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Ted Hallock audio recordings
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Ted Hallock audio recordings

  • SR 24523
  • Collection
  • 1966 - 1993

This collection of audio recordings consists predominantly of political advertising work created or managed by Ted Hallock for his public relations agency. Most of the materials are open-reel tapes and date from the late 1960s to the mid-1980s. All but two recordings in the collection are unprocessed.

The processed recordings consist of interviews conducted in 1968 and circa 1975. The 1968 interviews were conducted by an unidentified woman with staffers for U.S. Senator Wayne Morse's re-election campaign. Also on the reel tape with the staff interviews are variations of political ads, produced by Hallock's company, for the Morse campaign. The interview conducted circa 1975 was with Aaron Brown, who became the first black judge in Oregon in 1969 and later served as a judge on the Multnomah County District Court. The interview was conducted by an unidentified woman for Grassroot News Northwest.

Unprocessed recordings in the collection include political campaign materials for Oregon politicians such as Ted Kulongoski, Jim Weaver, Les AuCoin, Wayne Morse, Bob Straub, Mike Lindberg, Connie McCready, John Kitzhaber, and Bob Duncan. The recordings also include advertisements on political topics including sales taxes, ballot measures regarding zoo funding, and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. There are also business advertisements, including ads for Douglas Community Hospital, Bidwell & Co., and John's Landing.

Hallock, Ted

Interviews with Wayne Morse campaign staff

These audio recordings consist of interviews with staffers of Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign for the U.S. Senate. The interviews were conducted by an unidentified woman. The interviewees include Ron Abell, Helen Johnson, and Phillip George. In these interviews, the staffers discuss Morse's accomplishments and the reasons why they believe he should be re-elected, including his senior position in the Senate, his stance on war and social issues, and his political acumen. They talk about Morse's plans to pursue legislation on health care, jobs, and poverty.

The recordings also include variations of political ads for Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign, produced by Oregon legislator Ted Hallock's advertising and public relations company.

Abell, Ron, 1932-

Interview with Aaron Brown

This interview with Aaron Brown was conducted by an unidentified woman around 1975 for Grassroot News Northwest. In the interview, Brown discusses his early college education and career as a teacher and railroad worker. He then discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, and attending Northwestern College of Law while working as a caseworker for the Oregon Welfare Department. He talks about being appointed as a judge to the Portland Municipal Court in 1969 and to the U.S. District Court of Oregon in 1971, as well as his re-election campaign in 1972. Brown talks about his experience as a black man in the legal profession, including his relationship with the press. He goes on to speak about the black experience in America and how it related to his decision to become a lawyer. He describes his belief in the judicial system, his reasoning behind some his judgements, and his thoughts on why black people are a disproportionate part of the number of people in prison. He closes the interview by discussing his views on drug use among young black people of the 1970s.

Brown, Aaron, Jr., 1926-2016

Interviews with Wayne Morse campaign staff [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. These audio recordings consist of interviews with staffers of Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign for the U.S. Senate. The interviews were conducted by an unidentified woman. The interviewees include Ron Abell, Helen Johnson, and Phillip George. In these interviews, the staffers discuss Morse's accomplishments and the reasons why they believe he should be re-elected, including his senior position in the Senate, his stance on war and social issues, and his political acumen. They talk about Morse's plans to pursue legislation on health care, jobs, and poverty. The recordings also include variations of political ads for Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign, produced by Oregon legislator Ted Hallock's advertising and public relations company.

George, Phillip

Interviews with Wayne Morse campaign staff [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. These audio recordings consist of interviews with staffers of Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign for the U.S. Senate. The interviews were conducted by an unidentified woman. The interviewees include Ron Abell, Helen Johnson, and Phillip George. In these interviews, the staffers discuss Morse's accomplishments and the reasons why they believe he should be re-elected, including his senior position in the Senate, his stance on war and social issues, and his political acumen. They talk about Morse's plans to pursue legislation on health care, jobs, and poverty. The recordings also include variations of political ads for Wayne Morse's 1968 re-election campaign, produced by Oregon legislator Ted Hallock's advertising and public relations company.

George, Phillip

Interview with Aaron Brown [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This interview with Aaron Brown was conducted by an unidentified woman around 1975 for Grassroot News Northwest. In the interview, Brown discusses his early college education and career as a teacher and railroad worker. He then discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, and attending Northwestern College of Law while working as a caseworker for the Oregon Welfare Department. He talks about being appointed as a judge to the Portland Municipal Court in 1969 and to the U.S. District Court of Oregon in 1971, as well as his re-election campaign in 1972. Brown talks about his experience as a black man in the legal profession, including his relationship with the press. He goes on to speak about the black experience in America and how it related to his decision to become a lawyer. He describes his belief in the judicial system, his reasoning behind some his judgements, and his thoughts on why black people are a disproportionate part of the number of people in prison. He closes the interview by discussing his views on drug use among young black people of the 1970s.

Brown, Aaron, Jr., 1926-2016

Interview with Aaron Brown [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This interview with Aaron Brown was conducted by an unidentified woman around 1975 for Grassroot News Northwest. In the interview, Brown discusses his early college education and career as a teacher and railroad worker. He then discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, and attending Northwestern College of Law while working as a caseworker for the Oregon Welfare Department. He talks about being appointed as a judge to the Portland Municipal Court in 1969 and to the U.S. District Court of Oregon in 1971, as well as his re-election campaign in 1972. Brown talks about his experience as a black man in the legal profession, including his relationship with the press. He goes on to speak about the black experience in America and how it related to his decision to become a lawyer. He describes his belief in the judicial system, his reasoning behind some his judgements, and his thoughts on why black people are a disproportionate part of the number of people in prison. He closes the interview by discussing his views on drug use among young black people of the 1970s.

Brown, Aaron, Jr., 1926-2016