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Oral history interview with Bob Christ

This oral history interview with Bob Christ was conducted by Jack G. Collins on September 28, 1990, with introductory comments by William F. White. White introduces the recording with the title "The Mover for the Shakers." In the interview, Christ briefly describes his early life in Portland, Oregon; his education; and his early career as a lawyer. He then discusses how he began his career as a law clerk at the U.S. District Court of Oregon in Portland, including his initial conversation with George Juba; assembling his staff; and the duties of the job. Christ talks about the procedures of the District Court and about judges he worked with, particularly Gus Solomon. He also talks about the transition to the digital age and other changes to the court. He closes the interview with an anecdote about finding what he thought was a bomb in the court bathroom, and the story of the impeachment of Judge Harry Claiborne of Nevada.

Christ, Bob (Robert Marvin), 1927-2019

Oral history interview with William V. Deatherage

This oral history interview with William V. Deatherage was conducted by Donald W. Brodie in Deatherage's office in Medford, Oregon, on February 24, 2003. In this interview, Deatherage discusses his service in the U.S. Navy from 1945 to 1948, particularly regarding the USS New Jersey. He then talks about his law professors at the University of Oregon. He discusses deciding to practice law with Otto Frohnmayer in Medford and gives a brief history of the law firm that was later known as Frohnmayer, Deatherage, Jamieson, Moore, Armosino and McGovern. He discusses some of the cases he tried over his career, including a first-degree murder case; judges he argued before; and his campaign for the Medford School Board. He also talks about his involvement in the Oregon State Bar and other legal organizations. He discusses the changes in the legal profession over the 20th century, including the increase in arbitration in lieu of trial. He also talks about government funding problems at the time of the interview and their effect on Medford. Deatherage and Brodie reminisce about the law school at the University of Oregon. Deatherage closes the interview by discussing his love of golf and gardening.

Deatherage, William V. (William Vernon), 1927-2018

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson

This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS. She also discusses her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns.

Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney's office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak's successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney's office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney's office, particularly Turner's emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.

Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison's biography, "Standing Tall." She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with George D. Rives

This oral history interview with George D. Rives was conducted by William R. Long at Rives' home in Portland, Oregon, from October 7 to November 5, 2005. In this interview, Rives discusses his family background and early life in rural Kentucky, including his early education and life on a farm. He then talks about his experiences at Kentucky Wesleyan College and at Yale, including his part-time jobs; the culture shock he experienced when arriving in New Haven, Connecticut; and some of his professors. He speaks at length about practicing transportation law at Turney, Rives, and Turney in Washington, D.C., in the wake of the 1935 Motor Carrier Act. He describes his service as an officer in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II. He then speaks at length about practicing transportation law at the Brobeck Firm in San Francisco, California, as well as representing manufacturing companies fighting utility rate increases. He then talks about working with Pacific Power and Light in the late 1950s, and how it led to his relocation to Portland, Oregon, to join the firm that would later be known as Stoel Rives. He discusses building the Stoel Rives firm and continuing to work with Pacific Power and Light. He also describes the firm's 1979 merger with the Davies Biggs law firm. He closes the interview by discussing his activities since his retirement in 1984, including a return to farm life and doing pro bono legal work.

Rives, George D. (George Douglas), 1915-2014

Oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde

This oral history interview with G. Bernhard Fedde was conducted by Eliza E. Canty-Jones in Beaverton, Oregon, on September 16, 2006. At the time of the interview, Canty-Jones' name was Eliza Elkins Jones. Fedde's wife, Johanna Borrevik, was also present during the interview and often contributed to Canty-Jones' questioning. Tape 1, Side 1 of the recording is an introduction to the interview, which begins on Tape 1, Side 2.

In the interview, Fedde discusses his family background and early life in Brooklyn, New York, including his memories of the Depression. He describes studying history at Williams College in Massachusetts, including a year he studied abroad in Munich, Germany. He talks about his experience as a conscientious objector during World War II. He speaks at length about heading the American section of the Quaker relief efforts in Germany after the war. He also talks about the creation of the Marshall Plan. He then discusses practicing law in Oregon, defending conscientious objectors during the Vietnam War, and judges he argued before. He also talks about a few summers he spent studying in The Hague, Netherlands. He discusses his work with the Scandinavian community, teaching Scandinavian history at Portland State University, and meeting King Olav V of Norway in 1977. He also tells the story of meeting his wife, Johanna Borrevik. He closes the interview by sharing his thoughts about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.

Fedde, G. Bernhard (Gabriel Bernhard), 1909-2007

Oral history interviews with John P. Cooney

Judge Cooney begins this interview by discussing his family history and his early years in Missouri. He explains the organization of professional baseball in the late ‘40s and early ‘50s and fondly recalls his time with the New York Giants. While he talks about law school and raising a family while achieving a career, the majority of this four-and-a-half hour interview focuses on Judge Cooney’s time with the District Court.

He discusses the unique role of the magistrate judge in Oregon, as well as the distinctions of Southern Oregon. Cooney explains the operation of the federal system, discusses the District Court’s jurisdiction in issues involving federal lands, and clarifies the kinds of cases tried by magistrate judges. He also talks about the roles of his two experienced law clerks, describing their duties and abilities and crediting them with an important place in court operations. In addition, Judge Cooney discusses relations between magistrates and Article III judges, the relationships between various agencies, and being a judge in a small town.

The impact of technological advances in the court’s operation is evident as Judge Cooney describes maintaining judicial collegiality in Southern Oregon through television appearances at the judges’ Monday lunches, teleconferences, and regular phone calls. The focus of the interview is on the types of cases tried, the court’s operations, and Judge Cooney’s experiences within that operation, rather than on specific cases. He describes the remodeling of the courtroom in Medford and the complexity and wonder of computers and monitors that provide new ways to present visual evidence. The interview closes with Judge Cooney’s perspective on family life, his travels with Eleanor-whom he also credits for his success-and his future retirement.

Cooney, John P.

Oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer

This oral history interview with Jacob B. Tanzer was conducted by Peter C. Richter from October 5, 2005, to April 4, 2006. In this interview, Tanzer discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. He briefly talks about his college experiences at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and Reed College. He then talks about studying law at the University of Oregon, including his part-time jobs. He discusses practicing law in Portland and deciding to pursue a career as a public prosecutor instead. He talks about working for the U.S. Department of Justice in the organized crime division during the John F. Kennedy administration, particularly his work on the case of civil rights workers murdered in Mississippi in 1964. Tanzer discusses his reasons for leaving the U.S. Department of Justice that same year to return to Portland as a Multnomah County deputy district attorney. He talks about his fellow prosecutors, defense lawyers he argued against, and some of the judges he argued before. He discusses his appointment as Oregon's first solicitor general in 1969 and describes some of the cases he prosecuted. He also talks about serving as director of the Oregon Department of Human Services from its inception in 1971 until 1973. He describes the types of social welfare programs he administered, discusses fighting budget cuts, and talks about working with Governor Tom McCall. He also speaks at length about volunteering with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Mississippi for one month in 1967 and describes many of the cases he worked on. Tanzer discusses serving on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1973 to 1980, and on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1980 to 1982. He talks about some of the judges he served with, particularly Hans Linde, and some of the opinions he wrote. He closes the interview by discussing the relationship between the legislative and judicial branches of state government; changes in the judiciary; and his advice for aspiring lawyers.

Tanzer, Jacob B., 1935-2018

Oral history interview with Jacque Jurkins

This oral history interview with Jacque Jurkins was conducted by Mary Ellen Smith at the Multnomah Law Library in Portland, Oregon, from February 23, 2006, to April 13, 2007. In this interview, Jurkins discusses her early life and high school experience in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. She then talks about attending the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh and the discouragement she received from professors when she expressed her desire to become a lawyer. She speaks about studying law at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, including her experience as one of only a few women in the law school, her social life, and some of her professors. She also describes the events that led her to working in the university's law library. She talks about her decision to go to library school and pursue a career as a law librarian. She discusses studying law librarianship at the University of Washington, including her primary professor, Marian Gallagher; her fellow students; and working in the university's library. She then talks about working at the University of Washington law library, helping to establish the Pacific Rim Library, and her experience reorganizing the Colorado Supreme Court Library.

Jurkins discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, in 1964 to head the Multnomah Law Library. She talks about the disarray in which she found the library and her work reorganizing it. She describes providing organizational help for many other law libraries in Oregon. She discusses the expansion of the law library, the different buildings it has occupied, and her staff. She talks about the changes in information technology and how that has affected her library work, as well as the use of the library. She talks about the increased security at the library and courthouses as a result of shootings. She discusses some of the lawyers, judges, and politicians who patronized the library; setting up a library at the Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College; and her role in the foundation of the Oregon Council of Law Libraries. She discusses teaching classes on legal research at Portland Community College, as well as her involvement with the Multnomah County Bar Association and the American Association of Law Libraries. She closes the interview by talking about her hobbies.

Jurkins, Jacque (Jacquelyn), 1928-

Oral history interview with Betty Roberts

This oral history interview with Betty Roberts was conducted by Katherine Huff O'Neil at Roberts' home in Portland, Oregon, from October 24 to November 16, 2005. In addition to the audio recording of the interview, the collection includes 50 digital photographs depicting Roberts' childhood, family, and later judicial career and activities. The collection also includes an index to the photographs.

In the interview, Roberts discusses her family background and early life in Texas, including her father's disability and the financial strain her family suffered during the Depression. She also talks about her early education, including playing on a girls football team. She talks about attending Texas Wesleyan College; meeting Bill Rice and their subsequent marriage; and moving to Southern Oregon in 1946. She describes raising a family, and returning to college late in life to pursue a teaching career. She then talks about getting involved in Democratic politics while attending Portland State University; the difficulty of balancing school, work, politics, and family; and her 1962 marriage to Frank Roberts. She also discusses some of the discrimination she faced due to her age and gender. She talks about studying law at Northwestern College of Law, including her professors and fellow students.

Roberts discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968. She talks about her experience as one of the few women in the Legislature, some of the legislation she worked on, and passing the Oregon bar in 1967. She talks about meeting Keith Skelton in the Legislature and their subsequent marriage in 1968. She then talks about serving in the Oregon Senate from 1969 to 1977. She describes the lack of a women's restroom in the Senate and other forms of discrimination she faced. She speaks at length about some of the legislation she worked on, particularly bills focusing on abortion and allowing married women to choose their names. She talks about other women legislators and the formation of the women's caucus in 1973, as well as much of the legislation on women's rights they worked on. She also discusses her committee assignments, practicing law in Portland while serving in the Legislature, and the formation of the Oregon Court of Appeals in 1977.

Roberts discussing serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1982. She discusses her appointment; her fellow judges, particularly Herb Schwab; and the sexism she faced. She then discusses serving as a justice on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1982 to 1986. She talks about her appointment, her fellow justices, and her experience as the first woman on the court. She also talks about some of the cases she heard and precedents set by her opinions. She then talks about her reasons for retiring in 1986, as well as her work as a mediator. Roberts and O'Neil close the interview by discussing the formation of Oregon Women Lawyers and some of that organization's activities.

Roberts, Betty, 1923-2011

Oral history interview with James A. Redden

This oral history interview with James A. Redden was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Redden's chambers at the U.S. District Court in Portland, Oregon, on January 27, 2006. In this interview, Redden discusses cases during his time as Oregon attorney general and as a U.S. District Court judge, including some involving treaties with Native Americans and fishing rights on the Columbia River, as well as the effects of the dams on salmon runs and other fisheries. He also discusses the history and impact of the U.S. District Court Historical Society; the war on terror, particularly the Patriot Act; and drug-related cases.

Redden, James A.

Oral history interview with Donal D. Sullivan

This oral history interview with Donal D. Sullivan was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Sullivan's chambers at the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Portland, Oregon, on July 6, 2006. In the interview, Sullivan discusses his early career as a lawyer in Salem, and as assistant district attorney with Sid Lezak in the Multnomah County district attorney's office in Portland, then as a clerk for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He describes working with judges Gus Solomon and William East. Sullivan also talks about serving as a bankruptcy judge. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family.

Sullivan, Donal D. (Donal Dennis), 1931-2009

Oral history interview with Owen Panner

This interview with Owen Panner was conducted by Michael O'Rourke in Portland, Oregon, on December 19, 2005. In the interview, Panner discusses mandatory sentencing and the effect of politics on the judiciary. He also talks about his plan to move to the District Court in Medford, Oregon. In addition, he discusses the structure and procedures of the District Court; technology in the courts; his involvement with the U.S. District Court Historical Society; and life on his Medford ranch.

Panner, Owen Murphy, 1924-

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin

This interview with Alfred Goodwin was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Goodwin's home in Sisters, Oregon, on August 26, 2006. In the interview, Goodwin discusses some of the topics that often come before the U.S. District Court, including immigration, fishing rights, and environmental law. He also discusses national legislation regarding terrorism; proposals to split the Ninth Circuit; technology in the court; and the War on Drugs. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family background.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Alfred T. Goodwin [Video 01]

Session 1. This interview with Alfred Goodwin was conducted by Michael O'Rourke at Goodwin's home in Sisters, Oregon, on August 26, 2006. In the interview, Goodwin discusses some of the topics that often come before the U.S. District Court, including immigration, fishing rights, and environmental law. He also discusses national legislation regarding terrorism; proposals to split the Ninth Circuit; technology in the court; and the War on Drugs. He closes the interview by talking about his personal life and family background.

Goodwin, Alfred T. (Alfred Theodore), 1923-

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman

This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman's office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London in England; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Oral history interview with Lee Johnson

This oral history interview with Lee Johnson was conducted by Clark Hansen at Johnson's home, as well as his office, in Portland, Oregon, from April 20 to September 29, 1992. In this interview, Johnson discusses his family background and early life in Toledo, Oregon, during the Depression; he likens Toledo to a company town. He talks about moving to Portland at the age of 11, then attending prep school in New Jersey, and Princeton after that. He discusses how his education at Princeton changed his political outlook, and talks about volunteering for the Navy after the Korean War. He then talks about studying law at Stanford, including his interest in antitrust law, his involvement with the Law Review, and starting a family with his wife, Dorothy Marie Miller. He goes on to discuss his brief stint as a trial lawyer for the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., under both the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations, as well as practicing law in Portland. He briefly describes many of the judges before whom he argued cases. He talks about his involvement with the Trumpeters and the Republican Party.

Johnson discusses serving in the Oregon House of Representatives from 1965 to 1968, including campaigning, advocating for a sales tax, and his views on decriminalizing drugs. He also talks about some of the legislators he served with, including Monte Montgomery and Harry Boivin. He also speaks about Governor Mark Hatfield's administration; reapportionment; and the constitutionality of the Beach Bill. He then discusses serving as attorney general for Oregon from 1969 to 1975, particularly his campaigns. He also discusses some of the cases he prosecuted, his staff, and recruiting lawyers. He also speaks at length about the passage of the Bottle Bill. He discusses working in Governor Tom McCall's administration, as well as Governor Bob Straub's; his rivalry with Clay Myers; and working with George Van Hoomisen. He also talks about his work on cases regarding welfare reforms, particularly to help single mothers; antitrust law; regulation of fisheries; and crime prevention. He speaks often about the working relationship the district attorney's office had with the Oregon Legislature. He also describes his DUI arrest and the resulting trial; the gun control debate; the prison system and capital punishment; and whistleblower protections.

Johnson discusses his partial term as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1978, including his campaigns, the role of the judiciary, and working with juries. He also discusses judges he worked with, including Jacob Tanzer, Jason Lee, Hans Linde and Herb Schwabe. He talks about judicial decisions, including on abortion; procedures of the court; continuing education; the relationship between courts of different levels; and his views on the role of judges. He speaks at length about his time working for the administration of Governor Vic Atiyeh, as well as changes in the Legislature. He then talks about serving on the Multnomah County Circuit Court of Appeals from 1983 up to the time of the interview in 1992, including cases he worked on, his colleagues, and staff. He talks about how legislation has affected the job of judges, including the war on drugs, liability laws, and sentencing guidelines. He closes the interview with a discussion of the members of the Oregon delegation to Congress.

Johnson, Lee (Robertson Lee), 1930-2009

Oral history interviews with Windsor Dean Calkins

Includes discussions of: family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon; education at University of Oregon and Willamette University Law School, Clark Honors College; portraits of Windsor Calkins (father) and Steve Deutsch; lobbying and drafting bills at the state legislature, including probate code; law practice in personal injury defense, medical malpractice, for public utilities, Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) in particular, and for Sacred Heart Hospital, Eugene. Also includes discussions of court cases, including: Marilyn Durham v Donald Slocum M.D. before U.S. Judge Belloni; Norma Fay Kesey v State of Oregon et al., before Judge William Beckett; Dr. Carl Yeager v Sacred Heart Hospital, before Judge Hogan. Other topics include: professional organizations, including Eugene Inns of Court; U.S. Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference; family life and interest in music.

Calkins, Windsor Dean

Oral history interview with Douglas R. Spencer

This oral history interview with Douglas R. Spencer was conducted by Craig J. Capon in Eugene, Oregon, from February 27 to June 20, 2008. In this interview, Spencer discusses his children and grandchildren, as well as his family background and early life in Eugene. He talks about going to the Lane County courthouse to watch trials for fun during high school. He then talks about attending Harvard University for several years before his naval reserve unit was activated in 1944. He describes his naval service in the Pacific Theater during World War II, including an experience when his ship was hit by a kamikaze. He talks about returning to finish his degree and study law at Harvard in 1946, and describes some of his classes and his social life. He then talks about returning to Eugene to prepare for the Oregon bar exam, meeting Amy Lou Ware, and their subsequent marriage.

Spencer discusses working as an assistant Lane County district attorney from 1949 to 1951. He talks about some of the cases he prosecuted, some of the judges he argued before, and lawyers he worked with. He then talks about practicing law in Cottage Grove for six months. He discusses teaching at the University of Oregon as an adjunct professor, then joining the Eugene law firm Bailey & Hoffman in 1953. He describes his daily life as a law associate, as well as his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes events in the Lane County bar and Circuit Court that led up to his appointment to the court in 1967, particularly regarding Judge Frank Reid. He discusses serving as a judge on the Lane County Circuit Court from 1967 to 1989. He describes his daily activities as a judge and his staff. He also talks about changes in the court over the years, particularly societal changes and how they affected the judicial system. He describes some of the more complicated cases he heard, particularly those involving the death penalty. He discusses his reasons for retiring in 1989, as well as his retirement activities. He closes the interview by talking about the differences between the state and federal judiciary.

Spencer, Douglas R., 1923-2013

Oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson

This oral history interview with Edwin J. Peterson was conducted by Jeffrey C. Dobbins in Salem, Oregon, from August 21 to December 11, 2007. Throughout the interview, Peterson refers to photographs and letters. Copies of some, but not all, of these items are included in the related U.S. District Court of Oregon Historical Society collection, Coll 560.

In this interview, Peterson discusses his family background in Gilmanton, Wisconsin, including the local creamery managed by his father; his childhood activities; and his early education. He also talks about his memories of rural life during World War II. He discusses having asthma and moving to Oregon in 1944 in an effort to improve his health, as well as his high school experience in Eugene. He talks about studying music at the University of Oregon, including his social life, his summer activities, and his involvement with the Young Republicans. He describes his service as a personnel officer in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, particularly his experience in administration. He then discusses attending the University of Oregon law school, including the dean, Orlando Hollis; his social life; and his summer jobs. He talks about relocating to Portland to practice law at Tooze, Kerr, Peterson, Marshall & Shenker. He speaks at length about the practice of law, as well as some of the cases he tried, some of his fellow lawyers, and judges he argued before. He particularly focuses on trial preparation and procedures. He also talks about his involvement with the Oregon State Bar, and his friendship with Clay Myers.

Peterson discusses serving on the Oregon Supreme Court from 1979 to 1993. He talks about his appointment by Governor Vic Atiyeh. He describes his fellow judges on the Supreme Court and the Oregon Court of Appeals. He also shows Dobbins his collection of photographs and speaks about them at length. He discusses the procedures of the Supreme Court, some of the cases he heard, and his re-election in 1980. He talks about serving as chief justice from 1983 to 1991, including implementing an integrated court system, the court's budget, and the court's staff. He reads entries from his journals detailing this part of his career. He also discusses the changes in technology, rules of professionalism, and diversity training. He closes the interview by talking about his activities since retiring in 1993, including teaching at the Willamette University law school and working as a mediator.

Peterson, Edwin J. (Edwin Junior), 1930-

Oral history interview with Diarmuid O'Scannlain

O'Scannlain discusses his family background and Irish heritage, his childhood in New York City, his education at St. John's Prep and Harvard, his involvement with the National Young Republicans and Trumpeters, his work as a lawyer in Portland, Oregon with the Dave Briggs firm (aka Stoel Rices) and Ragen, Roberts & O'Scannlain, his involvement in Republican politics and the Reagan administration, nuclear power, his appointment to the 9th Circuit Court, and some of the cases he oversaw while on that court.

O'Scannlain, Diarmuid F.

Oral history interview with Caroline P. Stoel

This oral history interview with Caroline P. Stoel was conducted by Adair Law from October 30 to December 5, 2006. Along with the interview recordings, the collection includes an incomplete transcript.

In this interview, Stoel discusses her family background and early life in Lexington, North Carolina, including her early education and childhood friends. She talks about attending Duke University, including her social life. She then talks about her experience as one the few women attending the Duke University Law School. She also discusses meeting Thomas B. Stoel and their subsequent marriage. She describes the sexism she faced when trying to begin her legal career in Portland, Oregon. She talks about working and raising young children while Thomas Stoel was serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. She discusses her involvement in her children's education in the Riverdale School District; her acquaintanceship with Richard Nixon; and her decision to return to college. She closes the interview by talking about her children, their careers, and their families.

Stoel, Caroline P.

Oral history interview with Jerry C. Harris

This oral history interview with Jerry C. Harris was conducted by Mary Ann DeLap on May 17, 2006. In this interview, Harris discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, from Colorado to meet his future wife, Zola M. Barnes. He talks about working as a court reporter for the Multnomah County courts and his experience as the only black court reporter for the county. He discusses moving to the federal court system and working for U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon. He also talks about working for other judges on the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He discusses the discrimination he's faced, his retirement activities, and some of the lawyers he worked with. He describes the process of court reporting, as well as how technology has changed the profession.

Harris, Jerry C. (Jerry Charles), 1936-2011

Oral history interview with Neva Elliott

This oral history interview with Neva Elliott was conducted by S. Diane Rynerson from April 10 to July 10, 1992. In this interview, Elliott discusses her family background and early life in Damascus, Oregon, including social life and her father's store; she also discusses attending Jefferson High School in Portland, Oregon. She then talks about attending Reed College, particularly her involvement in drama, then attending Northwestern College of Law in Portland while working as a secretary for Charles Spackman. She talks about working after graduation for U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Esta Snedeker as a court referee in Portland, then for lawyer Frank Seaver as a secretary. She discusses the challenges of finding a job as a lawyer as a woman. She then talks about starting her own law practice in Portland during World War II, when many men were serving in the military and the demographics of the city had changed. She also shares her memories of Judge Claude McCulloch. She talks about some of her cases as a lawyer, including being hired by a woman called as a witness against Chicago mobster Mickey Cohen, and the woman's subsequent murder. She then lists women lawyers she was acquainted with during her career. She briefly discusses serving as a pro tem judge on the Multnomah County District Court. She talks about the many clubs she's been involved with; her world travels; and her social life in Portland.

Elliott, Neva M. (Neva Marline), 1908-2001

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