Constitution (Frigate)

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Constitution (Frigate)

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Constitution (Frigate)

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Constitution (Frigate)

32 Collections results for Constitution (Frigate)

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Joseph K. Carson and Dan E. Gould boarding USS Constitution?

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson and a man who may be Dan E. Gould walking up a ramp. Behind them are two men in uniform, one carrying the United States flag and the other carrying the Oregon state flag. A crowd is visible in the background. The photograph may show Carson, Gould, and other members of a reception committee boarding the frigate USS Constitution on August 2, 1933, when the ship and crew arrived for a three-week visit in Portland as part of a national tour. The ship was moored at Swan Island. In a story about the ship and its arrival on August 3, 1933, the Oregon Journal reported: “As soon as lines to the dock were made fast Lieutenant-Commander Henry Hartley, commanding the ship, invited the reception committee on board. Headed by Federal Judge James A. Fee, representing governor J. L. Meier, Mayor Joseph K. Carson, Dan E. Gould, chairman of the general committee, the group filed over the gangway.” Also see image No. 371N3740. Image note: Image shows marks due to negative damage.

USS Constitution under way on Columbia River off Wauna, Oregon, en route to Portland

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution sailing on the Columbia River near Wauna, Oregon, en route to Portland on Wednesday, August 2, 1933. That day, a similar photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal under the headline “The Ship That Was a Navy When the Nation Was Young.” That photograph had the following caption: “The United States frigate Constitution in the Columbia River off Wauna on her way to Portland for a 20-day visit. The picture was taken Wednesday from the air by Ralph Vincent, Journal staff photographer, who flew to meet the veteran of the wars with the Barbary coast pirates and of 1812, in an airplane of Rasmussen-Meadows, Inc. The U. S. S. Grebe, mine sweeper, is towing the gallant old craft, while the river towboat Shaver acts as an auxiliary. Puget island is in the background [at upper left]. The ship was under the brow of scenic Clatsop Crest on the lower Columbia River highway when the picture was taken.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Old Frigate Nears Berth In Portland.” Also see image Nos. 371N3703 and 371N3708.

Vincent, Ralph

USS Constitution, tugboat Shaver, and USS Grebe under way on Columbia River near Puget Island, Washington

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution (center), towed by the USS Grebe and accompanied by the tugboat Shaver, on the Columbia River near Puget Island, Washington, on Wednesday, August 2, 1933. The frigate and crew were en route to Portland for a three-week visit, from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. Also see image Nos. 371N3702 and 371N3708.

Vincent, Ralph

USS Constitution under way on Columbia River?

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution under way, probably on the Columbia River en route to Portland on Wednesday, August 2, 1933. The ship and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. A tugboat sailing alongside the Constitution is partially visible at the rear of the ship.

USS Constitution and tugboat off Swan Island, Portland

Photograph, taken from shore, showing the frigate USS constitution and an accompanying tugboat under way on the Willamette River in Portland in August 1933. A small group of spectators are watching from the beach. In the background is Swan Island, where the frigate was moored while the ship and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933. The visit was part of a national tour.

USS Constitution under way on Willamette River, leaving Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and an accompanying tugboat on the Willamette River off Waud Bluff as the ship departs Portland on Tuesday, August 22, 1933. The frigate and crew visited Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3716 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal the day the ship departed. The photographs were published under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “The Constitution as she appeared below Columbia university on the way down river shortly after 6 a.m. Tuesday after a 21-day stay here.” Columbia University is now the University of Portland.

USS Constitution and tugboat sailing under St. Johns Bridge

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and a Shaver Transportation Company tugboat sailing under the St. Johns Bridge in Portland in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 22, 1933, when the frigate departed for Kalama after a visit to Portland as part of a national tour. At far right is the USS Grebe, which accompanied and towed the Constitution on the tour. A story, headlined “Old Frigate Leaves After 21-Day Stay” and two related images, Nos. 371N3705 and 371N3716, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 22, 1933. See related image No. 371N5539.

USS Constitution and tugboat under way on Columbia River?

Photograph, taken from a high angle, showing the frigate USS Constitution and an accompanying tugboat under way in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited Portland for three weeks as part of a national tour. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, when the frigate was sailing on the Columbia River en route to Portland.

USS Constitution and USS Grebe arriving in Portland?

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution (left) and its companion ship, the USS Grebe (right) sailing on the Willamette River between Waud Bluff (background, right) and Swan Island in Portland in August 1933, when the ships and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. The photograph may have been taken on August 2, 1933, the day they arrived.

USS Constitution and USS Grebe under way on Columbia River near Wauna, Oregon?

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution (left) being towed by its companion ship, the USS Grebe, in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, while the ships were sailing on the Columbia River off Wauna, Oregon, and Puget Island, Washington, en route to Portland. The Constitution and its crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. Also see image Nos. 371N3702 and 371N3703.

Vincent, Ralph

USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland, in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. A crowd is partially visible in the foreground. This photograph may have been taken on Friday, August 18, 1933, when a large crowd of spectators watched sailors set the sails on the frigate’s mizzenmast. See image No. 371N3712.

Sailors climbing into position on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing sailors on the USS Constitution climbing ladders toward a platform on the mizzenmast in August 1933. The photograph was taken while the frigate and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. The photograph may have been taken on August 18, 1933, when sailors on the Constitution set sails on the mizzenmast. A similar photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 19, 1933, along with image No. 371N3711 and a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Crowd watching crew members set sails on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing a crowd of spectators watching crew members set sails on the mizzenmast of the USS Constitution on Friday, August 18, 1933. The ship was moored on Swan Island, Portland, during a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, August 19, 1933, under the headline “Constitution Preens Wings.” This photograph had the following caption: “While thousands of Portlanders looked on from the airport and the hill sides, sailors on ‘Old Ironsides’ set sails on the mizzenmast of the old warrior late Friday. Top picture shows the sails unfurled.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver and son looking at cannon aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (right) and his son, Louis J. Gulliver Jr., a midshipman third class, looking at a cannon aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in Portland on August 11, 1933, after Commander Gulliver returned from a 30-day leave and resumed command of the frigate. The ship and crew were in Portland on a three-week visit as part of a national tour. Gulliver’s wife, son, and three daughters accompanied him to Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3719 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Gulliver showing a 1933 model midshipman, his son, Louis J. Jr., what a midshipman of 1812 should know about ordnance.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (second from left), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (right) and unidentified sailors saluting as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after returning from a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken aboard the Constitution on August 11, 1933, while the ship and crew were in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3713 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, left, stepping onto the decks of ‘Old Ironsides,’ with side-boys at salute, and welcomed by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Hartley, who had command of the frigate during Gulliver’s absence on leave. Hartley relinquished command and resumed his duties as executive officer.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Old Ironsides.” The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the honors marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley shaking hands as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken on August 11, 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return, headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Ironsides” was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. See related image Nos. 371N3713 and 371N3719. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Officers aboard USS Constitution during visit to Portland

Full-length portrait of seven officers standing in row and facing front aboard the frigate USS Constitution in August 1933 during a three-week visit by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Officers of the ship (reading from left), Lieutenant David W. Tolson, Lieutenant W. J. Dean (supply corps), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer; Commander Louis J. Gulliver, captain; Lieutenant Joseph C. Van Cleve, Lieutenant J. Y. Dannenberg and Lieutenant D. W. Lyon (medical corps).” Also see image Nos. 371N3724, 371N3730, and 371N3736, which were published with this photograph.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting a plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard the frigate USS Constitution on Thursday, August 10, 1933, during the Constitution’s three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, a cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 5 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Gets Plaque.” The photograph had the following caption: “Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, commanding the frigate Constitution, with a plaque commemorating the visit of the historic ship in Portland harbor. The presentation was made at 10:30 a.m. Thursday on board the ship.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the presentation of the plaque. See related image Nos. 371N3729 and 371N3739.

Mayor Joseph K. Carson presenting plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing three unidentified men watching as Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson presents a bronze plaque to Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley aboard the frigate USS Constitution on Thursday, August 10, 1933, during the Constitution’s three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, the Oregon Journal published a story about the presentation and a related photograph, image No. 371N3729. According to the story, the plaque commemorated the ship’s visit to Portland, and Carson was accompanied by “City Commissioners Riley, Bean, and Bennett,” who may be the three unidentified men shown in this photograph. Also see related image No. 371N3739.

Samuel M. Mears looking at rope aboard frigate USS Constitution

Photograph showing Samuel M. Mears holding a loop of thick rope aboard the frigate USS Constitution in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited Portland from August 2 to August 22 as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Samuel M. Mears, president of Portland Cordage company and midshipman on the Constitution in 1871, is an honored visitor. He gave $600 worth of cordage for rerigging the ship.” The photograph of Mears was probably taken earlier, on Friday, August 18, 1933; his visit to the ship is mentioned in a story published on Page 2 of that day’s Oregon Journal. The story, describing activities on the ship on August 18, reported that Mears had lived on the Constitution for nine months as a midshipman in the naval academy. Image note: Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3724, and 371N3736, which were published with the photograph of Mears.

Major George E. Sandy presents U. S. history books for library of USS Constitution

Photograph, taken aboard the frigate USS Constitution, showing Major George E. Sandy (third from left) presenting a two-volume set of James Truslow Adams’ “March of Democracy” for the ship’s library on August 18, 1933. The presentation occurred during the ship’s three-week visit to Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on the day of the presentation. The photograph had the headline “Democracy Marches on ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” It had the following caption: “Presentation of a set of United States history books to the library of the frigate Constitution Friday morning by major George E. Sandy on behalf of Rose City post No. 35, American legion. Left, Boatswain’s Mate First Class Metress; Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding the ship; Major Sandy, presenting the books; Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer, and Marine Sergeant Billett.” The photograph accompanied a story, headlined “Frigate Gets History She Helped Make.” The story gave the following explanation about the gift of the books: “When the ship arrived in Portland, it was discovered that the library issued by the bureau of navigation did not have a history of the United States or an English dictionary. Lieutenant David W. Tolson commented on the lack and the embarrassment caused at times when questions on points of history were asked. The comment was overheard by Sandy, who set about to rectify the condition.”

Seaman G. B. Howe of USS Constitution and Lieutenant Commander J. C. Ghormley looking at coins from China

Photograph, taken aboard the frigate USS Constitution on August 18, 1933, showing Seaman G. B. Howe and retired Lieutenant Commander J. C. Ghormley looking at coins from China. The photograph was taken during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on the day the picture was taken. The photograph accompanied a story that provided the following information: “Among the several interesting events on board the beloved veteran of the navy [the USS Constitution] at her Swan island berth today was identification of the member of the crew promised a ‘real party’ in Portland by Lieutenant Commander J. Carlos Ghormley, U. S. N. R., when he visited the ship at Washington navy yard December 8, 1932. At that time Dr. Ghormley had two Chinese coins, exactly alike. He gave one to a sailor with instructions to match it with the other on arrival in Portland, and that the sailor would be royally entertained. Boarding the ship this morning Dr. Ghormley matched coins with G. B. Howe, seaman, second class, and royal yardman of the ship. Howe is from Lowell, Mass., and enlisted on board the Constitution. Immediately after identification of the coins permission was granted by Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer, for Howe to go on liberty with Dr. Ghormley.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver presenting picture of USS Constitution to Mayor Joseph K. Carson

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Portland Mayor Joseph K. Carson holding up a framed picture depicting the frigate USS Constitution in Portland with the St. Johns Bridge in the background. The photograph was taken at Portland City Hall on August 26, 1933. The Constitution visited Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. Gulliver, commanding officer of the Constitution, returned to Portland while the ship was visiting Longview, Washington, to present the picture of the frigate to the city. The picture was created by artist Duncan Gleason of Hollywood, California.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver? and Marine guard aboard USS Constitution

Photograph showing a U. S. Navy officer saluting a Marine guard as they present arms aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph may show the honors marking the return of the Constitution’s commanding officer, Commander Louis J. Gulliver, on August 11, 1933, after a 30-day leave. Gulliver’s return occurred during the Constitution and crew’s three-week visit to Portland as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” Also see image Nos. 371N3713, 371N3718, and 371N3719.

Officers of USS Constitution presenting miniature cannon to Oregon Journal writer Wallace S. Wharton

Photograph showing (from left) Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution; Wallace S. Wharton, a writer for the Oregon Journal; and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer of the Constitution. They are standing in a row aboard the ship, and Gulliver is smiling and holding a tiny wooden cannon. The photograph was taken in August 1933, while the Constitution and crew were in Portland for three weeks as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Wallace S. Wharton (center), staff member of The Journal, receives miniature cannon from old timbers of ship in appreciation of articles written on frigate’s visit. Presentation is made by Commander Gulliver with Lieutenant Commander Hartley looking on approvingly.” Also see image Nos. 371N3717, 371N3724, and 371N3730, which were published with this photograph.

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