Criminals

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Criminals

18 Collections results for Criminals

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Albert D. Glibert, killer of mill superintendent John W. Bevis

Head and shoulders portrait of mill worker and murder suspect A. D. Glibert. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on February 28, 1931, and again on March 1, 1931. On February 28, the photograph was published on the Journal’s front page under the headline “Grudge Leads to Murder.” The photograph had the following caption: “Albert D. Glibert, who today shot and killed John W. Bevis, superintendent of the Inman Poulsen mill, because he blamed Bevis for his discharge. Glibert then turned his weapon on Bevis’ assistant, George W. Martin, and inflicted serious injury.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Mill Boss Slain, Aide Badly Shot.” On March 1, the photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal with image No. 371N3218, depicting a note that Glibert wrote before the shooting. On that day, this photograph had the following caption: “Taken by a Journal staff cameraman a few minutes after Glibert was overpowered by fellow employees.” Later, on July 30, 1931, the Journal reported that Glibert had pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison. The Journal reported that the plea followed a trial on first-degree murder charges in which the jury was unable to agree on a verdict. Image note: The name “A. D. Gilbert [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the photograph. Image note: The photograph shows discoloration from deterioration of the negative.

Frank La Belle, murder suspect, and unidentified man at Portland police headquarters

Photograph, taken November 30, 1935, showing murder suspect Frank La Belle (left) of Jewel, Oregon, and an unidentified man sitting at a table. The man on the right is holding a pencil and a piece of paper filled with handwriting. A cropped version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, December 1, 1935, under the headline “Death Signs the Register.” The photograph had the following caption: “Frank La Belle, 68-year-old barber. La Belle was photographed at police headquarters as he told the sordid story of a ‘suicide pact’ that was only half fulfilled.” The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Killer Confesses Shooting Woman.” The story reported: “Detectives searching the city for the slayer who left Mrs. Myrtle A. Service dying in the Belmont hotel, 230 N. W. 6th avenue, from a bullet in the neck Saturday, arrested a 68-year-old-man at 4;15 p.m. and held him under a first-degree murder charge.” The story further reported that Service had separated from her husband a month earlier, and that under police questioning, La Belle had admitted to the shooting, saying he and Service “had made a suicide pact that went awry after he had shot the woman.” Image note: The name “Frank La Belle” is written on the negative and is visible at the bottom of the image.

Frank La Belle, murder suspect, at Portland police headquarters

Photograph of murder suspect Frank La Belle of Jewel, Oregon, sitting at a table and holding a cigar. He is looking left at a person mostly outside the frame. The photograph was taken at Portland police headquarters on November 30, 1935, after La Belle’s arrest. A similar photograph, image No. 372A0331, and a story about La Belle were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on December 1, 1935. the story, headlined “Killer Confesses Shooting Woman,” reported: “Detectives searching the city for the slayer who left Mrs. Myrtle A. Service dying in the Belmont hotel, 230 N. W. 6th avenue, from a bullet in the neck Saturday, arrested a 68-year-old-man at 4;15 p.m. and held him under a first-degree murder charge.” The story further reported that Service had separated from her husband a month earlier, and that under police questioning, La Belle had admitted to the shooting, saying he and service “had made a suicide pact that went awry after he had shot the woman.” Image note: The name “Frank La Belle” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

John B. Kawacinski, killer of Harry I. Pawluk, at Multnomah County Jail

Head and shoulders portrait of a man at the Multnomah County Jail. He is sitting in a chair and facing to the right. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal city edition on Monday, March 7, 1921, under the headline “Slayer Of His Shipmate.” The photograph had the following caption: “John Boleslaw Kawacinski, known also as John Bruno, who has confessed to the killing of Harry I. Pawluk, second cook on the steamship Montague, arrested at Seattle Saturday and now being held in the Multnomah county jail while real facts of grim story of debt, smuggling, and intrigue are being straightened out by the authorities.” The photograph accompanied a story with the headline “Murderer of Pawluk Views Crime Scene” and the subheading “John Kawacinski, Who Confessed He Killed Shipmate on Barnes Road, Pleads Self-Defense; Police Look for Woman in Case.” On Thursday, April 14, 1921, the Journal reported that Kawacinski had been convicted of second-degree murder, and on Monday, April 18, 1921, the paper reported that he had been sentenced to life in the Oregon State Penitentiary. Image note: The text “Bruno, John / Murderer of Pawluk” is written on the negative sleeve.

John Cyril Liard on witness stand

Photograph showing John Cyril Liard sitting on the witness stand in January 1919. Liard was on trial for second-degree murder in the death of Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley. Liard was accused of killing Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. The Journal reported that a woman, Augusta Carlson, had told police she was in the car at the time of the murder. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 376G023, of Carlson, were published on Page 15 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 12, 1919, under the headline “Versions of Crime Do Not Agree.” The photograph had the following caption: “Augusta Carlson and John Cyril Liard photographed by The Journal photographer as they sat in Judge Gantenbein’s court, where the latter is on trial on a charge of second degree murder for the fatal shooting of Frank Walter Twombley, deputy sheriff, last November.” The photographs accompanied a story, headlined “Liard Seeks To Prove An Alibi In Murder Case.” That story reported that Carlson and Liard had given conflicting accounts during the trial; Carlson had testified that Liard had killed Twombley, and Liard had testified that he was at home when the crime occurred, but Carlson was out in his car. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison. See additional related image No. 376G0330. Image note: The text “Laird [sic] trial” is written on the negative sleeve.

John Cyril Liard on witness stand during his murder trial

Photograph showing John Cyril Liard (center) sitting on the witness stand during his trial on a second-degree murder charge. At left are a group of men looking toward Liard. The photograph was probably taken on Saturday, January 11, 1919, when Liard took the stand in his own defense. Liard was accused of killing Deputy Sheriff Frank W. Twombley after a robbery on the Interstate Bridge in Portland on November 19, 1918. In a story on January 7, 1919, about jury selection for the trial, the Journal gave a summary of the case. It reported that Twombley, who was on duty at one of the approaches to the bridge and was unaware of the robbery, had attempted to stop the robber’s car as it sped away. The driver shot and killed Twombley as he attempted to make the stop. On Tuesday, January 14, 1919, the Journal reported that Liard had been convicted and sentenced to life in prison. See related image Nos. 376G0023 and 376G0331. Image note: The text “Laird [sic] trial” is written on the negative sleeve.

Joseph John Osbourne testifying during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish

Photograph showing Joseph John Osbourne sitting on the witness stand in Multnomah County Circuit Court as he testifies during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish, age 70, who was found dead in a pond at his Northeast Portland home on December 12, 1934. The photograph was taken on March 25, 1935. That day, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about Osbourne’s testimony and a related photograph, image No. 372A0796, also showing Osbourne on the stand. On March 28, 1935, the Journal reported that the jury had convicted Osbourne of second-degree murder, which carried a mandatory life sentence. Image note: The text “Osborne [sic] Trial” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Joseph John Osbourne testifying during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish

Photograph showing Joseph John Osbourne sitting on the witness stand in Multnomah County Circuit Court as he testifies during his trial for the murder of Simon Mish, age 70, who was found dead in a pond at his Northeast Portland home on December 12, 1934. The photograph was taken on March 25, 1935. That day, a cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 18 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “On the Stand in His Own Defense.” The photograph had the following caption: “Joseph John Osbourne, on trail for his life in connection with the fishpond murder of Simon Mish, takes the stand as witness and leans forward to answer cross-examination of Deputy District Attorney Joe Price. The head of Circuit Judge Crawford is seen behind books on his desk in the foreground.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about Osbourne’s testimony. On March 28, 1935, the Journal reported that the jury had convicted Osbourne of second-degree murder, which carried a mandatory life sentence. See related image No. 372A0795. Image note: The text “Osborne [sic] Trial” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Mrs. Pearl Billings in jail after holdup at service station

Portrait of 18-year-old Pearl Billings sitting in a chair in her cell at the Clackamas County Jail in Oregon City on Saturday, February 21, 1931. According to a story published on the front page of the Oregon Journal that day, Billings was arrested after participating in a holdup with 22-year-old William Wheeler at the Robinwood service station near Lake Oswego on February 20, 1931. During the robbery, Wheeler was shot and killed by the service station’s proprietor, R. W. LaDue. According to the story, Billings told police Wheeler had kidnapped her and she had no knowledge of plans to hold up the service station until they were inside. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N1454, showing Mr. and Mrs. LaDue, accompanied the story. The photographs were published under the headline "Bandit Victim 'Gets His Man.' " This photograph had the following caption: "Mrs. Pearl Billings, companion of the dead man. She went outside and started the car's engine for the proposed escape. Mrs. Billings fled from the scene but was captured by sheriff [E. T.] Mass of Clackamas county a short while later. She is held in the county jail at Oregon City." Image note: The name “Mrs Pearl Billings” and the number 18 in a circle are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image.

Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and Buck Lieuallen after Hickman’s capture

Photograph of Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane, William Edward Hickman, and State Traffic Officer Buck Lieuallen in Pendleton, probably on December 22, 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal on Friday, December 23, 1927. The photograph was published under the headline and subhead "Doubling Back Was Fatal to Fugitive / Conclusion of Manhunt That Reached Over the Entire Length of Pacific Coast." The photograph had the following caption: "Above, left to right, Tom Gurdane, Pendleton chief of police, captor; William Edward Hickman, prisoner; Traffic Sergeant Buck Lieuallen, captor." Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, and 373G0076.

Norr, Roy (Photographer)

William Edward Hickman and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane

Photograph showing William Edward Hickman (right) and Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane (left, in background) in December 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928. He was executed in October 1928. A cropped version of this photograph was one of several, including image Nos. 371N3579 and 371N3581, that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927, under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime.” This photograph had the caption “Hickman and Police Chief Gurdane.” The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Also see image Nos. 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076. Image note: The text “Hiekman + Gurdane” (sic) is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

William Edward Hickman in jail in Pendleton, Oregon

Full-length portrait of William Edward Hickman sitting in a jail cell in Pendleton, Oregon, probably on December 23 or December 24, 1927. Hickman, who was wanted in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker in Los Angeles, was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and State Traffic Officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. Hickman was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and was executed that October. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, December 24, 1927, under the headline “The Trapped ‘Fox.’ ” The photograph had the following caption: “William Edward Hickman speculates upon his fate within the narrow confines of his jail cell in Pendleton.” Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, and 371N3581.

Photo International

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to third man from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "The prisoner securely handcuffed as he alighted from train at Montavilla Sunday evening." This photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3581, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (front, left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left) in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as as Los Angeles police escorted him from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the mid-December murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Monday, December 26, 1927. The photograph had the caption: "Hickman's arrival at Portland jail." The photograph was published under the headline "Hickman Started On Return to Scene of Atrocious Crime," along with image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3579, and several other photographs. The photographs accompanied a story titled "Hickman in California; Calm Again." Hickman was tried and convicted in California in early 1928, and he was executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (second from left), probably taken in Portland on December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3579, 371N3580, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.

William Edward Hickman with police during extradition to California

Photograph of William Edward Hickman (center, handcuffed to man on left), probably taken in Portland on Sunday, December 25, 1927, as Los Angeles police escorted Hickman from Pendleton, Oregon, to California to face charges in the murder of 12-year-old Marion Parker. Hickman was captured by Pendleton Police Chief Tom Gurdane and state traffic officer Buck Lieuallen near Echo, Oregon, on December 22, 1927. He was subsequently extradited to California, where he was tried and convicted in early 1928 and executed that October. Also see image Nos. 371N1116, 371N3566, 371N3569, 371N3579, 371N3580A, 371N3581, 371N3590, and 373G0076.