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Oral history interviews with John Cooney, by Clark Hansen [Transcript]

Transcript. Judge Cooney begins this interview by discussing his family history and his early years in Missouri. He explains the organization of professional baseball in the late '40s and early '50s and fondly recalls his time with the New York Giants. While he talks about law school and raising a family while achieving a career, the majority of this four-and-a-half hour interview focuses on Judge Cooney's time with the District Court.

He discusses the unique role of the magistrate judge in Oregon, as well as the distinctions of Southern Oregon. Cooney explains the operation of the federal system, discusses the District Court's jurisdiction in issues involving federal lands, and clarifies the kinds of cases tried by magistrate judges. He also talks about the roles of his two experienced law clerks, describing their duties and abilities and crediting them with an important place in court operations. In addition, Judge Cooney discusses relations between magistrates and Article III judges, the relationships between various agencies, and being a judge in a small town.

The impact of technological advances in the court's operation is evident as Judge Cooney describes maintaining judicial collegiality in Southern Oregon through television appearances at the judges' Monday lunches, teleconferences, and regular phone calls. The focus of the interview is on the types of cases tried, the court's operations, and Judge Cooney's experiences within that operation, rather than on specific cases. He describes the remodeling of the courtroom in Medford and the complexity and wonder of computers and monitors that provide new ways to present visual evidence. The interview closes
with Judge Cooney's perspective on family life, his travels with Eleanor-whom he also credits for his success-and his future retirement.

Cooney, John P.

Oral history interviews with Windsor Dean Calkins, by Monica D. LaRosa [Transcript]

Transcript. Includes discussions of: family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon; education at University of Oregon and Willamette University Law School, Clark Honors College; portraits of Windsor Calkins (father) and Steve Deutsch; lobbying and drafting bills at the state legislature, including probate code; law practice in personal injury defense, medical malpractice, for public utilities, Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) in particular, and for Sacred Heart Hospital, Eugene. Also includes discussions of court cases, including: Marilyn Durham v Donald Slocum M.D. before U.S. Judge Belloni; Norma Fay Kesey v State of Oregon et al., before Judge William Beckett; Dr. Carl Yeager v Sacred Heart Hospital, before Judge Hogan. Other topics include: professional organizations, including Eugene Inns of Court; U.S. Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference; family life and interest in music.

Calkins, Windsor Dean

Oral history interview with Diarmuid O'Scannlain, by Michael O'Rourke [Transcript]

Transcript. O'Scannlain discusses his family background and Irish heritage, his childhood in New York City, his education at St. John's Prep and Harvard, his involvement with the National Young Republicans and Trumpeters, his work as a lawyer in Portland, Oregon with the Dave Briggs firm (aka Stoel Rices) and Ragen, Roberts & O'Scannlain, his involvement in Republican politics and the Reagan administration, nuclear power, his appointment to the 9th Circuit Court, and some of the cases he oversaw while on that court.

O'Scannlain, Diarmuid F.

Oral history interview with Frank A. Bauman [Transcript]

Transcript. This interview with Frank Anthony Bauman was conducted by Karen E. Saul at Bauman’s office at the Carriage House and in the Standard Plaza Building in Portland, Oregon, from November 5, 2005, to May 15, 2007. In the interview, while looking at family photographs, Bauman discusses his early life and childhood in Northeast Portland, including attending Grant High School and delivering newspapers. He then discusses attending Stanford University, including studying economics and his recollections of the lead-up to World War II and the attack on Pearl Harbor. Bauman also talks about his experiences in the Navy during World War II, including learning Japanese; deployment to the South Pacific, particularly Peleliu; treatment and interrogation of Japanese prisoners of war; and visiting Hiroshima after the war. He goes on to describe studying at Yale Law School and establishing himself as a lawyer in Portland. He also discusses his wife, Mildred Bauman, and her involvement in the Great Books Program; studying international law at the University of London; and working at various law firms in Portland, including Veatch, Bauman & Lovett, and Keane, Haessler, Bauman & Harper. He goes on to talk about cases he argued before the Oregon Supreme Court and District Court, including Zucker v. Mitchell and Ritchie v. Lamb. Bauman also discusses volunteering as a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi; his involvement with the World Affairs Council; and his involvement with the United Nations, particularly focusing on UNICEF, General Paul Cullen, and his service as U.N. senior officer to Australasia.

Bauman, Frank A. (Frank Anthony), 1921-

Oral history interview with Carol Hewitt [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Carol Hewitt was conducted by Susan Burton on August 24, 1990. The audio recording of this interview originally consisted of three audiocassettes. Tapes 1 and 2 are missing as of 2007, and the transcript reflects only the audio on Tape 3. In the portion of the interview on Tape 3, Hewitt discusses facing sexism as a woman lawyer and working at the law firm Lindsay Hart in Portland, Oregon. She then discusses her recent resignation from the Oregon Investment Council. She also discusses the growth of her law firm, Ater, Wynne, Hewitt, Dodson and Skerrit in Portland.

Hewitt, Carol, 1945-1993

Oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Hattie Bratzel Kremen was conducted by Susan C. Glen from April 22 to June 10, 1995. In this interview, Bratzel Kremen discusses her family background and early life in Mulino, Gresham, Silverton and Salem, Oregon, including facing anti-German sentiment during World War I, working on the family orchard, and her education. She discusses the limited career opportunities open to women, her decision to pursue work as a secretary in law offices, and working as a court reporter. She then talks about attending Northwestern College of Law (which later became a part of Lewis and Clark College) at age 37, including her professors, her women classmates, and working full time as a court reporter while studying. She also describes serving as a court reporter for Judge James T. Brown at the Nuremberg Trials in 1947, as well as her travels around post-war Europe. She talks about her first race for the office of Marion County district attorney in 1951. She discusses practicing law in Salem, including representing mothers in custody cases. She then discusses her service as Marion County district attorney from 1956 to 1964, including cases she prosecuted and the long hours she kept. She briefly talks about her marriage to Leonard Kremen, as well as his family background and early life. She then discusses her return to private practice in 1964 and focusing largely on probate law. She closes the interview by talking about her travels.

Kremen, Hattie Bratzel, 1908-1996

Oral history interview with George M. Joseph [Index]

Index. This oral history interview with George M. Joseph was conducted by Michael O’Rourke at Joseph’s home in Portland, Oregon, from August 7 to November 7, 2001, and on February 25, 2002. The portion of the interview recorded on February 25, 2002, was conducted at the Friendship Health Center in Portland, where Joseph was recovering from a broken leg. The first tape of this 27-tape interview features a brief overview of Joseph’s entire life and career. Beginning from Tape 2 of this interview, Joseph discusses his family background and early life in Boise, Idaho, including a store his mother ran in Boise, and the early death of his father from tuberculosis of the bone. He also describes a 1938 visit from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Boise; his awareness of the Depression; the Mormon community in Boise; and his family’s own Catholicism. He also speaks about contracting polio as a child and the lifelong physical issues it caused, as well as his memories of the internment of Japanese-Americans, and other events, during World War II. He then discusses his education, including attending Menlo School in Atherton, California, and Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) in Boise, Idaho; hitchhiking home; and his social life. He also discusses attending the University of San Francisco and Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including his social life and the development of his political views. He speaks at length about a recurrence of polio during his senior year at Reed and the extensive treatment and physical therapy he undertook as a result. He then talks about studying law at the University of Chicago, including his divorce from his first wife, Elizabeth Kalisher, and subsequent marriage to Elizabeth Starr, as well as coming to the realization that he did not want to be a lawyer. He describes Elizabeth Starr’s family background and early life, as well as their wedding and honeymoon. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, particularly acting as an alternate delegate for the 1956 Democratic National Convention.

Joseph discusses his return to Oregon in 1955 and his early legal career as a law clerk for Oregon Supreme Court Justice George Rossman. He briefly describes the judges on the Oregon Supreme Court at that time, as well as some of the cases Rossman presided over. He discusses teaching law at many different universities outside Oregon, including Ohio Northern University. He then describes working in the Multnomah County district attorney’s office under George Van Hoomisen, as well as his ambitions of becoming a judge. He talks about several cases he prosecuted and making a name for himself as a criminal appellate prosecutor; the focus of the district attorney’s office on vice cases, including an undercover operation that Joseph compromised; and civil rights cases he was involved with, particularly involving the people with mental illnesses. He talks about the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals and the subsequent increase in the workload of the district attorney’s office; Jacob B. Tanzer and other county-level judges; and his relationship with Multnomah County sheriff, and later Multnomah County commissioner, Don E. Clark. He then talks about his brief career as a lawyer in various private law firms in Portland, his involvement in the passage of the Multnomah County Home Rule Charter, and his ongoing attempts to become a judge. He speaks at length about Multnomah County politics and Don Clark’s accomplishments as county commissioner. He talks about serving as Multnomah County counsel, including working on public power and city-county consolidation. He also discusses briefly teaching at Lewis & Clark College.

Joseph next discusses serving as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals from 1977 to 1992. He describes the other judges on the court, including Robert Y. Thornton, Herbert M. Schwab, Betty Roberts, Jason D. Lee and William L. Richardson. He talks about writing opinions, the types of cases he heard, and his staff. He also describes the procedures and operating practices of the court. He shares his observations on the changes in the Oregon Supreme Court since the creation of the Oregon Court of Appeals. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1981 to 1992. He closes the interview by discussing his service on the Board of Bar Examiners and his involvement in the creation of a uniform bar exam, as well as reforms that have been made to the Oregon court system.

Joseph, George Manley, 1930-2003

Oral history interview with Robert C. Belloni [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Robert C. Belloni was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from September 19, 1988, to July 28, 1989. In this interview, Belloni discusses his family background and early life in Coos County, Oregon, including his education. He talks about studying pre-med at the University of Oregon and his service as a U.S. Army medical officer in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He describes landing in Japan just as it surrendered. He talks about returning to civilian life and deciding to go to law school, attending the University of Oregon, and his friendship with Ted Goodwin. He discusses his early law career in Coos County. He also talks about his early political career, holding the offices of chair of the Democratic Central Committee for Coos County and mayor of Myrtle Point. He also talks about his relationship with Wayne Morse. He discusses serving as a Circuit Court judge in Southern Oregon from 1957 to 1967, particularly presiding over juvenile cases. He then discusses serving on the U.S. District Court of Oregon from 1967 to the time of the interview, including the politics of his appointment. He discusses his fellow District Court judges, including Gus Solomon, John Kilkenney, and Otto Skopil. He also talks about the variety of cases that came before him, including on land fraud, asbestos, consumer protections, and several cases involving Native American rights. He discusses his law clerks, judicial process, and ethics. Belloni discusses serving as chief judge on the District Court from 1971 to 1976, and the duties and responsibilities of that position, including his work in establishing the magistrate system and the sentencing council. He closes the interview by discussing changes in the court systems over the 20th century, his experience as a senior judge, and his personal life.

Belloni, Robert C. (Robert Clinton), 1919-1999

Oral history interview with Thomas Cooney [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Thomas Cooney was conducted by Lisa A. Kaner from October 17 to November 2, 2000. In this interview, Cooney discusses his family background and early life in Portland, Oregon, including his interest in drama and golf, and his memories of World War II. He then discusses attending the University of Portland, including being a cheerleader. He also briefly discusses his service in the Air Force during the Korean War. He relates several unfortunate incidents involving a pogo stick. He describes studying law at Willamette University, including his social life. He then talks about raising a family and coaching his son’s basketball team. He describes getting started in law practice in Portland, Oregon, at MacGuire, Shields, Morrison, and Bailey, including several of the cases he tried. He then speaks at length about representing the Oregon Medical Association while a partner at Cooney & Crew and several of the malpractice suits he tried. He also relates several anecdotes about his life and being a lawyer.

Cooney, Thomas E., 1931-2015

Oral history interview with Edward Leavy [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Edward Leavy was conducted by Clark Hansen in Leavy’s chambers at the U.S. District Courthouse (known as the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse) in Portland, Oregon, from March 2 to April 13, 2004. The portion of the interview conducted on March 30, 2004 (Tapes 10 through 12) appears to have been simultaneously recorded on audiocassette and video. In the audio recording, the parties make reference to the video recording, which is not included in this collection.

In this interview, Leavy discusses his family background and early life on a hops farm in Butteville, Oregon, including his memories of the Depression and his education. He talks about attending the University of Portland and studying at Notre Dame Law School, including his reasons for attending Catholic schools. He also speaks about how his faith informs his morality and judicial decisions, particularly regarding the Fifth Amendment. He discusses serving as a deputy district attorney for Lane County and some of the cases he prosecuted. He reflects at length upon the byzantine workings of the justice system, its strengths and weaknesses, and a judge’s role within it.

Leavy discusses his election to the positions of Lane County District Court judge and Circuit Court judge, as well as the elections of other judges in Oregon. He talks about some of the cases he heard and some decisions of his that were reversed. He speaks at length about many of the judges he knew, including Ted Goodwin and Otto Skopil. He discusses the differences between state and federal courts. Leavy describes the magistrate system during the years he was a U.S. Magistrate for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He then speaks at length about mediating cases and reaching settlements. He discusses some controversial issues he’s had to rule on, including drug use, the death penalty, and abortion. He also speaks briefly about his family life.

Leavy discusses serving as a judge on the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, beginning with his appointment by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. He discusses some of the cases he heard, including on Rajneeshpuram. He describes the various duties of federal judges; the processes and procedures of the Court of Appeals; and how it differs from the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his experience as a senior judge on the Court of Appeals since 1997, including mediating for U.S. v. Wen Ho Lee. He then talks about serving on the Surveillance Court of Review from 2001 to 2008, including the history and duties of that court. He also talks about writing opinions, his staff and law clerks, and the workload on the Court of Appeals. He closes the interview by discussing his thoughts on the trend of civil penalties in lieu of criminal, and concerns about the right to privacy.

Leavy, Edward, 1929-

Oral history interview with Metta Beeman [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Metta Beeman was conducted by Trudy Allen on February 29, 1992. In this interview, Beeman discusses her family background and early life in Ashland, Oregon. She talks about studying law at Willamette University and Northwestern College of Law. She talks about working for the Veterans Administration and some of the cases she handled. She discusses some of the sexism she faced in law school and in the workplace; other women attorneys; and the women's associations she has been involved with, including the Queen's Bench. She then discusses going into private practice, dealing in probate law, with her husband, Harry Baughman, and talks about serving on the State Employment Board.

Beeman, Metta (Metta Delia Baughman), 1898-1995

Oral history interview with C. Edwin Luckey [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with C. Edwin Luckey was conducted by James N. Westwood in Beaverton, Oregon, on January 20, 1990. In this interview, Luckey discusses his family background and early life in Eugene, Oregon. He then talks about getting drafted while at the University of Oregon Law School and serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps in Europe during World War II immediately after graduating, including being in London, England, during the Blitz; how Eisenhower was viewed by the troops; and his marriage to Arlette Micheletti in France. He then discusses returning to Eugene, Oregon; practicing law; and serving as a district attorney of Lane County and later as the U.S. attorney for the District of Oregon, including prosecuting several murder cases and Elkins v. United States. He also discusses the politics of the Lane County district attorney's office, arguing before various judges, and his assistant district attorneys and staff. He closes the interview by speaking briefly about working as a bankruptcy judge and about his family life.

Luckey, C. Edwin (Clarence Edwin), 1919-1997

Oral history interview with Charles E. Wright [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Charles E. Wright was conducted by Karen J. Park in the offices of Bullivant, Houser, and Bailey in Portland, Oregon, from April 29 to July 1, 1993. In this interview, Wright discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his education, memories of World War I, social life, and working at First National Bank. He then discusses attending Yale, including his part-time jobs, his favorite subjects, and social life during Prohibition. He goes on to talk about attending Yale Law School. He describes some of his professors, including William O. Douglas, as well as some of his classmates. He talks about returning to Portland in 1933 and practicing law at Platt, Platt, Fales, Smith & Black, then later with the Bullivant firm in 1943. He describes the lawyers he worked with at the firms. He also talks about his marriage to Elisabeth Knowlton Strong and starting a family. He discusses working for the Securities and Exchange Commission in Seattle, Washington, from 1937 to 1943, including his frustration at the lenient sentences handed down for white-collar crimes. He also reflects on going to high school with Gus Solomon and Solomon’s later judicial career; passing the Oregon bar; and his involvement with the Portland Art Association. He speaks at length about practicing law at the Bullivant firm in Portland, including his clients, the firm’s growth, and his interest in probate law. He also briefly talks about his feelings about the greater number of women practicing law since the women’s movement of the 1960s and 1970s. He closes the interview by talking about his children and grandchildren, and his plans for the future.

Wright, Charles E. (Charles Edward Pares), 1906-1999

Oral history interview with Hugh Biggs [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Hugh Biggs was conducted by Clarence Wicks in the offices of Stoel, Rives, Boley, Jones & Grey in Portland, Oregon, from June 29 to July 2, 1988. In this interview, Biggs discusses his family background and early life in Ontario, Oregon, including the law career of his father, Dalton Biggs, as well as his father’s service as a Circuit Court judge, from 1910 to 1928. He discusses his owneducation, and life on a farm. He then talks about attending the University of Oregon, including studying law, social life, and serving as dean of men. He also talks about his wife, Elra Ware, and their children. He then briefly discusses practicing law in Ontario, serving as district attorney for Malheur County, and working as an assistant U.S. attorney in Portland, Oregon. He talks about going into private practice in Portland, particularly at Stoel, Rives, Boley, Jones & Grey, including the cases he worked on, clients he represented, and the history of the firm. He briefly describes the judges of the U.S. District Court of Oregon and his experiences arguing before them. He also talks about the various professional organizations he was involved in.

Biggs, Hugh L. (Hugh Lawry), 1904-1996

Oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Walter J. Cosgrave was conducted by Timothy J. Coleman on November 26, 1993. In this interview, Cosgrave discusses his family background and early life in Calaveras County, California, including his education, childhood games, and the experience of being the son of the county sheriff. He the talks about moving to the San Francisco Bay Area and attending high school. He briefly discusses coming to Oregon and getting interested in the law. This transcript contains additional biographical information provided by Cosgrave after the completion of the interview.

Cosgrave, Walter J. (Walter John), 1910-1999

Oral history interview with John F. Kilkenny [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with John F. Kilkenny was conducted by Rick Harmon in Portland, Oregon, from June 12 to October 3, 1984. The original audio of the recording is incomplete due to irretrievable damage to Tape 14, Side 2. Tape 17 is a re-enactment of that audio. The re-enactment was created by Rick Harmon and Terence O'Donnell after the damage to the original tape was discovered. It was based upon a transcript created before the damage occurred, which no longer exists. The accuracy of the re-enactment cannot be verified. In this interview, Kilkenny discusses his family background and early life on a sheep farm in Heppner, Oregon, and his education at Columbia Preparatory, a boarding school in Portland. He also briefly discusses his memories of World War I. He then talks about attending Notre Dame University in Indiana, including playing football under Knute Rockne; his social life; and preparing for the Oregon Bar by taking prep courses at Northwestern College of Law. He discusses his early law career in Pendleton and notable cases he worked on, including bankruptcy and Prohibition cases; his political views and Republican affiliation; and the effects of the Depression. He talks about serving as city attorney for Pendleton from 1930 to 1952. He talks briefly about how World War II affected his law practice, in the number and type of cases the firm handled. Also discussed is his involvement with the Oregon State Bar. Kilkenny discusses his 1959 appointment to the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He briefly describes judges he worked with, including Hall Lusk and Gus Solomon. He discusses cases involving admiralty law, the first amendment, labor unions, and criminal law. He then discusses his 1969 appointment to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. He discusses cases involving the draft, procedures of the court, and efforts to split the Ninth Circuit. He then discusses how his sentencing style has changed over time, new precedents set by recent courts, and his thoughts on the Vietnam War and the Watergate scandal. He discusses his involvement in the preservation of the Pioneer Courthouse in Portland. He closes the interview by talking about his recent activities and family life.

Kilkenny, John F.

Oral history interview with Kristine Olson [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Kristine Olson was conducted by Kenneth R. Perry from October 24 to December 7, 2005. In this interview, Olson discusses her family background and early life in Queens, New York, including her early education, her childhood pets, and her experience moving to a more affluent neighborhood at age 13. She also talks about her experience growing up in a neighborhood that was equal parts Jewish and Catholic. She discusses her early involvement in Democratic politics, particularly her activities during the civil rights movement. Olson talks about her experience at Wellesley College in Boston, Massachusetts, including her involvement in several student political organizations, such as the Students for a Democratic Society, Wellesley Against Racism, and ETHOS, as well as her social life and acquaintanceship with Hillary Rodham Clinton. She also briefly talks about attending Yale Law School. Olson then discusses living in the Cosey Beach Commune in the 1970s, meeting Jeff Rogers and their subsequent marriage, and beginning her law career as a clerk for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Zampano. She describes moving to Oregon in 1973 and clerking for U.S. District Court Judge James Burns.

Olson discusses working as an assistant U.S. attorney with Sid Lezak from 1974 to 1984. She talks about taking time off to have children and the flexibility the U.S. attorney’s office afforded her. She describes her poor relationship with Lezak’s successor, Charlie Turner, and how his reaction to her handling of the prosecution of Black Panther Kent Ford resulted in her departure from the U.S. attorney’s office. She then describes her appointment as U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon in 1994, including opposition from Charlie Turner, her interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, and her confirmation hearing. She describes the differences between how she and Turner ran the U.S. attorney’s office, particularly Turner’s emphasis on drug and pornography laws as opposed to her emphasis on civil rights and environmental laws. She talks about her admiration for Sid Lezak and Janet Reno, her brief experience working with Attorney General John Ashcroft, and her reasons for leaving office in 2001. She discusses working as legal counsel for Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer from 2001 to 2003.

Olson talks about her retirement activities, including her involvement with numerous civic organizations. She also talks about her friendship with Grand Ronde Tribal Council member Kathryn Harrison and about writing Harrison’s biography, “Standing Tall.” She also discusses her second marriage to Les Swanson. Olson closes the interview by describing some of her most influential professors, including Tom Emerson at Yale and Ingrid Staller at Wellesley.

Olson, Kristine

Oral history interview with Frederick H. Torp [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Frederick H. Torp was conducted by Brian Booth in the offices of Tonkon Torp LLC in Portland, Oregon, on December 28, 1998. In this interview, Torp discusses his family background and early life in New Jersey. He talks about attending Columbia College in New York City, including his family's financial difficulties during the Depression. He briefly discusses practicing law in New York before the advent of World War II. Torp then discusses his service in the Navy from 1942 to 1945, including acting as a lawyer in courts martial, and fighting in the Pacific Theater. He talks about joining the law firm of Hart Spencer, now known as Stoel Rives, in Portland, Oregon, in 1945, including the lawyers he worked with and his clients. He also talks about the 1954 termination of federal recognition of the Klamath Tribes and his involvement in some of the legal aspects of the termination. He discusses starting the law firm Tonkon Torp in 1974, including the lawyers he worked with. He talks about his children, their families, and their careers; his involvement with the Episcopal Church and other organizations; and his colleagues at the Hart Spencer firm. He closes the interview by talking about some of the judges on the U.S. District Court of Oregon, including Gus Solomon and James Alger Fee.

Torp, Frederick H., 1913-2003

Oral history interview with Gus J. Solomon [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Gus J. Solomon was conducted by Rick Harmon at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland, Oregon, from July 23 to October 18, 1984. In this interview, Solomon discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his memories of World War I, his Jewish upbringing, his father’s store, and his education. He then discusses attending Reed College, his interest in history, and his subsequent transfer to the University of Chicago. He discusses studying law at Columbia University, including his social life in New York, then transferring to Stanford University, including his developing political beliefs. He also discusses his family’s financial difficulties during this time period. He talks about the difficulty in finding a job in a law office during the Depression, and about some of the cases he worked on, particularly cases involving civil rights. He also talks about his involvement with the Democratic Party, the Oregon Commonwealth Foundation, and the American Civil Liberties Union. He describes his work toward establishing a legal aid program in Oregon, his work on public power, and his efforts getting jobs for young lawyers, particularly those from underrepresented groups. He describes being rejected for military service in World War II and cases he worked on related to internment of Japanese-Americans, particularly after the war.Solomon discusses serving as a judge for the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He talks about his election to the bench and the opposition he faced; the adjustment from lawyer to judge; and his relationship with his fellow judges. He describes in detail his techniques for speeding up the judicial process, with some case examples. He then discusses his activities as a senior judge, beginning in 1971, which he describes as being largely the same as when he was an active judge. He talks about hearing cases in other districts, particularly in Southern California; the McCarthy era; and cases with political implications, particularly cases regarding the draft. He talks about serving as chief judge from 1959 to 1971, and the changes he made to rules and procedures of the court. He describes some of the law clerks he’s had over his career, including Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. He speaks briefly about his early opposition to clubs with discriminatory policies. Solomon provides advice to lawyers on how to win cases, and discusses lawyers he has worked with. He talks about sentencing, judicial activism, and interpreting law.Solomon closes the interview by talking about his personal life and activities. He discusses the many organizations he has belonged to, including the Reed College Alumni Association and Amnesty International. He also talks about organizations he regularly donates to, including the Jewish Federation. He describes his family life and the activities of his children and grandchildren.

Solomon, Gus J. (Gus Jerome), 1906-1987

Oral history interview with Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. was conducted by Michael O’Rourke at the St. Regis Hotel in New York, New York, from May 19-20, 1999. In this interview, Kohlberg discusses his experiences as a law clerk for Judge Gus Solomon from 1952 to 1953, including some of the cases Solomon heard, and Solomon’s commitment to helping Jewish lawyers. He also briefly describes many of the lawyers and judges he met while in Portland, Oregon. He then talks about returning to New York to practice law and his continued relationship with Gus Solomon and Libby Solomon. He speaks at length about purchasing Fred Meyer in 1981 through his investment firm, Kohlberg, Kravis, Roberts (KKR & Co.), including his interactions with Fred G. Meyer, Oran B. Robertson, and Gerry Pratt. He closes the interview by briefly discussing how KKR has continued to manage Fred Meyer since its purchase.

Kohlberg, Jerome, Jr., 1925-2015

Oral history interview with Jerry C. Harris [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Jerry C. Harris was conducted by Mary Ann DeLap on May 17, 2006. In this interview, Harris discusses coming to Portland, Oregon, from Colorado to meet his future wife, Zola M. Barnes. He talks about working as a court reporter for the Multnomah County courts and his experience as the only black court reporter for the county. He discusses moving to the federal court system and working for U.S. District Court Judge Gus Solomon. He also talks about working for other judges on the U.S. District Court of Oregon. He discusses the discrimination he's faced, his retirement activities, and some of the lawyers he worked with. He describes the process of court reporting, as well as how technology has changed the profession.

Harris, Jerry C. (Jerry Charles), 1936-2011

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