The story was headlined “Looping the Loop by Air.” See related image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5698, 371N5699, 371N5701, 371N5702, 371N5703, 371N5704, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view, southeast face of Mount Hood

Aerial photograph, looking northwest, showing the southeast face of Mount Hood. This photograph was taken in 1932 during an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway. A story and 10 related photos from the trip were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The story was headlined “Looping the Loop by Air.” See related image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5698, 371N5699, 371N5700, 371N5702, 371N5703, 371N5704, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Obstructed aerial view of Mount Hood

Aerial photograph of Mount Hood, predominantly obstructed by a strut of the airplane from which the photograph was taken. This photograph was taken in 1932 during an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway. A story and 10 related photos from the trip were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The story was headlined “Looping the Loop by Air.” See related image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5698, 371N5699, 371N5700, 371N5701, 371N5703, 371N5704, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view, Mount Hood Loop Highway and Government Camp, Oregon

Aerial photograph showing the Mount Hood Loop Highway and the Government Camp area southeast of Mount Hood. The landscape is mostly snow-covered. Government Camp is at center. At lower right is part of the wing of the plane from which the photograph was taken. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 10 that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Looping the Loop by Air,” that recounted an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway and described the views from the air. The photographs had the following caption: “Glimpses of familiar scenery snapped by Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, in ‘doing’ the Mont [sic] Hood Loop the air way.” This photograph had the following additional information: “Government Camp in a white landscape.” See image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5698, 371N5704, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721, which were published on the same page as this photograph. Also see image Nos. 371N5699, 371N5700, 371N5701, and 371N5702, which were taken during the same trip.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view of Cascade Locks, Oregon; Columbia River; and Bridge of the Gods

Aerial photograph, looking roughly southwest, showing the Columbia River and the Bridge of the Gods. At upper left is the town of Cascade Locks, Oregon. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 10 that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Looping the Loop by Air,” that recounted an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway and described the views from the air. The photographs had the following caption: “Glimpses of familiar scenery snapped by Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, in ‘doing’ the Mont [sic] Hood Loop the air way.” This photograph had the following additional information: “Cascade Locks and the Bridge of the Gods.” See image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5698, 371N5703, 371N5716, 371N5717, and 371N5721, which were published on the same page as this photograph. Also see image Nos. 371N5699, 371N5700, 371N5701, and 371N5702, which were taken during the same trip. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Aerial view of Hood River, Oregon, and Columbia River Gorge

Aerial photograph, looking east, showing the town of Hood River, Oregon, at center right; the Columbia River; and the hills of the Columbia River Gorge. A cropped version of this photograph was one of 10 that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal Sunday magazine on June 5, 1932. The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Looping the Loop by Air,” that recounted an airplane trip following the route of the Mount Hood Loop Highway and described the views from the air. The photographs had the following caption: “Glimpses of familiar scenery snapped by Roy Norr, Journal staff photographer, in ‘doing’ the Mont [sic] Hood Loop the air way.” This photograph had the following additional information: “Looking east up the Columbia Gorge airway.” See image Nos. 371N5679, 371N5698, 371N5703, 371N5704, 371N5717, and 371N5721, which were published on the same page as this photograph. Also see image Nos. 371N5699, 371N5700, 371N5701, and 371N5702, which were taken during the same trip. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

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