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Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Captain John M. Stanley in plane after return to Pearson Field

Photograph of two aviators in a plane outside a hangar at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday, January 7, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, January 8, 1927, under the headline “Here’s Kelly — If Anyone Asks.” The photograph had the following caption: “After losing and finding themselves again while looking for Leslie Brownlee, lost on Mount Hood, Lieutenant Oakley Kelly and Captain John Stanley returned Friday to Vancouver barracks. They were greeted by Motorcycle Patrolmen Regan and Tauscher, who joined in the search for them. Kelly is shown in the front seat of the plane, Stanley behind.” According to an accompanying story, headlined “Kelly Tells of Harrowing Trip; Never Such Fog,” Stanley and Kelly had left on Wednesday, January 5, to conduct an aerial search of Mount Hood for Brownlee, but were caught in a storm and dense fog. They were forced to fly east and land in a field about five miles from Long Creek, in Grant County. According to the story, they spent the night in the field with the plane and walked to get help and fuel the next morning. On their return flight, they were delayed by another storm and spent the night of Thursday, January 6, in Pendleton before continuing to Vancouver on January 7. See related image No. 371N5908. Image note: The text “Kelly + Stanley” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington

Portrait of a smiling man, Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly, commander of the 321st Observation Squadron at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington. He is near a hangar at Pearson and is wearing a fur-trimmed coat and an aviator cap and goggles. The text “Kelly” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the right side of the image.

Franklin D. Roosevelt holds child during campaign visit to Seattle

Photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt, then governor of New York, holding a young boy in Seattle, Washington, on September 20, 1932, while campaigning for president. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 20 of the Oregon Journal on September 21, 1932, as part of a full page of photographs from Roosevelt’s trip through Oregon and Washington. The photographs were published under the headline “Great Crowds Welcome Governor Roosevelt to the Pacific Northwest.” This photograph had the following caption: “Making friends with a little patient at the Orthopedic hospital in Seattle during his visit there Tuesday.” A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 20 of the Oregon Journal on September 21, 1932, as part of a full page of photographs from Roosevelt’s trip through Oregon and Washington. See related image Nos. 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2179, 371N2180, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2187, 371N2188, 371N2189, 371N2191, 371N2196, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

Franklin D. Roosevelt waves from his car, possibly during campaign visit to Seattle

Photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt in an open-topped car with several unidentified men, waving his hat to crowds lining the street. This photograph may have been taken on September 20, 1932, in Seattle, Washington, while Roosevelt was campaigning for the presidency. See related image Nos. 371N2175, 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2180, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2187, 371N2188, 371N2189, 371N2191, 371N2196, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

Franklin D. Roosevelt riding in flower-draped car, possibly during campaign stop in Seattle

Photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt in an open-topped car covered with flowers. This photograph may have been taken in Seattle, Washington, on September 20, 1932, while Roosevelt was campaigning for the presidency. See related image Nos. 371N2175, 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2179, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2187, 371N2188, 371N2189, 371N2191, 371N2196, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

Franklin D. Roosevelt during campaign stop at Western Washington state fair

Photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt seated on top of his car at the Western Washington state fair in Puyallup on September 20, 1932. Roosevelt was in the Northwest to campaign for the presidency. See related image Nos. 371N2175, 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2179, 371N2180, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2188, 371N2189, 371N2191, 371N2196, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Chief Jobe Colwash, and crowd at Western Washington state fair

Photograph showing Franklin D. Roosevelt seated atop his car at the Western Washington state fair in Puyallup on September 20, 1932, while he was in the Northwest to campaign for the presidency. A crowd of people is gathered near the car. At right is Chief Jobe Colwash, also known as Jobe Charley, of the Yakama people. See related image Nos. 371N2175, 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2179, 371N2180, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2187, 371N2189, 371N2191, 371N2196, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

Franklin D. Roosevelt and Chief Jobe Colwash shaking hands at Western Washington state fair

Photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt sitting in an open-topped car and shaking hands with Chief Jobe Colwash, also known as Jobe Charley, of the Yakama people. The photograph was taken on September 20, 1932, at the Western Washington state fair in Puyallup, while Roosevelt was in the Northwest to campaign for the presidency. See related image Nos. 371N2175, 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2179, 371N2180, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2187, 371N2188, 371N2191, 371N2196, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Chief Jobe Colwash, and crowd at Western Washington state fair

Photograph showing Franklin D. Roosevelt seated atop his car at the Western Washington state fair in Puyallup on September 20, 1932, while he was in the Northwest to campaign for the presidency. A crowd of people is gathered near the car. At center right, in regalia, is Chief Jobe Colwash, also known as Jobe Charley, of the Yakama people. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 20 of the Oregon Journal on September 21, 1932, as part of a full page of photographs from Roosevelt’s trip through Oregon and Washington. The photographs were published under the headline “Great Crowds Welcome Governor Roosevelt to the Pacific Northwest.” This photograph had the following caption: “The governor speaking from his automobile at the Western Washington state fair at Puyallup Tuesday afternoon. (Photo by Ralph Vincent, Journal staff photographer).” See related image Nos. 371N2175, 371N2176, 371N2177, 371N2178, 371N2179, 371N2180, 371N2181, 371N2182, 371N2183, 371N2184, 371N2185, 371N2187, 371N2188, 371N2189, 371N2191, 371N2198, 371N2199, 371N2200, and 371N2201.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

E. E. Spafford in airplane, shaking hands with Mayor George L. Baker

Photograph showing E. E. Spafford sitting in an airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, and shaking hands with Portland Mayor George L. Baker, who is standing next to the plane. The photograph was taken on Monday, April 9, 1928, after Spafford, national commander of the American Legion, arrived to speak in Portland. An article and other photographs about Spafford's visit, including image No. 371N2400, were published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Monday, April 9, 1928. See related image Nos. 371N2398, 371N2399, and 371N2400. Image note: The name “Spafford” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

E. E. Spafford in airplane, shaking hands with Mayor George L. Baker

Photograph showing E. E. Spafford sitting in an airplane at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, and shaking hands with Portland Mayor George L. Baker, who is standing next to the plane. The photograph was taken on Monday, April 9, 1928, after Spafford, national commander of the American Legion, arrived to speak in Portland. An article and other photographs about Spafford’s visit, including image No. 371N2400, were published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Monday, April 9, 1928. See related image Nos. 371N2397, 371N2399, and 371N2400. Image note: The name “Spafford” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Mayor George L. Baker and Dr. Archie C. Van Cleve greeting E. E. Spafford

Photograph showing Portland Mayor George L. Baker (left) and Dr. Archie C. Van Cleve (right) standing next to an airplane and greeting E. E. Spafford, who is sitting in the plane’s rear seat. Spafford, national commander of the American Legion, and Van Cleve, commander of Portland Legion post No. 1, are shaking hands as Baker watches. The photograph was taken on Monday, April 9, 1928, at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, after Spafford arrived to speak in Portland. An article and other photographs about Spafford’s visit, including image No. 371N2400, were published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Monday, April 9, 1928. See related image Nos. 371N2397, 371N2398, and 371N2400. Image note: The name “Spafford” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

E. E. Spafford and unidentified man at Pearson Field

Photograph showing E. E. Spafford (center), national commander of the American Legion, at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Monday, April 9, 1928, after he arrived to speak in Portland. The man at right is unidentified. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Monday, April 9, under the headline “Legion Commander Air Fan.” The photographs accompanied an article with the headline “Head Of Legion Visits Portland.” See related image Nos. 371N2397, 371N2398, and 371N2399. Image note: The name “Spafford” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a Varney Air Lines mail plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. On December 1, 1929, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the crash, headlined “Mail Pilot Rams Span; Badly Hurt.” A similar photo, image No. 371N3109, was published on Page 2 that day. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the [Interstate] bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day.

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, December 1, 1929, under the headline “Fog Claims Another Plane Victim.” The photograph had the following caption: “Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane which spun to the ground at Vancouver Saturday afternoon after nicking the north tower of the Interstate bridge.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the crash. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day, December 1, 1929. Also see image No. 371N3106.

Wreckage of steamship Laurel near mouth of Columbia River

Aerial photograph of part of the steamship Laurel after it wrecked on a sandbar near the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the steamer, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15, 1929. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A photograph similar to this one was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, June 18, 1929, under the headline "All Hands Off But the Skipper -- And He's Still There." That photograph had the following caption: "In this remarkable air view of the wrecked hulk of the steamship Laurel lying in the breakers off North jetty beach the figure of Captain Louis Johnson shows near the rail as he waved goodbye to The Journal plane which circled over him Monday afternoon. The plane, piloted by Dick Rankin of the Rankin System, Inc., carried Ralph Vincent, Journal staff photographer, who took the picture, and Dick Rummel of The Journal staff." The photograph accompanied two articles about the Laurel shipwreck, one titled "Gale Balks Effort to Rescue Skipper; Seas Pound Laurel," and another titled "Journal Men Get Air View." Image note: The text "S. S. Laurel" is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Masthead of wrecked steamship Iowa

Photograph, taken Monday, January 13, 1936, of the top of the steamship Iowa’s mast after the ship wrecked on Peacock Spit, near the mouth of the Columbia River. The ship wrecked during a storm early on the morning of Sunday, January 12. All 34 people aboard the Iowa were killed. A similar photograph, 371N3179, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, January 14, 1936, under the headline “Waveswept Masthead of the Iowa, Bleak Marker of Grim Sea Disaster.” The photograph accompanied two stories: one about the wreck, headlined “Rain, Seas Stall Hunt for Bodies,” and another about the photographer’s experience, headlined “Journal Cameraman Finds Iowa Trip Exciting.”

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Masthead of wrecked steamship Iowa

Photograph, taken Monday, January 13, 1936, of the top of the steamship Iowa’s mast after the ship wrecked on Peacock Spit, near the mouth of the Columbia River. The ship wrecked during a storm early on the morning of Sunday, January 12. All 34 people aboard the Iowa were killed. A similar photograph, 371N3179, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, January 14, 1936, under the headline “Waveswept Masthead of the Iowa, Bleak Marker of Grim Sea Disaster.” The photograph accompanied two stories: one about the wreck, headlined “Rain, Seas Stall Hunt for Bodies,” and another about the photographer’s experience, headlined “Journal Cameraman Finds Iowa Trip Exciting.” Image note: Light leak on negative.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Masthead of wrecked steamship Iowa

Photograph, taken Monday, January 13, 1936, of the top of the steamship Iowa’s mast after the ship wrecked in a storm near the mouth of the Columbia River on Sunday, January 12. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, January 14, 1936, under the headline “Waveswept Masthead of the Iowa, Bleak Marker of Grim Sea Disaster.” The photograph had the following caption: “Closeup of visible remains of the sturdy States’ line steamer, pounded into the sands of Peacock Spit, taking lives of 34 men on board early Sunday morning. Photograph taken by Ralph Vincent, Journal cameraman, from the 38-foot lifeguard boat from Fort Canby coast guard station which braved gigantic swells Monday to search for bodies near the wreck.” The photograph accompanied two stories: one about the wreck, headlined “Rain, Seas Stall Hunt for Bodies,” and another about the photographer’s experience, headlined “Journal Cameraman Finds Iowa Trip Exciting.” Image note: Damaged negative.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Photograph of wrecked steamship Iowa

Photograph of a print of image No. 371N3179, showing the top of the steamship Iowa’s mast after the ship wrecked on Peacock Spit, near the mouth of the Columbia River. The ship wrecked during a storm early on the morning of Sunday, January 12, 1936. All 34 people aboard the ship were killed. The original photograph was taken by Oregon Journal photographer Ralph Vincent on January 13, 1936. A cropped version of it was published on Page 1 of the Journal on Tuesday, January 14, under the headline “Waveswept Masthead of the Iowa, Bleak Marker of Grim Sea Disaster.” The photograph accompanied two stories: one about the wreck, headlined “Rain, Seas Stall Hunt for Bodies,” and another about the photographer’s experience, headlined “Journal Cameraman Finds Iowa Trip Exciting.”

Senti family dog in field after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti’s fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Hatchet used by Tobias Senti in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the hatchet used by Tobias Senti to kill his wife and children. The hatchet is held up by an unidentified person; only the person’s hand is in the frame. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Hatchet with which Senti killed his wife and children.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Loyal Order of Moose? parade in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a parade in Vancouver, Washington. At right is a band in costume, playing instruments. The people in the parade may be members of the Loyal Order of Moose. Also see image Nos. 371N4894, 371N4896, 371N4897, 371N4898, 371N4899, 371N4900, 371N4901, 371N4902, 371N4903, 371N4904, and 371N4925. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Loyal Order of Moose members?

Group portrait of unidentified men, possibly members of the Loyal Order of Moose, posing in two rows on the street next to W. L. Runyan Jewelers in Vancouver, Washington. The men are wearing matching southern-style cowboy clothing. Also see image Nos. 371N4891, 371N4897, 371N4898, 371N4900, 371N4901, 371N4902, 371N4903, 371N4904, and 371N4925.

Loyal Order of Moose band?

Portrait of an unidentified band, possibly a Loyal Order of Moose band, posing with instruments on a street in Vancouver, Washington. The band members are in costume, and the trombonist standing in the front row is in blackface. The photograph may be related to a parade. Also see image Nos. 371N4891, 371N4898, and 371N4899.

Loyal Order of Moose? parade in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a parade in Vancouver, Washington. The men in front are wearing matching southern-style cowboy clothing. The people in the parade may be members of the Loyal Order of Moose. Also see image Nos. 371N4891, 371N4894, 371N4897, 371N4898, 371N4900, 371N4901, 371N4902, 371N4904, and 371N4925. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

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