Airplanes

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Airplanes

246 Collections results for Airplanes

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Mrs. D. W. Barnes with two men on day of her first airplane flight

Photograph of a woman, Mrs. D. W. Barnes, and two men standing in front of a Ryan monoplane with “C-2071” on the tail. Barnes celebrated her 90th birthday by taking her first airplane ride. Her son, E. L. Barnes (possibly the man on the right), accompanied her on the flight, and the plane was flown by pilot Gordon Mounce (center). The Oregon Journal published a short story about Mrs. Barnes’ flight on Page 12 of the June 27, 1928 edition, under the headline, “Mrs. D. W. Barnes Goes Skylarking.” The story was accompanied by a different photo of Mrs. Barnes on the day of the flight, image No. 371N5892. Image note: “Mrs D W Barnes” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, team of Plane 23, Ford National Reliability Air Tour

Portrait of three men, Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, in front of an airplane. They were the team of Plane 23, a Lockheed monoplane, on the 1928 Ford National Reliability Air Tour. The tour reached Portland on July 16, 1928, and the Plane 23 team was the first to arrive at the Swan Island airport. Schoenhair was the pilot and Cooper was the mechanic. The text “Cooper — Shoenhair [sic] — Ray Acre” and the number 8 are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Captain John M. Stanley in plane after return to Pearson Field

Photograph of two aviators in a plane outside a hangar at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday, January 7, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, January 8, 1927, under the headline “Here’s Kelly — If Anyone Asks.” The photograph had the following caption: “After losing and finding themselves again while looking for Leslie Brownlee, lost on Mount Hood, Lieutenant Oakley Kelly and Captain John Stanley returned Friday to Vancouver barracks. They were greeted by Motorcycle Patrolmen Regan and Tauscher, who joined in the search for them. Kelly is shown in the front seat of the plane, Stanley behind.” According to an accompanying story, headlined “Kelly Tells of Harrowing Trip; Never Such Fog,” Stanley and Kelly had left on Wednesday, January 5, to conduct an aerial search of Mount Hood for Brownlee, but were caught in a storm and dense fog. They were forced to fly east and land in a field about five miles from Long Creek, in Grant County. According to the story, they spent the night in the field with the plane and walked to get help and fuel the next morning. On their return flight, they were delayed by another storm and spent the night of Thursday, January 6, in Pendleton before continuing to Vancouver on January 7. See related image No. 371N5908. Image note: The text “Kelly + Stanley” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Judge Hall S. Lusk in front of airplane

Half-length portrait of Judge Hall S. Lusk standing in front of an airplane in a field and facing front. He is wearing a suit and tie. The text “Judge Lusk” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. See related image No. 371N1587.

Tex Rankin, Judge Hall S. Lusk, and three unidentified men in front of airplane

Full-length portrait of five men standing in a row in front of an airplane in a field. The text “Judge Lusk + party” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. The man at left is pilot Tex Rankin; Judge Hall S. Lusk is the second man from left. The other three men are unidentified. See related image No. 371N1585.

Crashed plane nose-down in river

Photograph of an unidentified man standing in a river next to a crashed plane that is nose-down in the water and has a damaged wing. On the side of the plane are the words “Columbia Gorge Air.” The text “6 —” is written on the negative and is visible in the upper right corner of the image.

Pangborn and Herndon’s plane after landing near Wenatchee, Washington

Photograph of an airplane with a bent propeller lying on the ground. The text “Herndon-Pangborn” is painted on the side of the plane just below the cockpit. The photograph was taken after aviators Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon Jr. completed the first non-stop flight across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States on October 5, 1931. They won a $25,000 prize offered by the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun. Pangborn and Herndon landed their plane, Miss Veedol, on its belly at the airfield in Wenatchee, Washington, without landing gear. They had dumped the landing gear shortly after takeoff to reduce weight.

Pangborn and Herndon’s plane after landing near Wenatchee, Washington

Photograph of unidentified people gathered near an airplane lying on the ground, leaning on one wing. The name “Miss Veedol” is painted on the side of the plane. The photograph was taken after aviators Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon Jr. completed the first non-stop flight across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States on October 5, 1931. They won a $25,000 prize offered by the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun. Pangborn and Herndon landed the Miss Veedol on its belly at the airfield in Wenatchee, Washington, without landing gear. They had dumped the landing gear shortly after takeoff to reduce weight.

Pangborn and Herndon’s plane after landing near Wenatchee, Washington

Photograph of unidentified people gathered near an airplane lying on the ground, leaning on one wing. The name “Miss Veedol” is painted on the side of the plane. The photograph was taken after aviators Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon Jr. completed the first non-stop flight across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to the United States on October 5, 1931. They won a $25,000 prize offered by the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun. Pangborn and Herndon landed the Miss Veedol on its belly at the airfield in Wenatchee, Washington, without landing gear. They had dumped the landing gear shortly after takeoff to reduce weight.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.” Along with the story, the Journal published image No. 371N3105, a different photograph of the wrecked plane.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of two unidentified boys looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.” Along with the story, the Journal published image No. 371N3105, a different photograph of the wrecked plane.

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of unidentified people looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a similar photograph, image No. 371N3105, and a story about the crash, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of unidentified people looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel of Portland, was killed. Scheffel ran a cafe called The Rendezvous. On Wednesday, May 27, 1931, the Oregon Journal published a similar photograph, image No. 371N3105, and a story about the crash, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of plane on golf course after fatal crash

Photograph of an unidentified man looking at the wreckage of a small Pargon Flying Service airplane after the plane crashed on the West Hills Golf Course in Portland on Tuesday, May 26, 1931. The pilot, Roy H. Scheffel, was killed. A cropped version of this photograph was published in the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, May 27, 1931, under the headline “To Death on West Hills Golf Course.” The photograph had the following caption: “Battered wreckage of the light plane in which Roy H. Sheffel [sic], operator of the Rendezvous eating place, made a fatal plunge to the seventh fairway of the West Hills golf course Tuesday afternoon. The picture was taken after the ship had been righted.” The photograph accompanied a story about Scheffel’s death, headlined “Cafe Man Killed in Air Crash.”

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a Varney Air Lines mail plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. On December 1, 1929, the Oregon Journal published a front-page story about the crash, headlined “Mail Pilot Rams Span; Badly Hurt.” A similar photo, image No. 371N3109, was published on Page 2 that day. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the [Interstate] bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day.

Wreckage of airplane near East Glisan Street

Photograph of a group of people gathered around the wreckage of an airplane in a field. Trees and a fence line are visible in the background. The text “Varney Wreck — near E Glisan St” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. “Varney” may refer to Varney Air Lines.

Wreckage of airplane near East Glisan Street

Photograph of a group of people with the wreckage of an airplane in a field. Some of the people are leaning or sitting on the remains of the plane. The text “Varney Wreck — near E Glisan St” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. “Varney” may refer to Varney Air Lines.

Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane in Vancouver, Washington

Photograph of a crowd looking at the wreckage of a plane near the port dock in Vancouver, Washington, on Saturday, November 30, 1929. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 2 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, December 1, 1929, under the headline “Fog Claims Another Plane Victim.” The photograph had the following caption: “Wreckage of Varney Air Lines mail plane which spun to the ground at Vancouver Saturday afternoon after nicking the north tower of the Interstate bridge.” The photograph accompanied the continuation of a front-page story about the crash. According to the story, the plane’s pilot, Clarence C. Price, was unable to land at Swan Island airport in Portland because of fog and turned toward Vancouver. A witness reported hearing a loud noise and seeing the plane “carom off the north tower of the bridge and go into a spin.” Three people pulled Price from the burning plane after the crash, the Journal reported, but he died the next day, December 1, 1929. Also see image No. 371N3106.

Crashed airplane upside down in marshy area

Photograph of an unidentified man peering at an airplane lying upside down on marshy ground. Damage to the plane’s wing is visible on the left side of the image. The number “NC 10672” is painted on the plane’s tail. Also see image Nos. 371N3111, 371N3112, 371N3113, and 371N6197.

Crashed airplane upside down in marshy area

Photograph of an unidentified man peering at an airplane lying upside down on marshy ground. Damage to the plane’s wing is visible on the left side of the image, and the number “NC 10672” is painted on the plane’s tail. Trees, hills, and what may be a river are visible in the background. Also see image Nos. 371N3110, 371N3111, 371N3112, and 371N6197.

Damaged airplane in water near rocky bank

Photograph of a damaged small plane lying near the rocky bank of a body of water. An unidentified man is standing at the water’s edge in front of the plane. A boat is in the water near the plane. In the background is an unidentified person in a rowboat. The number “NC2722” is visible on the plane’s wing and tail.

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