Albina (Portland, Or.)

Taxonomy

Code

45.54373, -122.6751 Map of Albina (Portland, Or.)

Scope note(s)

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Albina (Portland, Or.)

Albina (Portland, Or.)

Equivalent terms

Albina (Portland, Or.)

  • UF Portland (Or.). Albina
  • UF Albina Community (Portland, Or.)
  • UF Albina Area (Portland, Or.)

Associated terms

Albina (Portland, Or.)

18 Collections results for Albina (Portland, Or.)

18 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Eyeglass sign

Photograph showing a building with an electric sign in the shape of eyes and glasses. Next to the sign are glass windows with “Jeweler,” “Glasses, and “Optician” on them. Behind the sign is the second story of a wooden building (negative 10 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

North Michigan Avenue and North Killingsworth Street (?)

Photograph showing a street scene at what is likely North Michigan Avenue (sign visible) and North Killingsworth Street, looking east. Numerous shops and buildings line both sides of the street, and pedestrians and cars can be seen throughout the frame. Power lines can also be seen throughout the photograph (negative 12 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Train barn at North Killingsworth Street and North Mississippi Avenue

A brick train and bus barn at North Killingsworth Street and North Mississippi Avenue. Numbers have been placed on the brick facade over bays, many of which hold a train or bus. At the ride side of the frame is a man using a hose to clean a train with a sign for “Broadway” on the front. Train tracks pass the front of the building (negative 13 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Piedmont (?) meat counter

A man wearing an apron stands behind a meat counter, while a woman in a hat and fur stands on the other side. Cuts of meat can be seen behind the counter glass, with other products arranged on the surface. A large scale can be seen near the center of the counter (negative 2 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Killingworth Street

Photograph of North Killingsworth Street, likely near North Kerby Avenue. A bus with a “Killingsworth” sign is on the street, as well as street car tracks. A sign for Jockey Club can be seen on the left side of the street, in addition to cars parked along the sidewalk (negative 4 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Wood pile

A pile of wood near Albina and Killingsworth Streets in Portland. The pieces of wood vary in size, and appear to retain tree bark (negative 9 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Williams Avenue at Russell Street, Albina, Portland

Photograph showing Williams Avenue at Russell Street (now North Williams Avenue and Northeast Russell Street) in Albina, Portland. The photograph shows vehicles and a streetcar on Williams and the buildings bordering the street. In the foreground at left is the Matthieu Drug Company; a sign for J. C. Penney Co. is also visible in the background at left. In the foreground at right is Groves Hardware; a sign for the Berg-McLaren is also visible next door to Groves. Image note: The number 2 is written on the negative and is visible in the lower right corner of the image.

Students in front of Cascade College sign

Students stand in a grassy area, partially blocking an electric sign for Cascade College. A woman near the center of the group of holding an open book while the others look downward (negative 11 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Students outside Jefferson High School

Students gather outside the entrance to Jefferson High School (5210 North Kerby Avenue). Many hold books and are looking towards the camera. Above the doorway is “Jefferson High School” (negative 14 of 14). Original sleeve title: Portland communities - Albina and Killingsworth Streets.

Monner, Al (Alfred Anthony), 1909-1998

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd

This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 02]

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Transcript]

Transcript. This oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd was conducted by Greta Smith Wisnewski from August 14 to October 26, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the interview was conducted using Zoom, a video conferencing software. Shepherd was nominated by Oregonians to be interviewed as part of a program by the Oregon Historical Society Research Library to enhance and expand the range of voices in the library's collections. Interviewees are selected from the pool of nominees by a staff committee appointed by the historical society's executive director. The interview was conducted in five sessions.

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

In the second interview session, conducted on September 11, 2020, Shepherd speaks further about her family background, focusing on her paternal family. She revisits the topic of her early life in the Eliot neighborhood, and talks about her Catholic upbringing and involvement with the Immaculate Heart Catholic Church. She discusses how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as changes in the way white people treated them. She then continues to discuss living in Vanport as a teenager during World War II, including her social life, recreational activities, and segregation. She also talks about her early education and about jobs she worked after dropping out. She shares her experiences during the 1948 flood, including living in Guild's Lake for a short time afterward.

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 03]

In the third interview session, conducted on September 25, 2020, Shepherd discusses her marriage to Theodore Cassidy Powell. She then talks about living in the Albina neighborhood in the early 1950s. She also revisits the topic of how the Black community changed after World War II, as well as how the way white people treated them changed. She talks about working as a janitor at KGW, and about her brief marriage to Curley Massey. She speaks about her marriage to Emmett Edwin Shepherd, about buying a house in the Eliot neighborhood, and about the changes in the neighborhood since the 1960s. She talks about raising a family, about her career in housekeeping and janitorial services, and about her experiences during the civil rights movement, including meeting Coretta Scott King. She shares her thoughts about police treatment of Black residents, talks about the mass displacement of Black residents during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, and discusses the Black community in the Albina area of Portland.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 01]

In the first interview session, conducted on August 14, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about her family background, particularly focusing on the life of her maternal grandmother, Edith Goodell Lee. She discusses her early life in the Eliot neighborhood of Portland, Oregon, and talks about businesses in the area. She then briefly talks about living in Vanport during World War II. She discusses her research into her family history.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 04]

In the fourth interview session, conducted on October 9, 2020, Shepherd discusses her experiences picking hops in the 1930s. She shares a childhood drawing she created of a tavern on Union Avenue, as well as a photograph. She talks about the people who lived in the Eliot neighborhood, and discusses her children, their families, and their careers. She revisits the topic of her experiences during the civil rights movement, and the topic of the mass displacement of Black people during the construction of I-5 in the 1960s, as well as during the expansion of Emanuel Hospital in the 1970s. She speaks at length about her involvement with Albina Fair Share and about working to reduce the amount of abandoned houses in the neighborhood. She talks about her involvement with Immaculate Heart Catholic Church.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Oral history interview with Ida Mae Shepherd [Session 05]

In the fifth and final interview session, conducted on October 26, 2020, Shepherd speaks at length about how the Albina area of Portland, particularly the Eliot neighborhood, changed over her life. She also shares her reasons for living nearly her entire life in the area. She discusses how the ways that white and Black Portlanders interact have changed over her life. She talks about the death of her husband, Emmett E. Shepherd, about her volunteer work since her retirement in the late 1980s, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected her activities. She discusses the political situation at the time of the interview in 2020, including protests in Portland and the presidential election. She closes the interview by talking about her recent stroke and recovery.

Shepherd, Ida Mae, 1929-

Map of Portland, Or., 1886

A city map of Portland showing Portland, East Portland, and Albina. The map shows city boundaries, wharves, fire limits, railroads, street railways, and vacated streets.

Marye, W. B.