Air pilots

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Air pilots

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Air pilots

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Air pilots

171 Collections results for Air pilots

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Charles Richard Stanton

First Lt. Charles Richard Stanton was the first black bomber pilot in the U.S. Armed Forces—he flew 81 combat missions in Europe during WWII. He was born in Maryland in 1920, but had moved with this family to Portland by the 1930s. He enlisted in 1942 into the Air Corps for the duration of the war, plus six months. He died in 1991, and is buried at the Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.

Commander Richard E. Byrd and unidentified man

Photograph of two men standing outside a building and looking at one another. The man on the left, the aviator, explorer, and United States naval officer Richard E. Byrd, is wearing an overcoat and visor cap. The man on the right is wearing a hat, overcoat, and tie. The text “Com. Byrd” is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image. See related image Nos. 371N0390 and 371N3646.

Commander Richard E. Byrd

Portrait of a man, the aviator, explorer, and United States naval officer Richard E. Byrd, wearing an overcoat and a visor cap. The text “Comander Byrd [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image. See related image Nos. 371N0389 and 371N3646.

Pilot Frank M. Hawks during refueling stop in Portland

Photograph of Captain Frank M. Hawks in the cockpit of his plane on Saturday, January 23, 1932, at Swan Island airport in Portland. Hawks made two brief fuel stops in Portland that day while flying from Agua Caliente, Mexico, to Vancouver, British Columbia, and back in a successful attempt to set a speed record. A similar photograph, image No. 371N1082, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 24, 1932. It accompanied a story headlined “Hawks Sets Record for 2-Way Dash.” According to the story, Hawks set a round-trip speed record of 13 hours, 43 minutes, 59 seconds.

Pilot Frank M. Hawks during refueling stop in Portland

Photograph of Captain Frank M. Hawks in the cockpit of his plane on Saturday, January 23, 1932, at Swan Island airport in Portland. Hawks had stopped briefly for fuel while flying from Agua Caliente, Mexico to Vancouver, British Columbia, and back in a successful attempt to set a speed record. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N4991 and 371N4992, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 24, 1932. The photographs were published under the headline “Speed King Refuels Here on Flight.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Hawks Sets Record for 2-Way Dash.” According to the story, Hawks set a round-trip speed record of 13 hours, 43 minutes, 59 seconds. Image note: The name “Hawks” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Crew refueling pilot Frank M. Hawks’ airplane in Portland

Photograph of two men refueling Captain Frank M. Hawks’ plane as Hawks speaks with an unidentified man at Swan Island airport in Portland on Saturday, January 23, 1932. Hawks made two brief fuel stops in Portland that day while flying from Agua Caliente, Mexico to Vancouver, British Columbia, and back in a successful attempt to set a speed record. A cropped version of this photograph, along with image Nos. 371N1082 and 371N4991, was published on Page 1 of the Oregon Journal on Sunday, January 24, 1932. The photographs were published under the headline “Speed King Refuels Here on Flight.” This photograph had the following caption: “Attendants at the airport refueling the ship while Hawks chatted with bystanders for a few minutes.” The photographs accompanied a story headlined “Hawks Sets Record for 2-Way Dash.” According to the story, Hawks set a round-trip speed record of 13 hours, 43 minutes, 59 seconds.

Crew refueling pilot Frank M. Hawks’ airplane in Portland

Photograph of a crowd watching as two men refuel Captain Frank M. Hawks’ plane at Swan Island airport in Portland on Saturday, January 23, 1932. Hawks is standing in the cockpit. He made two brief fuel stops in Portland that day while flying from Agua Caliente, Mexico to Vancouver, British Columbia, and back in a successful attempt to set a speed record. On Sunday, January 24, 1932, the Oregon Journal published a story about Hawks’ flight on Page 1, under the headline “Hawks Sets Record for 2-Way Dash.” According to the story, Hawks set a new round-trip speed record of 13 hours, 43 minutes, 59 seconds.

Photograph of two men with plane

Photograph of a picture of two unidentified men, probably aviators, standing next to an airplane. The man on the right is wearing a heavy flight suit, an aviator cap, and goggles; the man on the left is wearing a heavy jacket , trousers, and an aviator cap and goggles. An “X” is marked on the original picture above the man on the left, and the words “Metcalf Photo.” are written at he bottom.

Birch, pilot

Portrait of a man with a mustache standing next to an air plane. His eyes are closed and he is wearing a collared shirt and bow tie. On his shirt is a wing-shaped pin bearing the words “National Air Tour” and “pilot” on it. This photograph may be related to image No. 371N2270.

Thomas Colby, Charles W. Meyers, Bill Baldwin, and unidentified man next to plane

Photograph of four men in front of an airplane. The three men on the left, Thomas Colby, Charles W. Meyers, and Bill Baldwin, were the team of Plane 19, a Waco, on the 1928 Ford National Reliability Air Tour; the man on the right is unidentified. The tour reached the Swan Island airport in Portland on July 16, 1928. Meyers was the pilot. The name Meyers is painted on the plane and the number 6528 appears on its tail. The text “T. B. Colby — Charles Myers [sic] — Bill Baldwin” and number 2 are written on the negative. The the writing is visible on the right side of the image.

Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, team of Plane 23, Ford National Reliability Air Tour

Portrait of three men, Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, in front of an airplane. They were the team of Plane 23, a Lockheed monoplane, on the 1928 Ford National Reliability Air Tour. The tour reached Portland on July 16, 1928, and the Plane 23 team was the first to arrive at the Swan Island airport. Schoenhair was the pilot and Cooper was the mechanic. The text “Cooper — Shoenhair [sic] — Ray Acre” and the number 8 are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image.

Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, team of Plane 23, Ford National Reliability Air Tour

Portrait of three men, Eddie Cooper, L. F. Schoenhair, and Ray Acre, in front of an airplane. They were the team of Plane 23, a Lockheed monoplane, on the 1928 Ford National Reliability Air Tour. The tour reached Portland on July 16, 1928, and the Plane 23 team was the first to arrive at the Swan Island airport. Schoenhair was the pilot and Cooper was the mechanic. The text “Cooper — Schoenhair — Acre” and the number 9 are written on the negative and are visible on the right side of the image.

Lieutenant W. L. Cornelius, pilot, at air show

Portrait of a man sitting in the cockpit of an airplane, probably at either Swan Island airport in Portland or Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington. He is looking back over his shoulder and is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles. A cropped and reversed version of this photograph was one of five, including image No. 371N5913, published on the front page of the Oregon Journal on Wednesday, September 28, 1927, as part of coverage of an air show. The photographs were published under the headline “Z-O-O-M! These Are Lads Who Skim Towers!” With the photographs was the caption: “Some of the famous fliers whose stunts have thrilled thousands in Portland Tuesday and today.” The caption went on to identify the man in this photograph as Lieutenant W. L. Cornelius from Selfridge Field in Michigan. Also see related image Nos. 371N6105, 371N6106, 371N6107, 371N6108, 371N6112, and 371N6126. Image note: The text “Lut [sic] W. L. Cornelius” is written on the negative and is partially visible on the left side of the image.

Amelia Earhart

Three-quarters portrait of pilot Amelia Earhart sitting on a couch, facing front, and holding a bouquet of roses. The photograph was taken on Wednesday, February 1, 1933, after Earhart arrived in Portland to give a lecture. That day, a story about Earhart and a related photograph, image No. 374N0284, were published on the front page of the Oregon Journal. See additional related image Nos. 374N0282 and 374N0283. Image note: The text “Amelia Earhardt [sic]” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Dorothy Hester, pilot

Portrait of stunt pilot Dorothy Hester next to an airplane. She is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles.The text “Dorothy Hester” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

Dorothy Hester and Tex Rankin next to airplane

Photograph of pilots Dorothy Hester and Tex Rankin standing next to an airplane. Hester is pointing toward the top left and is looking at Rankin; he is looking in the direction she is pointing. The text “Hester” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the negative.

Dorothy Hester, pilot

Portrait of stunt pilot Dorothy Hester seated on top of an airplane with her legs in the cockpit. She is wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles, a sweater, and a skirt. The text “Dorothy Hester” is written on the negative and is visible at the top of the image.

Pilot Martin Jensen

Photograph showing pilot Martin Jensen wearing an aviator’s cap and goggles and facing to the left. At far left is an unidentified man in a United States military uniform. An airplane wing and a crowd of people are visible in the background. The name “Martin Jensen” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the photograph. Image note: Photograph shows discoloration due to deterioration of the negative.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly and Captain John M. Stanley in plane after return to Pearson Field

Photograph of two aviators in a plane outside a hangar at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday, January 7, 1927. A cropped version of this photograph was published on Page 3 of the Oregon Journal on Saturday, January 8, 1927, under the headline “Here’s Kelly — If Anyone Asks.” The photograph had the following caption: “After losing and finding themselves again while looking for Leslie Brownlee, lost on Mount Hood, Lieutenant Oakley Kelly and Captain John Stanley returned Friday to Vancouver barracks. They were greeted by Motorcycle Patrolmen Regan and Tauscher, who joined in the search for them. Kelly is shown in the front seat of the plane, Stanley behind.” According to an accompanying story, headlined “Kelly Tells of Harrowing Trip; Never Such Fog,” Stanley and Kelly had left on Wednesday, January 5, to conduct an aerial search of Mount Hood for Brownlee, but were caught in a storm and dense fog. They were forced to fly east and land in a field about five miles from Long Creek, in Grant County. According to the story, they spent the night in the field with the plane and walked to get help and fuel the next morning. On their return flight, they were delayed by another storm and spent the night of Thursday, January 6, in Pendleton before continuing to Vancouver on January 7. See related image No. 371N5908. Image note: The text “Kelly + Stanley” is written on the negative and is visible on the left side of the image.

Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington

Portrait of a smiling man, Lieutenant Oakley G. Kelly, commander of the 321st Observation Squadron at Pearson Field in Vancouver, Washington. He is near a hangar at Pearson and is wearing a fur-trimmed coat and an aviator cap and goggles. The text “Kelly” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the right side of the image.

Les Meadows and Shields

Portrait of two men. The man on the right, pilot Les Meadows, is wearing a jacket or jumpsuit with “Les” and the words “Rankin Flying School” embroidered on the front. The man on the left is wearing a jacket, tie, and collared shirt. Handwritten on the negative are the names “Les Meadows,” visible on the right side of the image, and “Shields,” visible on the left side of the image.

Pilot Tex Rankin holding black cat

Photograph, taken on August 24, 1928, of pilot Tex Rankin holding a black cat he borrowed from a Portland girl, Carol Mangold, to take with him on a national air race from New York to Los Angeles. The cat was one of two “jinxes” that Rankin deliberately adopted for the race; the other was to enter his plane under the number 13. On August 24, the day Rankin departed, the Oregon Journal published a story on Page 2 about the pilot and the cat; the headline was “Rankin and His Jinxes Go East to Start Derby.”See related image Nos. 371N5919, 371N5920, 371N6220, and 371N6222. Also see the following images related to Rankin's return from the race: 371N5921, 371N5922, 371N5923, 371N6141, 371N6150, and 377N0032. Image note: The number 6 is written on the negative and is visible in the upper left corner of the image.

Tex Rankin, Dorothy Hester, and two unidentified men next to plane

Photograph showing pilots Tex Rankin (second from left, in flight suit) and Dorothy Hester standing next to an airplane with two unidentified men. Rankin and the man next to him are looking at an envelope they are holding. Hester and the man on the right are looking at a document he is holding. The man is wearing a uniform and a badge with “PFD” on it. The text “Am. Legion + Rankin” is written on the negative and is faintly visible on the left side of the image.

James Rinehart carrying propeller

Photograph of pilot James Rinehart carrying an airplane propeller over his shoulder. He is wearing a jacket, breeches, and boots. The name “Rhinehardt [sic]” is written on the negative and is visible on the right side of the image. See related image No. 371N6185.

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