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William L. Finley Papers, 1899-1946
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The black bear

Manuscript describing the process a mother black bear goes through when birthing and rearing her offspring.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Habits and history of the beaver

Manuscript in which the author corrects the perception that beavers are more valuable as pelts rather than members of ecological society. Extolls the idea that beavers should just be put back in the right place rather than killing them.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Destruction of fish runs in the Sandy River

Manuscript campaigning for the federal government to aid in controlling the fish resources of the Sandy River. The author states that the Fish Commission and Game Commission cannot keep up with the demand of maintaining the fish runs. Document provides a condensed history of the river.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Squaw or bear grass

Short manuscript that goes into detail about bear grass, specifically the different names it is known by as well as its uses.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Turkeys check grasshopper pests

Manuscript recounting when County Agent Henderson came up with the idea of using turkeys as a solution to the overpopulation of grasshoppers in the county. The insects were destroying vegetation at an alarming rate. Then when the turkeys are no longer needed, they are sold off as poultry.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Federal courts uphold migratory bird regulations

Manuscript recalling when hunters and sportsmen attempted to prove that migratory regulations signed by President Roosevelt were unconstitutional. Two cases are mentioned, one from Kentucky involving Judge Ford, the second in Illinois with Judge Major. Both upheld the regulations.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Golden eagle nearly wrecks car

Manuscript recalling a collision of Mr. Echidnas and an eagle. Fortunately the bird survived and was put into the care of Dr. L. E. Hibbard. The author goes on to point out that this eagle is protected by law but sadly has been exterminated in several parts of the Pacific Northwest.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Game record keeping for deer

Manuscript in which the Supervisor of the Ochoco Forest, Lester Moncrief, and storekeeper at Paulina, Lyle Miller, report the numbers of deer hunted. After considering the large number of bucks killed, rangers of the area asserted that the deer population was increasing. The author claims that the increase in population was direct proof that protection of the animals has been key to that success.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Californian interest in Oregon

Manuscript discussing the interest Californians were taking in Southern Oregon for recreation, especially in respects to angling in the Rogue, Umpqua, and Wilson rivers. The author points out that these are smaller streams and for the fishermen who depend on the rivers for their livelihood could be greatly affected by Californians' recreational fishing.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Varied thrush or Alaska robin

Document that contains two manuscripts. The first is on the subject of the Varied Thrush (also known as the Alaska or Oregon Robin). John Burroughs wrote a poem about the peculiar bird after his first sighting in Alaska. The second manuscript focuses on the black woodpecker. Captain Lewis of Lewis and Clark fame, authored the first known record of the bird. At Lewis's request, Alexander Wilson created a colored drawing of the bird.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Moulting season for birds

Manuscript commenting on the lack of bird songs and sightings in the month of August due to molting. As soon as the season is over, the birds actively seek out others in order to flock, which provides protection against predators.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Wholesale waterfowl destruction in the Klamath Country

Manuscript discusses how the waterfowl in Klamath country are now protected from hunters by game laws. The Bureau of Reclamation destroyed areas of sanctuary for waterfowl because the demand for land for agricultural use was so high. According to Dr. C. F. Marbut from the Department of Agriculture, the soil from the land in and around the bed of the Lower Klamath Lake could not support agricultural means successfully. Instead, the area became a refuge similar to Clear Lake.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Sportsmen kill the goose that lays the golden egg

Manuscript discussing the alarming state of the decline of local animal and fish populations. The author contends that it is a combination of exhausting the local population for sport and introducing foreign populations of animals and fish to satisfy the demand for game to hunt. The document proposes that there are two points in a plan of action in order to restore native populations. The first is to enforce the laws of protection for the animals and fish, and the second is to educate in order to support wildlife resources.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Best trout stream and trout surveys

Two manuscripts are featured in this document. The first discusses how the Deschutes River is an ideal place for trout, not only for sport but for the fish to inhabit. The river benefits from the lack of silt in the water and protection from dumping pollutants. Also due to a lack of a paved road, access is limited to the area. The second manuscript discusses the importance of conducting surveys that determine what makes a place suitable for a fish to inhabit. Factors such as what are the food sources and water temperature are to be considered. The writer makes the point that one cannot gauge from mere visual observation the amount of fish in any given stream. To truly determine the population, in depth surveys must be done.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Nothing a duck hunter likes better than ducks

This appears to be a rough draft of "Nothing a duck hunter likes better than ducks." Small differences include the additional sentences and above the title in faint pencil 'Consider the poor old duck hunter'.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

Renting houses for songs

Manuscript of "Renting houses for songs." The document explores the unintentional restructuring of habitats for birds. With additional people purchasing land that previously housed birds, the birds are finding themselves in close contact with human habitats. Additionally, other species not native to the land have been introduced and are taking housing from the native bird populations.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

The gull bread line

Manuscript that describes a conversation between the author and a young man who is a member of the Audubon Society. The author and man observe how many people do not take the time to feed the birds. The author later reflects that people such as naturalists and Audubon members do not need endless amounts of free time, they are just as busy and productive as other members of society. It is that they desire to enjoy their lives and take pleasure in taking time to experience life.

Finley, William L. (William Lovell), 1876-1953

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