Homicides

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Homicides

26 Collections results for Homicides

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Photograph of murder victim Mildred Hook

Photograph of a head and shoulders portrait of a young woman wearing a blouse or dress. The original photograph is tacked to a wall or bulletin board. The name “Mildred Hook” is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image. In November 1935, Mildred Hook was kidnapped by her ex-husband, Douglas Van Vlack, in Tacoma, Washington. Her body was later found near Twin Falls, Idaho. Van Vlack was convicted of her murder.

Frank La Belle, murder suspect, at Portland police headquarters

Photograph of murder suspect Frank La Belle of Jewel, Oregon, sitting at a table and holding a cigar. He is looking left at a person mostly outside the frame. The photograph was taken at Portland police headquarters on November 30, 1935, after La Belle’s arrest. A similar photograph, image No. 372A0331, and a story about La Belle were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on December 1, 1935. the story, headlined “Killer Confesses Shooting Woman,” reported: “Detectives searching the city for the slayer who left Mrs. Myrtle A. Service dying in the Belmont hotel, 230 N. W. 6th avenue, from a bullet in the neck Saturday, arrested a 68-year-old-man at 4;15 p.m. and held him under a first-degree murder charge.” The story further reported that Service had separated from her husband a month earlier, and that under police questioning, La Belle had admitted to the shooting, saying he and service “had made a suicide pact that went awry after he had shot the woman.” Image note: The name “Frank La Belle” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Frank La Belle, murder suspect, and unidentified man at Portland police headquarters

Photograph, taken November 30, 1935, showing murder suspect Frank La Belle (left) of Jewel, Oregon, and an unidentified man sitting at a table. The man on the right is holding a pencil and a piece of paper filled with handwriting. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, December 1, 1935, under the headline “Death Signs the Register.” The photograph had the following caption: “Frank La Belle, 68-year-old barber. La Belle was photographed at police headquarters as he told the sordid story of a ‘suicide pact’ that was only half fulfilled.” The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Killer Confesses Shooting Woman.” The story reported: “Detectives searching the city for the slayer who left Mrs. Myrtle A. Service dying in the Belmont hotel, 230 N. W. 6th avenue, from a bullet in the neck Saturday, arrested a 68-year-old-man at 4;15 p.m. and held him under a first-degree murder charge.” The story further reported that Service had separated from her husband a month earlier, and that under police questioning, La Belle had admitted to the shooting, saying he and Service “had made a suicide pact that went awry after he had shot the woman.” Image note: The name “Frank La Belle” is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image.

Joseph John Osbourne testifying during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish

Photograph showing Joseph John Osbourne sitting on the witness stand in Multnomah County Circuit Court as he testifies during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish, age 70, who was found dead in a pond at his Northeast Portland home on December 12, 1934. The photograph was taken on March 25, 1935. That day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about Osbourne’s testimony and a related photograph, image No. 372A0796, also showing Osbourne on the stand. On March 28, 1935, the Journal reported that the jury had convicted Osbourne of second-degree murder, which carried a mandatory life sentence. Image note: The text “Osborne [sic] Trial” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Joseph John Osbourne testifying during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish

Photograph showing Joseph John Osbourne sitting on the witness stand in Multnomah County Circuit Court as he testifies during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish, age 70, who was found dead in a pond at his Northeast Portland home on December 12, 1934. The photograph was taken on March 25, 1935. That day, a cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 18 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “On the Stand in His Own Defense.” The photograph had the following caption: “Joseph John Osbourne, on trail for his life in connection with the fishpond murder of Simon Mish, takes the stand as witness and leans forward to answer cross-examination of Deputy District Attorney Joe Price. The head of Circuit Judge Crawford is seen behind books on his desk in the foreground.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about Osbourne’s testimony. On March 28, 1935, the Journal reported that the jury had convicted Osbourne of second-degree murder, which carried a mandatory life sentence. See related image No. 372A0795. Image note: The text “Osborne [sic] Trial” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

William Edward Hickman in jail in Pendleton, Oregon

Full-length portrait of William Edward Hickman sitting in a jail cell in Pendleton, Oregon, probably on December 23 or December 24, 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and State Traffic Officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and was executed that October. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, December 24, 1927, under the headline “The Trapped ‘Fox.’ ” The photograph had the following caption: “William Edward Hickman speculates upon his fate within the narrow confines of his jail cell in Pendleton.” Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, and 371N3581.

Photo International

Senti family dog in field after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti’s fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Albert D. Glibert, killer of mill superintendent John W. Bevis

Head and shoulders portrait of mill worker and murder suspect A. D. Glibert. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on February 28, 1931, and again on March 1, 1931. On February 28, the photograph was published on the Journal’s front page under the headline “Grudge Leads to Murder.” The photograph had the following caption: “Albert D. Glibert, who today shot and killed John W. Bevis, superintendent of the Inman Poulsen mill, because he blamed Bevis for his discharge. Glibert then turned his weapon on Bevis’ assistant, George W. Martin, and inflicted serious injury.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Mill Boss Slain, Aide Badly Shot.” On March 1, the photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal with image No. 371N3218, depicting a note that Glibert wrote before the shooting. On that day, this photograph had the following caption: “Taken by a Journal staff cameraman a few minutes after Glibert was overpowered by fellow employees.” Later, on July 30, 1931, the Journal reported that Glibert had pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison. The Journal reported that the plea followed a trial on first-degree murder charges in which the jury was unable to agree on a verdict. Image note: The name “A. D. Gilbert [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the photograph. Image note: The photograph shows discoloration from deterioration of the negative.

William Edward Hickman and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane

Photograph showing William Edward Hickman (right) and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane (left, in background) in December 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928. He was executed in October 1928. A cropped version of this photograph was one of several, including image Nos. 371N3579 and 371N3581, that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927, under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime.” This photograph had the caption “Hickman and Police Chief Gurdane.” The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Also see image Nos. 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076. Image note: The text “Hiekman + Gurdane” (sic) is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Photograph of murder victim Agnes LeRoi

Photograph of a photograph. The original picture is a head and shoulders portrait of a woman facing left, looking toward the front, and wearing a dress and necklace. The name “Agnes Imlah,” the woman’s maiden name, is written at the top of the original picture. The name “Agnes LeRoi” is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image. LeRoi, who was originally from Oregon, was murdered in Phoenix, Arizona, in October 1931.

Peggy Norman, witness to murder of boxer Johnny Hansen

Head and shoulders portrait of a young woman, Peggy Norman, a witness to the murder of boxer Johnny Hansen at the LaVelle Hotel in Portland. Norman is facing front, looking toward the right, and wearing a hat and fur stole. The photograph was taken on March 2, 1932, the day of Hansen’s death. A front-page story and a related photograph, image No. 371N1892, were published in the Oregon Journal the same day. The story, headlined “Prizefight Star Shot And Killed,” reported that the suspect in Hansen’s death was another boxer, Jack Kentworth. The Journal reported: “According to the story told police, Kentworth called at the LaVelle hotel room in which were Hansen and Miss Norman, drew a gun, threatened to kill them both, and then fired the one shot into Hansen’s body.” The story also reported that Peggy Norman and Kentworth had shared a room at the hotel from September until two weeks before the day of Hansen’s murder, when they separated and she moved into a different room. Image note: The name “Peggy Norman” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Peggy Norman, witness to murder of boxer Johnny Hansen

Half-length portrait of a young woman, Peggy Norman, a witness to the murder of boxer Johnny Hansen at the LaVelle Hotel in Portland. Norman is sitting in a chair with her arms folded in her lap. She is facing right, looking toward the front, and wearing a hat and fur stole. The photograph was taken on March 2, 1932, the day of Hansen’s death. It was published on Page 17 of the Oregon Journal on the same day, accompanying the continuation of a front-page story headlined “Prizefight Star Shot And Killed.” The story reported that the suspect in Hansen’s death was another boxer, Jack Kentworth. The story reported: “According to the story told police, Kentworth called at the LaVelle hotel room in which were Hansen and Miss Norman, drew a gun, threatened to kill them both, and then fired the one shot into Hansen’s body.” The story also reported that Peggy Norman and Kentworth had shared a room at the hotel from September until two weeks before the day of Hansen’s murder, when they separated and she moved into a different room. See related image No. 371N1891. Image note: The name “Peggy Norman” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Letter by Albert D. Glibert, killer of mill superintendent John W. Bevis

Photograph of a letter by mill worker Albert D. Glibert, handwritten before he shot and killed John W. Bevis, superintendent of the Inman-Poulsen mill in Portland, on February 28, 1931. Glibert had been laid off from his job at the mill. The letter reads: “Possibly due to the terrible condition and unfairness of the dominative class, it is time for a proof or demonstration that some drastic measure must be used so as to effect enough changes to permit all the working people a chance for a living, no use to wait for the favored ones that have plenty to bring any suddent [sic] improvement many of the working people will be starved if it depend [sic] on the satified [sic] to make any changes with out [sic] being forced to do so. I have been treated unfairly and I know it / A. D. Glibert.” A photograph of the letter and image No. 371N0923, a portrait of Glibert, were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on March 1, 1931, under the headline “Slayer and Death Note.” The photograph of the letter had the following caption: “The letter which Albert D. Glibert handed to John W. Bevis, superintendent of the Inman-Poulsen mill, before Glibert shot and killed him Saturday morning indicates that Glibert had been brooding over his discharge from the plant and blamed Bevis for it. The missive is pictured here.” Later, on July 30, 1931, the Journal reported that Glibert had pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison. The Journal reported that the plea followed a trial on first-degree murder charges in which the jury was unable to agree on a verdict.

Hatchet used by Tobias Senti in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the hatchet used by Tobias Senti to kill his wife and children. The hatchet is held up by an unidentified person; only the person’s hand is in the frame. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Hatchet with which Senti killed his wife and children.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N5861, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish

Photograph showing dining room crime scene in the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered while playing solitaire at his table and was found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish's killing. See image No. 371N3518, which may also have been taken in Mish’s home after his death.

Crime scene at Portland home of murder victim Simon Mish?

Photograph showing a telephone table in the corner of a room. The table and nearby wall molding are covered with what appears to be blood. A framed photograph is hanging on the wall next to the telephone. The photograph may have been taken at the Northeast Portland home of Simon Mish, age 70, who was murdered there and found dead in his yard on December 12, 1934. The wallpaper in this photograph appears to be the same as in image No. 371N3516, showing Mish’s dining room, where he was killed. John Joseph Osbourne, a Portland special police officer, was convicted of Mish’s killing.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (front, left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to third man from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "The prisoner securely handcuffed as he alighted from train at Montavilla Sunday evening." This photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3581, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to man on left), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "Hickman's arrival at Portland jail." The photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3579, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and Buck Lieuallen after Hickman’s capture

Photograph of Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and State Traffic Officer Buck Lieuallen in Pendleton, probably on December 22, 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, December 23, 1927. The photograph was published under the headline and subhead "Doubling Back Was Fatal to Fugitive / Conclusion of Manhunt That Reached Over the Entire Length of Pacific Coast." The photograph had the following caption: "Above, left to right, Tom Gurdane, Pendleton chief of police, captor; William Edward Hickman, prisoner; Traffic Sergeant Buck Lieuallen, captor." Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, and 373G0076.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

Senti family home, site of murder

Photograph showing the Senti family house near Vancouver, Washington, where Tobias Senti killed his children. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “The house in which the family lived on a small farm.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N3508, 371N5873, and 371N5875.

Senti family dog after death of owners in murder-suicide

Photograph showing the pet dog of the Senti family outdoors on the family’s farm near Vancouver, Washington, after Tobias Senti killed his wife and children and then himself. A similar photograph, image No. 371N3380, was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” The photograph of Trixie had the following additional caption information: “ ’Trixie,’ the dog, that survived Senti's fury.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875. Image note: Photograph is out of focus.

Senti family barn, site of murder

Photograph showing the Senti family barn near Vancouver, Washington, where Tobias Senti killed his wife. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, April 25, 1928. The photographs were published under the headline “Family of Four is Wiped Out.” They had the caption: “Scenes at the Tobias Senti home north of Vancouver [Washington], where Senti on Tuesday slew his wife and little son and daughter with a hatchet, and then blew himself to eternity with dynamite.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Barn in which the body of Mrs. Senti was found.” The photographs accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the deaths. See related image Nos. 371N3380, 371N3508, 371N5861, and 371N5875.