Artists--Oregon

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Artists--Oregon

30 Collections results for Artists--Oregon

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Oral history interview with Agnes Barchus

  • SR 9407
  • Collection
  • 1980-03-03

This oral history interview with Agnes Barchus was conducted by Karen A. Reyes at Barchus' home in Portland, Oregon, on March 3, 1980. In this interview, Barchus discusses the art career of her mother, Eliza R. Barchus, including her exhibits at the Portland Hotel and the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, as well as her innovation of selling prints of her paintings on postcards. Barchus also shares her memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, describing many of the buildings and exhibits in detail. She describes some of the houses that her mother built in Portland, her mother's practice of paying her bills in trade, and her mother's efforts to save several boxwood trees from a construction project. She talks about the renewed interest in her mother's artwork after Eliza Barchus' death in 1959, exhibitions of her mother's work in the 1960s and 1970s, and the passage of a resolution naming Eliza Barchus "The Oregon Artist."

Barchus, Agnes, 1893-1983

Oral history interview with Agnes Barchus [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Agnes Barchus was conducted by Karen A. Reyes at Barchus' home in Portland, Oregon, on March 3, 1980. In this interview, Barchus discusses the art career of her mother, Eliza R. Barchus, including her exhibits at the Portland Hotel and the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, as well as her innovation of selling prints of her paintings on postcards. Barchus also shares her memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, describing many of the buildings and exhibits in detail. She describes some of the houses that her mother built in Portland, her mother's practice of paying her bills in trade, and her mother's efforts to save several boxwood trees from a construction project. She talks about the renewed interest in her mother's artwork after Eliza Barchus' death in 1959, exhibitions of her mother's work in the 1960s and 1970s, and the passage of a resolution naming Eliza Barchus "The Oregon Artist."

Barchus, Agnes, 1893-1983

Oral history interview with Agnes Barchus [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Agnes Barchus was conducted by Karen A. Reyes at Barchus' home in Portland, Oregon, on March 3, 1980. In this interview, Barchus discusses the art career of her mother, Eliza R. Barchus, including her exhibits at the Portland Hotel and the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland, as well as her innovation of selling prints of her paintings on postcards. Barchus also shares her memories of the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition, describing many of the buildings and exhibits in detail. She describes some of the houses that her mother built in Portland, her mother's practice of paying her bills in trade, and her mother's efforts to save several boxwood trees from a construction project. She talks about the renewed interest in her mother's artwork after Eliza Barchus' death in 1959, exhibitions of her mother's work in the 1960s and 1970s, and the passage of a resolution naming Eliza Barchus "The Oregon Artist."

Barchus, Agnes, 1893-1983

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose

  • SR 1752
  • Collection
  • 1989-04-26 - 1989-04-26

This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session.

In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 1. This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Art Bimrose [Sound Recording 03]

Tape 2, Side 2. This oral history interview with Art Bimrose was conducted by Jim Strassmaier on April 26, 1989. The interview was conducted in conjunction with a 1989 exhibition of Bimrose's work at the Oregon Historical Society. The interview was conducted in one session. In this interview, Bimrose discusses his family background and early life in Spokane, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon, including his early interest in art. He discusses his early career in art, particularly commercial art, during the Depression. He also talks about his summer jobs with the Southern Pacific Railroad during his high school years, the effect the Depression had on his family, and his early political beliefs. He discusses working for the Oregonian newspaper, first as a photo re-toucher and later as a cartoonist. He talks about developing his art style, his process in creating political cartoons, and the editorial policies of the Oregonian. He also briefly talks about his experience in the U.S. Army during World War II, particularly the effect it had on his personality and home life. He also talks about the difficulty in drawing cartoons for the Oregonian that were supportive of the Vietnam War, despite his personal opposition to it. He describes his use of symbolism in his cartoons; talks about politicians he admired; and discusses the Oregonian editorial conferences that he attended. He also talks about some of the controversial topics on which he drew cartoons and working with the Oregonian editorial page editors. He closes the interview by discussing his retirement activities.

Bimrose, Art, 1912-

Oral history interview with Kathy Delumpa Allegri

This oral history interview with Kathy Delumpa Allegri was conducted by Sankar Raman and Briana Ybanez on November 2, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Allegri discusses her father's work as a Philippine Scout for the U.S. Army during World War II; her family's subsequent immigration to the United States from the Philippines in 1949; and her early life on a military base in Georgia, including her family's experiences with racism. She describes moving to Palo Alto, California, in the early 1950s, growing up in a diverse community in the California Bay Area, and her high school experience. She talks about dropping out of college to help her sister raise her family after her sister's husband was killed during the Vietnam War. She discusses her marriage to Bill Allegri and living in Midwest while he completed his education and then taught high school. She describes the racism she experienced in the Midwest; returning to the Bay Area; and working as a freelance artist. She talks about completing her college degree at Colorado State University in 1989. Allegri talks about moving to Oregon in 1991, operating a wine shop with her husband from 2000 to 2014, and being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015. She talks about her art, teaching watercolor classes, and some of her exhibits. She closes the interview by talking about her art collection and how her Filipino heritage influenced her art.

Allegri, Kathy Delumpa

Oral history interview with Kathy Delumpa Allegri [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Kathy Delumpa Allegri was conducted by Sankar Raman and Briana Ybanez on November 2, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Allegri discusses her father's work as a Philippine Scout for the U.S. Army during World War II; her family's subsequent immigration to the United States from the Philippines in 1949; and her early life on a military base in Georgia, including her family's experiences with racism. She describes moving to Palo Alto, California, in the early 1950s, growing up in a diverse community in the California Bay Area, and her high school experience. She talks about dropping out of college to help her sister raise her family after her sister's husband was killed during the Vietnam War. She discusses her marriage to Bill Allegri and living in Midwest while he completed his education and then taught high school. She describes the racism she experienced in the Midwest; returning to the Bay Area; and working as a freelance artist. She talks about completing her college degree at Colorado State University in 1989. Allegri talks about moving to Oregon in 1991, operating a wine shop with her husband from 2000 to 2014, and being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015. She talks about her art, teaching watercolor classes, and some of her exhibits. She closes the interview by talking about her art collection and how her Filipino heritage influenced her art.

Allegri, Kathy Delumpa

Oral history interview with Sabina Haque [Sound Recording 02]

Session 1, Part 2. This oral history interview with Sabina Haque was conducted by Sankar Raman on November 11, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the second part of this interview, Haque discusses leaving Pakistan to attend Smith College in Massachusetts and adjusting to life in the United States. She then talks about going on to study art at Boston University and the disapproval of her parents. She also talks about her marriage.

Haque, Sabina Zeba, 1974-

Oral history interview with Sabina Haque

This oral history interview with Sabina Haque was conducted by Sankar Raman on November 11, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Haque discusses her family background and early life in Karachi, Pakistan, including living under the U.S-backed dictatorship of President Zia-ul-Haq; being raised as a secular Muslim; and her education. She also talks about the changes in Pakistan during her lifetime, particularly in regard to women's rights. Haque discusses leaving Pakistan to attend Smith College in Massachusetts and adjusting to life in the United States. She then talks about going on to study art at Boston University and the disapproval of her parents. She also talks about her marriage. Haque discusses her art and how her cultural and ethnic identities inform her work. She talks about her experience as a Pakistani with white American heritage and the uncertainty her family has felt in the political climate of President Donald Trump's administration. She closes the interview by discussing maintaining relationships with racist family members, the importance of art in bridging political divides, and her hopes for a more diverse Portland City Council.

Haque, Sabina Zeba, 1974-

Oral history interview with Sabina Haque [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1, Part 1. This oral history interview with Sabina Haque was conducted by Sankar Raman on November 11, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the first part of this interview, Haque discusses her family background and early life in Karachi, Pakistan, including living under the U.S-backed dictatorship of President Zia-ul-Haq; being raised as a secular Muslim, and her education. She also talks about the changes in Pakistan during her lifetime, particularly in regard to women’s rights.

Haque, Sabina Zeba, 1974-

Oral history interview with Farooq Hassan

This oral history interview with Farooq Hassan was conducted by Sankar Raman on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Hassan discusses his early life in Basra, Iraq, including the history and culture of Iraq before 1958, and his early art education. He then talks about studying art at universities in Baghdad, Iraq, and Rome, Italy. He discusses returning to Iraq in 1980 and his experience during the Iran-Iraq War. He describes some of the atrocities of Saddam Hussein and how he managed to evade the militias. He also talks about his marriage to fellow artist Haifa Al Habeeb. Hassan discusses his artwork, including his influences and methods, and his career after the end of the Iran-Iraq War. He also talks about designing stamps for the Iraqi government and giving some of his works to the Iraq Museum. He describes his life after the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Hassan and Raman discuss an exhibition of Hassan's artwork planned for later in 2018. Hassan talks about his reasons for immigrating to the United States in 2010, and discusses his daughter and her family. Hassan talks about the materials he uses in his painting and drawing, the development of his art technique, and the loss of several of his paintings during the looting of the Iraq Museum in 2003. Hassan and Sankar look at some of Hassan's artworks and discuss them. Hassan closes the interview by talking about his career as an artist in the Pacific Northwest.

Hassan, Farooq, 1939-

Oral history interview with Sabina Haque [Sound Recording 03]

Session 1, Part 3. This oral history interview with Sabina Haque was conducted by Sankar Raman on November 11, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the third part of this interview, Haque discusses her art and how her cultural and ethnic identities inform her work. She talks about her experience as a Pakistani with white American heritage and the uncertainty her family has felt during the political climate of President Donald Trump’s administration.

Haque, Sabina Zeba, 1974-

Oral history interview with Sabina Haque [Sound Recording 04]

Session 1, Part 4. This oral history interview with Sabina Haque was conducted by Sankar Raman on November 11, 2017. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the fourth and final part of this interview, Haque closes the interview by discussing maintaining relationships with racist family members, the importance of art in bridging political divides, and her hopes for a more diverse Portland City Council.

Haque, Sabina Zeba, 1974-

Oral history interview with Farooq Hassan [Sound Recording 01]

This oral history interview with Farooq Hassan was conducted by Sankar Raman on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the first session of this interview, Hassan discusses his early life in Basra, Iraq, including the history and culture of Iraq before 1958, and his early art education. He then talks about studying art at universities in Baghdad, Iraq, and Rome, Italy. He discusses returning to Iraq in 1980 and his experience during the Iran-Iraq War. He describes some of the atrocities of Saddam Hussein and how he managed to evade the militias. He also talks about his marriage to fellow artist Haifa Al Habeeb. Hassan discusses his artwork, including his influences and methods, and his career after the end of the Iran-Iraq War. He also talks about designing stamps for the Iraqi government and giving some of his works to the Iraq Museum. He describes his life after the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Hassan and Sankar discuss an exhibition of Hassan’s artwork planned for later in 2018. Hassan talks about his reasons for immigrating to the United States in 2010, and discusses his daughter and her family.

Hassan, Farooq, 1939-

Oral history interview with Farooq Hassan [Sound Recording 02]

This oral history interview with Farooq Hassan was conducted by Sankar Raman on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the first part of the second session of this interview, Hassan talks about the materials he uses in his painting and drawing, the development of his art technique, and the loss of several of his paintings during the looting of the Iraq Museum in 2003. Hassan and Sankar look at some of Hassan’s artworks and discuss them.

Hassan, Farooq, 1939-

Oral history interview with Farooq Hassan [Sound Recording 03]

This oral history interview with Farooq Hassan was conducted by Sankar Raman on August 10, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In the second part of the second session of this interview, Hassan closes the interview by talking about his career as an artist in the Pacific Northwest.

Hassan, Farooq, 1939-

Oral history interview with Zsuzsanna Vamos [Sound Recording 01]

Session 1. This oral history interview with Zsuszanna Vamos was conducted by Sankar and Briana Ybanez on August 20, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Vamos discusses her family background and early life in Budapest, Hungary, including conditions under the Communist government, her education, and listening to American radio as a teenager. She talks about her interest in chemistry and her admiration for Marie Curie, as well as her experiences attending Semmelweis University to study pharmacology. She discusses her marriage to Istvan Adany and his career, and she talks about her career in biomedical research and frustration at her inability to do the research she wanted. She then talks about applying for jobs in other countries, which led to a job offer from Kansas University Medical Center. She describes the process of immigrating to the United States and adjusting to life afterward. She talks about her children, their careers, and their families. She discusses getting her green card in 1997, Istvan Adany's career in the U.S., and their move to Hillsboro, Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her work as an artist, her thoughts on the American Dream, and her reaction to the treatment of refugees at the time of the interview in 2018.

Vamos, Zsuzsanna, 1953-

Oral history interview with Zsuzsanna Vamos

This oral history interview with Zsuszanna Vamos was conducted by Sankar and Briana Ybanez on August 20, 2018. The interview was recorded for The Immigrant Story, an organization that documents and archives the stories of immigrants and refugees in the United States. In this interview, Vamos discusses her family background and early life in Budapest, Hungary, including conditions under the Communist government, her education, and listening to American radio as a teenager. She talks about her interest in chemistry and her admiration for Marie Curie, as well as her experiences attending Semmelweis University to study pharmacology. She discusses her marriage to Istvan Adany and his career, and she talks about her career in biomedical research and frustration at her inability to do the research she wanted. She then talks about applying for jobs in other countries, which led to a job offer from Kansas University Medical Center. She describes the process of immigrating to the United States and adjusting to life afterward. She talks about her children, their careers, and their families. She discusses getting her green card in 1997, Istvan Adany's career in the U.S., and their move to Hillsboro, Oregon. She closes the interview by talking about her work as an artist, her thoughts on the American Dream, and her reaction to the treatment of refugees at the time of the interview in 2018.

Vamos, Zsuzsanna, 1953-

Oral history interview with Thayne J. Logan

  • SR 471
  • Collection
  • 1990-01-03

This oral history interview with Thayne J. Logan was conducted by Linda S. Dodds and Richard E. Ritz at Logan's home in Portland, Oregon, on January 3, 1990. Helen S. Logan was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview.

In this interview, Logan discusses his family background and early life in Joplin, Missouri, and in Portland, including his education at Benson High School and his early interest in architecture. He then talks about working for Northwest Steel as a draftsman during World War I. He discusses his early career as an architectural illustrator in Idaho and Oregon, including architects he worked with, particularly Carl L. Linde, and buildings he helped design.

Logan, Thayne J. (Thayne Johnstone), 1900-1991

Oral history interview with Thayne J. Logan [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Thayne J. Logan was conducted by Linda S. Dodds and Richard E. Ritz at Logan's home in Portland, Oregon, on January 3, 1990. Helen S. Logan was also present and occasionally contributed to the interview. In this interview, Logan discusses his family background and early life in Joplin, Missouri, and in Portland, including his education at Benson High School and his early interest in architecture. He then talks about working for Northwest Steel as a draftsman during World War I. He discusses his early career as an architectural illustrator in Idaho and Oregon, including architects he worked with, particularly Carl L. Linde, and buildings he helped design.

Logan, Thayne J. (Thayne Johnstone), 1900-1991

Oral history interview with Lee Kelly

This oral history interview with Lee Kelly was conducted by Marian W. Kolisch at Kelly's home in Oregon City, Oregon, on August 18, 1987. The interview was part of a series conducted by Oregon photographer Marian W. Kolisch to accompany portraits of Oregon artists, businesspeople, and politicians.

In the interview, Kelly briefly discusses his early life in McCall, Idaho, and his experience in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. He talks about studying art at Vanport College, which later became Portland State University, and at the Museum School, which later became the Pacific Northwest College of Art. He discusses his art and sculpture, including working with metal and his East Asian influences. He talks about the history of using paint in sculpture, his creative process, and creating art for commissions. He closes the interview by discussing the challenges in making a living as an artist.

Kelly, Lee, 1932-

Oral history interview with Lee Kelly [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Lee Kelly was conducted by Marian W. Kolisch at Kelly's home in Oregon City, Oregon, on August 18, 1987. The interview was part of a series conducted by Oregon photographer Marian W. Kolisch to accompany portraits of Oregon artists, businesspeople, and politicians. In the interview, Kelly briefly discusses his early life in McCall, Idaho, and his experience in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. He talks about studying art at Vanport College, which later became Portland State University, and at the Museum School, which later became the Pacific Northwest College of Art. He discusses his art and sculpture, including working with metal and his East Asian influences. He talks about the history of using paint in sculpture, his creative process, and creating art for commissions. He closes the interview by discussing the challenges in making a living as an artist.

Kelly, Lee, 1932-

Oral history interview with Lee Kelly [Sound Recording 02]

Tape 1, Side 2. This oral history interview with Lee Kelly was conducted by Marian W. Kolisch at Kelly's home in Oregon City, Oregon, on August 18, 1987. The interview was part of a series conducted by Oregon photographer Marian W. Kolisch to accompany portraits of Oregon artists, businesspeople, and politicians. In the interview, Kelly briefly discusses his early life in McCall, Idaho, and his experience in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. He talks about studying art at Vanport College, which later became Portland State University, and at the Museum School, which later became the Pacific Northwest College of Art. He discusses his art and sculpture, including working with metal and his East Asian influences. He talks about the history of using paint in sculpture, his creative process, and creating art for commissions. He closes the interview by discussing the challenges in making a living as an artist.

Kelly, Lee, 1932-

Oral history interview with Marjorie McDonald [Sound Recording 01]

Tape 1, Side 1. This oral history interview with Marjorie McDonald was conducted by Edna Kovacs in Corvallis, Oregon, on October 21, 1989. Kovacs begins the interview by presenting McDonald with a birthday present and by showing photographs to McDonald. McDonald then discusses her family background and early life in Indiana and Portland, Oregon, including her education. She also discusses her love of fishing. She reads and discusses some of her poetry. She talks about living in London, England, to learn Russian and discusses teaching Russian to high school students in Portland. She speaks about her collage artwork, describes some of her pieces, and talks about her art techniques. Kovacs then talks about some of her students and closes the interview by further discussing her own artwork.

McDonald, Marjorie, 1898-1995

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