Education, Secondary--Oregon--Portland

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Education, Secondary--Oregon--Portland

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Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Joyce Braden Harris was nominated by Oregonians as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Harris discusses her family background and early life with her grandmother in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, and then with her parents and siblings in Madrid, Spain. She discusses her experiences as the only member of her family to speak Spanish and as the only black person in her class. She also describes growing up in Harlem and its community. She discusses her education in New York, including a teacher strike in 1968; starting a black literature class; racism that she, her teachers, and other students faced; and her early activism and leadership roles. She also talks about the Vietnam War, particularly its effect on two of her brothers, who served in the Air Force during that time. She discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including how she chose that school. She also speaks about her and her brothers’ experiences with police. She talks about events that shaped her political outlook, including the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.; her love of mystery novels by black women authors; and people who have influenced her. She discusses some of the awards she has received, her involvement in annual Kwanzaa celebrations, and her work as an educator. In the second interview session, conducted on December 3, 2018, Harris discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, including her efforts to make the curriculum less Eurocentric. She talks about her involvement with Ron Herndon and the black community in Portland; racism she experienced and witnessed; and her involvement with the Black Student Union. She describes the origins of the Black Educational Center, which provided free summer education to black youth and became a full-time private school in 1974. She also talks about continuing her studies at Portland State University. She speaks at length about her work as an educator, including designing lessons for her students, working with parents, and taking her students on field trips to meet public figures. She then discusses working at the Talking Drum bookstore and her involvement in Portland Kwanzaa celebrations. She speaks at length about working with Portland Public Schools to improve the educational environment, particularly for black students. She talks about working with the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory beginning in 1992. She closes the session by discussing her family life. In the third session, conducted on December 12, 2018, Harris discusses the work of the Black United Front towards providing quality, non-racist education. She also talks about her involvement with the BUF. She talks about the presence of police in schools, the rise of charter schools, and organizing black college fairs. She discusses her involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, including the coalition’s efforts toward a federal investigation of police violence in Portland. She also outlines a brief history of police killings of black people in Portland and describes some of the memorials she attended. She then describes organizing a welcoming committee and other volunteer efforts for New Orleans evacuees in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She also shares the story of arranging a funeral for a baby, who was found in a dumpster, and whom she named Baby Precious. She closes the interview by talking about some of the awards and other recognition she has received, and her plans for the future.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Joyce Braden Harris was nominated by Oregonians as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the first interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Harris discusses her family background and early life with her grandmother in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, and then with her parents and siblings in Madrid, Spain. She discusses her experiences as the only member of her family to speak Spanish and as the only black person in her class. She also describes growing up in Harlem and its community. She discusses her education in New York, including a teacher strike in 1968; starting a black literature class; racism that she, her teachers, and other students faced; and her early activism and leadership roles. She also talks about the Vietnam War, particularly its effect on two of her brothers, who served in the Air Force during that time. She discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including how she chose that school. She also speaks about her and her brothers’ experiences with police. She talks about events that shaped her political outlook, including the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.; her love of mystery novels by black women authors; and people who have influenced her. She discusses some of the awards she has received, her involvement in annual Kwanzaa celebrations, and her work as an educator.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris [Sound Recording 03]

Session 3. This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Joyce Braden Harris was nominated by Oregonians as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the third session, conducted on December 12, 2018, Harris discusses the work of the Black United Front towards providing quality, non-racist education. She also talks about her involvement with the BUF. She talks about the presence of police in schools, the rise of charter schools, and organizing black college fairs. She discusses her involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, including the coalition’s efforts toward a federal investigation of police violence in Portland. She also outlines a brief history of police killings of black people in Portland and describes some of the memorials she attended. She then describes organizing a welcoming committee and other volunteer efforts for New Orleans evacuees in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She also shares the story of arranging a funeral for a baby, who was found in a dumpster, and whom she named Baby Precious. She closes the interview by talking about some of the awards and other recognition she has received, and her plans for the future.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris [Sound Recording 02]

Session 2. This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Joyce Braden Harris was nominated by Oregonians as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in three sessions. In the second interview session, conducted on December 3, 2018, Harris discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, including her efforts to make the curriculum less Eurocentric. She talks about her involvement with Ron Herndon and the black community in Portland; racism she experienced and witnessed; and her involvement with the Black Student Union. She describes the origins of the Black Educational Center, which provided free summer education to black youth and became a full-time private school in 1974. She also talks about continuing her studies at Portland State University. She speaks at length about her work as an educator, including designing lessons for her students, working with parents, and taking her students on field trips to meet public figures. She then discusses working at the Talking Drum bookstore and her involvement in Portland Kwanzaa celebrations. She speaks at length about working with Portland Public Schools to improve the educational environment, particularly for black students. She talks about working with the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory beginning in 1992. She closes the session by discussing her family life.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris

This oral history interview with Joyce Braden Harris was conducted by Jan Dilg at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon, in three sessions from November 19 to December 12, 2018. Harris was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director.

In the first interview session, conducted on November 19, 2018, Harris discusses her family background and early life with her grandmother in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, and then with her parents and siblings in Madrid, Spain. She discusses her experiences as the only member of her family to speak Spanish and as the only black person in her class. She also describes growing up in Harlem and its community. She discusses her education in New York, including a teacher strike in 1968; starting a black literature class; racism that she, her teachers, and other students faced; and her early activism and leadership roles. She also talks about the Vietnam War, particularly its effect on two of her brothers, who served in the Air Force during that time. She discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, including how she chose that school. She also speaks about her and her brothers' experiences with police. She talks about events that shaped her political outlook, including the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.; her love of mystery novels by black women authors; and people who have influenced her. She discusses some of the awards she has received, her involvement in annual Kwanzaa celebrations, and her work as an educator.

In the second interview session, conducted on December 3, 2018, Harris discusses her experiences at Reed College in Portland, including her efforts to make the curriculum less Eurocentric. She talks about her involvement with Ron Herndon and the black community in Portland; racism she experienced and witnessed; and her involvement with the Black Student Union. She describes the origins of the Black Educational Center, which provided free summer education to black youth and became a full-time private school in 1974. She also talks about continuing her studies at Portland State University. She speaks at length about her work as an educator, including designing lessons for her students, working with parents, and taking her students on field trips to meet public figures. She then discusses working at the Talking Drum bookstore and her involvement in Portland Kwanzaa celebrations. She speaks at length about working with Portland Public Schools to improve the educational environment, particularly for black students. She talks about working with the Northwest Regional Education Laboratory beginning in 1992. She closes the session by discussing her family life.

In the third session, conducted on December 12, 2018, Harris discusses the work of the Black United Front towards providing quality, non-racist education. She also talks about her involvement with the BUF. She talks about the presence of police in schools, the rise of charter schools, and organizing black college fairs. She discusses her involvement with the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition for Justice and Police Reform, including the coalition's efforts toward a federal investigation of police violence in Portland. She also outlines a brief history of police killings of black people in Portland and describes some of the memorials she attended. She then describes organizing a welcoming committee and other volunteer efforts for New Orleans evacuees in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. She also shares the story of arranging a funeral for a baby who was found in a dumpster, and whom she named Baby Precious. She closes the interview by talking about some of the awards and other recognition she has received, and her plans for the future.

Harris, Joyce Braden, 1951-

Oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on March 30, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Roy Feldenheimer and Henry C.C. Stevens were also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Kletzer discusses her education at the Portland Academy, a private high school that operated from 1889 to 1916 and was located at SW 13th Avenue and SW Montgomery Street, in Portland, Oregon. She describes the curriculum of the school and talks about her teachers and classmates. She then speaks about her involvement with the Parent Teacher Association and the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society. She shares her memories of attending the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition and of spending a summer at the Cloud Cap Inn in 1910 with Portland Academy staff. She closes the interview by talking about her marriage to William Kletzer and raising a family on a ranch on the Jesse Applegate donation land claim.

Kletzer, Virginia, 1887-1982

Oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on March 30, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Roy Feldenheimer and Henry C.C. Stevens were also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Kletzer discusses her education at the Portland Academy, a private high school that operated from 1889 to 1916 and was located at SW 13th Avenue and SW Montgomery Street, in Portland, Oregon. She describes the curriculum of the school and talks about her teachers and classmates. She then speaks about her involvement with the Parent Teacher Association and the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society. She shares her memories of attending the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition and of spending a summer at the Cloud Cap Inn in 1910 with Portland Academy staff. She closes the interview by talking about her marriage to William Kletzer and raising a family on a ranch on the Jesse Applegate donation land claim.

Kletzer, Virginia, 1887-1982

Oral history interview with Henry C. C. Stevens [Sound Recording]

Reel 1. This oral history interview with Henry C. C. Stevens was conducted by Charles Digregorio on January 5, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. An incomplete transcript is also available, and includes an addendum provided by Stevens after the interview.

In this interview, Stevens discusses his family background and early life in the Nob Hill neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. He talks about the people who lived in the neighborhood, about the businesses and schools in the area, and about his experience with childhood diseases. He speaks about his education at Portland Academy, including his teachers and classmates. He shares his memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition. He talks about his service in the U.S. military during World War I, shares his reasons for not completing college, and speaks about his career in the insurance business.

Stevens, Henry C. C., 1898-1979

Oral history interview with Henry C. C. Stevens

  • SR 9400
  • Collection
  • 1976-01-05

This oral history interview with Henry C. C. Stevens was conducted by Charles Digregorio on January 5, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. An incomplete transcript is also available, and includes an addendum provided by Stevens after the interview.

In this interview, Stevens discusses his family background and early life in the Nob Hill neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. He talks about the people who lived in the neighborhood, about the businesses and schools in the area, and about his experience with childhood diseases. He speaks about his education at Portland Academy, including his teachers and classmates. He shares his memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition. He talks about his service in the U.S. military during World War I, shares his reasons for not completing college, and speaks about his career in the insurance business.

Stevens, Henry C. C., 1898-1979

Oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer

  • SR 9393
  • Collection
  • 1976-03-30

This oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on March 30, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Roy Feldenheimer and Henry C.C. Stevens were also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Kletzer discusses her education at the Portland Academy, a private high school that operated from 1889 to 1916 and was located at SW 13th Avenue and SW Montgomery Street, in Portland, Oregon. She describes the curriculum of the school and talks about her teachers and classmates. She then speaks about her involvement with the Parent Teacher Association and the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society. She shares her memories of attending the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition and of spending a summer at the Cloud Cap Inn in 1910 with Portland Academy staff. She closes the interview by talking about her marriage to William Kletzer and raising a family on a ranch on the Jesse Applegate donation land claim.

Kletzer, Virginia, 1887-1982

Oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Virginia M. Kletzer was conducted by Charles Digregorio at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon, on March 30, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. Roy Feldenheimer and Henry C.C. Stevens were also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Kletzer discusses her education at the Portland Academy, a private high school that operated from 1889 to 1916 and was located at SW 13th Avenue and SW Montgomery Street, in Portland, Oregon. She describes the curriculum of the school and talks about her teachers and classmates. She then speaks about her involvement with the Parent Teacher Association and the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society. She shares her memories of attending the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition and of spending a summer at the Cloud Cap Inn in 1910 with Portland Academy staff. She closes the interview by talking about her marriage to William Kletzer and raising a family on a ranch on the Jesse Applegate donation land claim.

Kletzer, Virginia, 1887-1982

Oral history interview with Benjamin W. Hill

  • SR 9557
  • Collection
  • 1978-02-27

This oral history interview with Benjamin W. Hill was conducted by Roberta Watts in Portland, Oregon, on February 27, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Hill discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his education at Bishop Scott Academy and at the Hill Military Academy, which was founded by his father, Joseph Wood Hill. He talks about working for logging companies in Washington and Oregon, then describes how he became headmaster of the Hill Military Academy in 1922. He speaks about the operations and administration of the academy, about its different locations, and about its curriculum. He also discusses his experiences at Yale University from 1909 to 1912. He closes the interview by speaking further about his early life in Portland.

Hill, Benjamin W. (Benjamin Wood), 1890-1981

Oral history interview with Benjamin W. Hill [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Benjamin W. Hill was conducted by Roberta Watts in Portland, Oregon, on February 27, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Hill discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his education at Bishop Scott Academy and at the Hill Military Academy, which was founded by his father, Joseph Wood Hill. He talks about working for logging companies in Washington and Oregon, then describes how he became headmaster of the Hill Military Academy in 1922. He speaks about the operations and administration of the academy, about its different locations, and about its curriculum. He also discusses his experiences at Yale University from 1909 to 1912. He closes the interview by speaking further about his early life in Portland.

Hill, Benjamin W. (Benjamin Wood), 1890-1981

Oral history interview with Benjamin W. Hill [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Benjamin W. Hill was conducted by Roberta Watts in Portland, Oregon, on February 27, 1978, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program.

In this interview, Hill discusses his family background and early life in Portland, including his education at Bishop Scott Academy and at the Hill Military Academy, which was founded by his father, Joseph Wood Hill. He talks about working for logging companies in Washington and Oregon, then describes how he became headmaster of the Hill Military Academy in 1922. He speaks about the operations and administration of the academy, about its different locations, and about its curriculum. He also discusses his experiences at Yale University from 1909 to 1912. He closes the interview by speaking further about his early life in Portland.

Hill, Benjamin W. (Benjamin Wood), 1890-1981

Oral history interview with Henry C. C. Stevens [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Henry C. C. Stevens was conducted by Charles Digregorio on January 5, 1976, as part of the Oregon Historical Society Research Library's oral history program. An incomplete transcript is also available, and includes an addendum provided by Stevens after the interview.

In this interview, Stevens discusses his family background and early life in the Nob Hill neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. He talks about the people who lived in the neighborhood, about the businesses and schools in the area, and about his experience with childhood diseases. He speaks about his education at Portland Academy, including his teachers and classmates. He shares his memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition. He talks about his service in the U.S. military during World War I, shares his reasons for not completing college, and speaks about his career in the insurance business.

Stevens, Henry C. C., 1898-1979