Environmental law--United States

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Environmental law--United States

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Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father’s construction business, her early education, and her father’s death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war. Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger’s senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger’s role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger’s personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers’ senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers’ cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills

This oral history interview with Mary Jane Sills was conducted by Jim Strassmaier from August 8-11, 2003. Administrative notes indicate additional interview sessions were planned but never occurred.

In this interview, Sills discusses her family background and early life in Portland, Oregon. She talks about moving often due to her father's construction business, discusses her early education, and speaks about her father's death in 1939. She discusses attending Reed College and dropping out in 1941 to join the civil service during World War II. She speaks at length about her experience working in Portland for the War Department from 1941 until the end of the war.

Sills discusses her experience working as an aide to U.S. Senator Richard Neuberger and U.S. Senator Maurine Neuberger from 1954 to 1967. She talks about their campaigns, their positions on environmental issues, and setting up Dick Neuberger's Senate office in Washington, D.C. She also talks about Dick Neuberger's role in the growth of the Democratic Party in Oregon, and about other prominent Oregon Democrats. Sills describes Maurine Neuberger's personality and talks about other members of the Neubergers' senatorial staff. She speaks at length about office management, including keeping the office supplied, handling correspondence, and managing staff. She closes the interview by describing her living situation in Washington, D.C., and caring for Muffet, the Neubergers' cat.

Sills, Mary Jane, 1922-2010

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 04]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 06]

Tape 3, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 05]

Tape 3, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 09]

Tape 5, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 10]

Tape 6, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 07]

Tape 4, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 08]

Tape 4, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 12]

Tape 7, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 11]

Tape 6, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 14]

Tape 8, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 13]

Tape 8, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 16]

Tape 9, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 15]

Tape 9, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 17]

Tape 10, Side 1. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

Oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson [Sound Recording 18]

Tape 10, Side 2. This oral history interview with Tom J. Imeson was conducted by Michael O’Rourke in Salem, Oregon, and at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, from September 14 to December 9, 1988. In this interview, Imeson discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his early interest in politics. He then discusses studying political science at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He talks about how he became a member of U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield’s staff in 1969 as a legislative aide specializing in natural resources in. He describes legislation he worked on, other members of Hatfield’s staff, and Hatfield’s opposition to the Vietnam War. He talks about Hatfield’s relationship with the Nixon administration, as well as Hatfield’s relationship with other Oregon politicians. He speaks at length about Hatfield’s 1972 re-election campaign. He talks about the changes in the staff after Hatfield was re-elected, including the increased role of Gerry Frank; Imeson’s marriage to fellow staffer Brenda Thangmeyer; and the Watergate scandal. He speaks at length about legislation he worked on regarding environmental, Native American, and logging issues. He discusses Hatfield’s opposition to nuclear power, Hatfield’s work on the Appropriations Committee, and Hatfield’s relationship with Oregon governors, particularly Tom McCall and Neil Goldschmidt. Imeson discusses running Hatfield’s Oregon office from 1981 to 1985. He talks about some of his duties, including working with the Army Corps of Engineers. He also discusses a real estate scandal that affected Hatfield’s 1984 re-election campaign. He talks about Hatfield’s main accomplishments and legislative agenda, and about Hatfield’s personal and family life. Imeson discusses his career since leaving Hatfield’s staff, including working for PacifiCorp and as chief of staff for Governor Neil Goldschmidt, as well as his continued relationship with Hatfield. He closes the interview by discussing at length the passage of the Wild Scenic Rivers bill.

Imeson, Thomas J. (Thomas James), 1950-

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