cellulose nitrate film

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Memorial service at Multnomah Stadium, Portland, honoring people killed in World War I

Photograph showing a memorial service honoring Canadians and Americans killed in World War I. The service was held at Multnomah Stadium in Portland on Wednesday, June 13, 1934. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 18 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, June 13, 1934, under the headline “Dedicators of Cenotaph Pay Honor to Comrades in Death.” The photographs had the following caption: “At Multnomah stadium Wednesday veterans and high civic officials of Canada and the United States joined to unveil a cenotaph memorial for war dead of both nations as symbolic of lasting friendship between the two countries. The dedication climaxed the Canadian Legion convention held here this week.” This photograph had the following additional caption information: “Just before flags of the United States, Great Britain, and Canada were raised on the towering flag pole.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Veterans Pay High Tribute to War Dead.” According to the story, the cenotaph unveiled at the service bore the following inscription: “In grateful tribute to the men and women of Canada and the United States who gave their lives in the World war. May their heroic sacrifice insure lasting peace among the nations. Dedicated at the Canadian Legion convention, June 13, 1934.” Also see image No. 371N3002, which may also have been taken at the memorial service.

Unidentified man laying wreath at cenotaph during memorial service? at Multnomah Stadium, Portland

Photograph showing an unidentified man laying a wreath at a cenotaph, located at Multnomah Stadium in Portland, honoring Americans and Canadians killed in World War I. The photograph was probably taken on Wednesday, June 13, 1934, during a memorial service at which the cenotaph was unveiled. The service was part of a Canadian Legion convention held in Portland. A story about the service, headlined “Veterans Pay High Tribute to War Dead” and image No. 371N3001 were published on Page 18 of the Oregon Journal on Thursday, June 14, 1934.

Crowd at groundbreaking ceremony for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing the crowd at a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. A story about the ceremony was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Cyril G. Manning, who was wounded in World War I, had performed the groundbreaking. The story also reported that the land “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3013, 371N3014, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

Cyril G. Manning breaking ground for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing veteran Cyril G. Manning digging a shovelful of earth during a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. A story about the ceremony was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3012, 371N3014, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

Cyril G. Manning breaking ground for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing veteran Cyril G. Manning digging a shovelful of earth during a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. A band is playing in the background. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Break Ground for Veterans’ Hospital.” This photograph had the following caption: “Cyril G. Manning, disabled World war veteran, digs first shovelful of earth.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3014, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

Groundbreaking ceremony for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing the crowd at a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. At center right is veteran Cyril G. Manning, who performed the groundbreaking. At center left is an unidentified man holding a shovel. A story about the ceremony was published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3015, and 371N3016.

Philip L. Jackson giving address at groundbreaking ceremony for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing Philip L. Jackson delivering an address to the crowd at a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Break Ground for Veterans’ Hospital.” This photograph had the following caption: “Marshall N. Dana, associate editor of The Journal, who was chairman, and Philip L. Jackson, publisher of the Journal, reading his address covering the history of the gift of the site by his father, the late C. S. Jackson, founder of The Journal.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that the groundbreaking had been performed by veteran Cyril G. Manning, whose hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3014, and 371N3016.

Mrs. V. A. Manning and son Cyril G. Manning at groundbreaking ceremony for veterans hospital on Marquam Hill, Portland

Photograph, taken on Tuesday, February 7, 1928, showing Mrs. V. A. Manning and her son, veteran Cyril G. Manning, at a groundbreaking ceremony for a new veterans hospital on Marquam Hill in Portland. Cyril Manning, who performed the groundbreaking, has one arm around his mother’s shoulders and is holding the handle of the shovel in his other hand. A cropped version of this photograph was one of three that were published on Page 6 of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, February 8, 1928, under the headline “Break Ground for Veterans’ Hospital.” This photograph had the following caption: “Manning and his mother, Mrs. V. A. Manning, watching ceremonies incident to ground breaking.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Disabled Veteran Turns First Earth on Site of Jackson Park Hospital.” The story reported that Manning’s hip had been shattered by gunfire during World War I, and that his older brother had been killed in the war. The story also reported that the land for the hospital “was donated to the state of Oregon for the University of Oregon medical school by Mrs. C. S. Jackson and Philip L. Jackson as a memorial to the late publisher of The Journal. From the area, 25 acres were donated to the government by the regents of the medical school.” See related image Nos. 371N3011, 371N3012, 371N3013, 371N3014, and 371N3015.

USS Constitution under way on Columbia River off Wauna, Oregon, en route to Portland

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution sailing on the Columbia River near Wauna, Oregon, en route to Portland on Wednesday, August 2, 1933. That day, a similar photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal under the headline “The Ship That Was a Navy When the Nation Was Young.” That photograph had the following caption: “The United States frigate Constitution in the Columbia River off Wauna on her way to Portland for a 20-day visit. The picture was taken Wednesday from the air by Ralph Vincent, Journal staff photographer, who flew to meet the veteran of the wars with the Barbary coast pirates and of 1812, in an airplane of Rasmussen-Meadows, Inc. The U. S. S. Grebe, mine sweeper, is towing the gallant old craft, while the river towboat Shaver acts as an auxiliary. Puget island is in the background [at upper left]. The ship was under the brow of scenic Clatsop Crest on the lower Columbia River highway when the picture was taken.” The photograph accompanied a story headlined “Old Frigate Nears Berth In Portland.” Also see image Nos. 371N3703 and 371N3708.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

USS Constitution, tugboat Shaver, and USS Grebe under way on Columbia River near Puget Island, Washington

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution (center), towed by the USS Grebe and accompanied by the tugboat Shaver, on the Columbia River near Puget Island, Washington, on Wednesday, August 2, 1933. The frigate and crew were en route to Portland for a three-week visit, from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. Also see image Nos. 371N3702 and 371N3708.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

USS Constitution under way on Columbia River?

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution under way, probably on the Columbia River en route to Portland on Wednesday, August 2, 1933. The ship and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. A tugboat sailing alongside the Constitution is partially visible at the rear of the ship.

USS Constitution and tugboat off Swan Island, Portland

Photograph, taken from shore, showing the frigate USS constitution and an accompanying tugboat under way on the Willamette River in Portland in August 1933. A small group of spectators are watching from the beach. In the background is Swan Island, where the frigate was moored while the ship and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933. The visit was part of a national tour.

USS Constitution under way on Willamette River, leaving Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and an accompanying tugboat on the Willamette River off Waud Bluff as the ship departs Portland on Tuesday, August 22, 1933. The frigate and crew visited Portland as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3716 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal the day the ship departed. The photographs were published under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “The Constitution as she appeared below Columbia university on the way down river shortly after 6 a.m. Tuesday after a 21-day stay here.” Columbia University is now the University of Portland.

USS Constitution and tugboat sailing under St. Johns Bridge

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution and a Shaver Transportation Company tugboat sailing under the St. Johns Bridge in Portland in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 22, 1933, when the frigate departed for Kalama after a visit to Portland as part of a national tour. At far right is the USS Grebe, which accompanied and towed the Constitution on the tour. A story, headlined “Old Frigate Leaves After 21-Day Stay” and two related images, Nos. 371N3705 and 371N3716, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 22, 1933. See related image No. 371N5539.

USS Constitution and tugboat under way on Columbia River?

Photograph, taken from a high angle, showing the frigate USS Constitution and an accompanying tugboat under way in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited Portland for three weeks as part of a national tour. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, when the frigate was sailing on the Columbia River en route to Portland.

USS Constitution and USS Grebe arriving in Portland?

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution (left) and its companion ship, the USS Grebe (right) sailing on the Willamette River between Waud Bluff (background, right) and Swan Island in Portland in August 1933, when the ships and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. The photograph may have been taken on August 2, 1933, the day they arrived.

USS Constitution and USS Grebe under way on Columbia River near Wauna, Oregon?

Aerial photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution (left) being towed by its companion ship, the USS Grebe, in August 1933. The photograph was probably taken on August 2, 1933, while the ships were sailing on the Columbia River off Wauna, Oregon, and Puget Island, Washington, en route to Portland. The Constitution and its crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. Also see image Nos. 371N3702 and 371N3703.

Vincent, Ralph (Photographer)

USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland

Photograph showing the frigate USS Constitution moored at Swan Island, Portland, in August 1933, when the ship and crew visited for three weeks as part of a national tour. A crowd is partially visible in the foreground. This photograph may have been taken on Friday, August 18, 1933, when a large crowd of spectators watched sailors set the sails on the frigate’s mizzenmast. See image No. 371N3712.

Sailors climbing into position on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing sailors on the USS Constitution climbing ladders toward a platform on the mizzenmast in August 1933. The photograph was taken while the frigate and crew were in Portland from August 2 to August 22, 1933, as part of a national tour. The photograph may have been taken on August 18, 1933, when sailors on the Constitution set sails on the mizzenmast. A similar photograph was published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on August 19, 1933, along with image No. 371N3711 and a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Crowd watching crew members set sails on USS Constitution’s mizzenmast

Photograph showing a crowd of spectators watching crew members set sails on the mizzenmast of the USS Constitution on Friday, August 18, 1933. The ship was moored on Swan Island, Portland, during a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of two that were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, August 19, 1933, under the headline “Constitution Preens Wings.” This photograph had the following caption: “While thousands of Portlanders looked on from the airport and the hill sides, sailors on ‘Old Ironsides’ set sails on the mizzenmast of the old warrior late Friday. Top picture shows the sails unfurled.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Landlubbers See Frigate Unfurl Sails.”

Commander Louis J. Gulliver and son looking at cannon aboard USS Constitution in Portland

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (right) and his son, Louis J. Gulliver Jr., a midshipman third class, looking at a cannon aboard the frigate USS Constitution. The photograph was taken in Portland on August 11, 1933, after Commander Gulliver returned from a 30-day leave and resumed command of the frigate. The ship and crew were in Portland on a three-week visit as part of a national tour. Gulliver’s wife, son, and three daughters accompanied him to Portland. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3719 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Gulliver showing a 1933 model midshipman, his son, Louis J. Jr., what a midshipman of 1812 should know about ordnance.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver waving farewell from USS Constitution

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver, commanding officer of the frigate USS Constitution, waving from the top of the gangplank before the ship’s departure from Portland on August 22, 1933, after a three-week visit as part of a national tour. That day, a cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3705 were published on Page 9 of the Oregon Journal under the headline “Ending Triumphant Call of Grand Old Frigate.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver of the frigate waves farewell to an appreciative and grateful city.” Image note: Light leak on negative.

USS Constitution officers Lieutenant. H. St Johns Butler, Commander Louis J. Gulliver, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley

Three-quarters portrait of three U. S. Navy officers standing in a row and facing front. The photograph was taken in Portland in May 1933. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 10 of the Oregon Journal on May 12, 1933, under the headline “Getting Ready for ‘Old Ironsides.’ ” The photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, center, commanding officer of the gallant old frigate Constitution, inspecting the Swan Island moorage to be occupied by the ship on her arrival here August 2. With the commander are Lieutenant H. St. Johns Butler, navigating officer, left, and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer. The photograph accompanied a story headlined “ ‘Old Ironsides’ Chief Praises Moorage Here.” See related image No. 371N3720.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (second from left), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley (right) and unidentified sailors saluting as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after returning from a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken aboard the Constitution on August 11, 1933, while the ship and crew were in Portland for a three-week visit as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph and image No. 371N3713 were published on Page 4 of the August 11, 1933, under the headline “Piping the Skipper Over The Side.” This photograph had the following caption: “Commander Louis J. Gulliver, left, stepping onto the decks of ‘Old Ironsides,’ with side-boys at salute, and welcomed by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Hartley, who had command of the frigate during Gulliver’s absence on leave. Hartley relinquished command and resumed his duties as executive officer.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Old Ironsides.” The story described the honors for Gulliver as follows: “The side honors accorded the captain consisted of mustering the marine guard, which presented arms as he came across the gangway between the line of four side-boys, who stood at salute while the chief boatswain’s mate blew a rail on his pipe. Lieutenant David W. Tolson, officer of the deck, gave the formal salute as the captain stepped on the deck.” See additional related image No. 371N3718. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the honors marking Gulliver’s return.

Commander Louis J. Gulliver returning to USS Constitution after leave

Photograph showing Commander Louis J. Gulliver (left) and Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley shaking hands as Gulliver resumes command of the frigate USS Constitution after a 30-day leave. The photograph was taken on August 11, 1933, during a three-week visit to Portland by the Constitution and crew as part of a national tour. A story about Gulliver’s return, headlined “Gulliver Back As Boss Over Ironsides” was published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on August 11, 1933. See related image Nos. 371N3713 and 371N3719. Image No. 371N3735 may also depict part of the brief ceremonies marking Gulliver’s return.

Officers aboard USS Constitution during visit to Portland

Full-length portrait of seven officers standing in row and facing front aboard the frigate USS Constitution in August 1933 during a three-week visit by the ship and crew as part of a national tour. A cropped version of this photograph was one of four that were published on Page 4 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, August 20, 1933, under the headline “No Dull Moments on Deck of Old Frigate Constitution.” This photograph had the following caption: “Officers of the ship (reading from left), Lieutenant David W. Tolson, Lieutenant W. J. Dean (supply corps), Lieutenant Commander Henry Hartley, executive officer; Commander Louis J. Gulliver, captain; Lieutenant Joseph C. Van Cleve, Lieutenant J. Y. Dannenberg and Lieutenant D. W. Lyon (medical corps).” Also see image Nos. 371N3724, 371N3730, and 371N3736, which were published with this photograph.

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