cellulose nitrate film

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cellulose nitrate film

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cellulose nitrate film

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cellulose nitrate film

6886 Collections results for cellulose nitrate film

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Wreckage of airplane near East Glisan Street

Photograph of a group of people with the wreckage of an airplane in a field. Some of the people are leaning or sitting on the remains of the plane. The text “Varney Wreck — near E Glisan St” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. “Varney” may refer to Varney Air Lines.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of unidentified people looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a similar photograph, image No. 371N3105, and a story about the crash, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.” Along with the story, the Journal published image No. 371N3105, a different photograph of the wrecked plane.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of two unidentified boys looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.” Along with the story, the Journal published image No. 371N3105, a different photograph of the wrecked plane.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of unidentified people looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a similar photograph, image No. 371N3105, and a story about the crash, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of an unidentified man looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel, was killed. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, May 27, 1931, under the headline “To Death on West Hills Golf Course.” The photograph had the following caption: “Battered wreckage of the light plane in which Roy H. Sheffel [sic], operator of the Rendezvous eating place, made a fatal plunge to the seventh fairway of the West Hills golf course Tuesday afternoon. The picture was taken after the ship had been righted.” The photograph accompanied a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of steamship Laurel near mouth of Columbia River

Aerial photograph of part of the steamship Laurel after it wrecked on a sandbar near the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the steamer, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15, 1929. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A photograph similar to this one was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, June 18, 1929, under the headline "All Hands Off But the Skipper -- And He's Still There." That photograph had the following caption: "In this remarkable air view of the wrecked hulk of the steamship Laurel lying in the breakers off North jetty beach the figure of Captain Louis Johnson shows near the rail as he waved goodbye to The Journal plane which circled over him Monday afternoon. The plane, piloted by Dick Rankin of the Rankin System, Inc., carried Ralph Vincent, Journal staff photographer, who took the picture, and Dick Rummel of The Journal staff." The photograph accompanied two articles about the Laurel shipwreck, one titled "Gale Balks Effort to Rescue Skipper; Seas Pound Laurel," and another titled "Journal Men Get Air View." Image note: The text "S. S. Laurel" is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Wreckage steamship Laurel near mouth of Columbia River

Aerial photograph of the wreckage of the steamship Laurel after it struck Peacock Spit near the North Jetty at the mouth of the Columbia River. According to reporting in the Oregon Journal, the ship, carrying a load of lumber, encountered high seas from a gale as it left the river on Saturday, June 15, 1929. Around 2:30 or 3 a.m. on Sunday, June 16, the ship struck a sandbar and broke in two. One crew member, Russell Smith, died when a wave swept over the ship and he was washed overboard. Rescue boats retrieved the remaining crew members on June 16 and June 17, except for the captain, Louis Johnson, who initially refused to leave. He was rescued on Wednesday, June 19. A photograph similar to this one was published with several others on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on Tuesday, June 18, 1929. The photographs appeared under the headline "Exclusive Photographs of Wrecked Steamer Laurel and Her Crew." Image note: The text “S. S. Laurel” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the photograph.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

Wrecked car next to railroad tracks

Photograph of two unidentified men in uniforms looking at the wreckage of a vehicle lying next to a set of railroad tracks. On the left side of the image is a railroad crossing sign. The photograph was taken at night. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Wrestler

Portrait of an unidentified man standing on what may be a rooftop or balcony. He is shirtless and is wearing a wrestling belt, wrestling shorts, and leggings.

Wrestler

Portrait of an unidentified shirtless man standing on what may be a rooftop or balcony. He is smiling and is wearing a wrestling belt and shorts.

Wrestling team?

Group portrait of eleven unidentified men, possibly a wrestling team, posing in two rows. They are wearing shorts and are shirtless. Also see image No. 371N4974 and 371N4975.

YMCA junior lifeguards, full-length portrait

Full-length portrait of eight unidentified YMCA junior lifeguards and two unidentified men. They are in two rows outside the doors of a building. The men are wearing suits; the boys are wearing swimming suits with a life-ring emblem and the words “JUNIOR LIFE SAVER / Y. M. C. A.” on the front.

Yahrzeit lamp

Photograph of a yahrzeit lamp on a table. The lamp probably belonged to the family of Julius L. Meier, who served as governor of Oregon from 1931 to 1935. A yahrzeit lamp is part of the Jewish observance of the anniversary of a loved one’s death. Each year, the lamp is lit in commemoration on the day of the anniversary. Inscriptions are partially visible on the doors of the lamp. Visible at the top of the left door is the text “IN MEMORY OF FATHER AARON MEIER,” “AGE 58” and “YURZEIT.” Visible at the top of the right door is the text “In MEMORY OF MOTHER JEANNETTE MEIER,” “AGE 82” and “YURZEIT.” Also see image No. 371N4255. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Yahrzeit lamp

Photograph of a yahrzeit lamp on a table. The lamp probably belonged to the family of Julius L. Meier, who served as governor of Oregon from 1931 to 1935. A yahrzeit lamp is part of the Jewish observance of the anniversary of a loved one’s death. Each year, the lamp is lit in commemoration on the day of the anniversary. Also see image No. 371N4255. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Young actors? in French-themed costumes

Portrait of four unidentified young people, probably actors in a play or musical, posing in French-themed costumes. The performers on the left and right are bowing to each other; the two in the center are raising clasped hands. Two of the performers are wearing dresses and two are wearing matching jackets and knickers. All four are wearing wigs. Image note: Light leak on negative.

Young ballet dancer in costume, posing en pointe

Portrait of an unidentified girl wearing a ballet costume and slippers, posing in front of a wall. She is crouching en pointe on one leg and is holding her other leg extended upward in front of her. The number 6 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower left corner of the image.

Young boy feeding goat

Photograph of an unidentified boy feeding a goat in a stall, possibly at a fair or livestock show. The boy is standing in the aisle next to a row of stalls. In the background, more children are leaning on a fence along the row of stalls and are watching the boy feed the goat.

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